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  3. Foreshot

    Ultimate New Distillery Guide

    Man I've been wondering what you've been up to, now I know. Kudos! I'll be reading it in greater detail over the next couple days and I'll give you some feedback.
  4. Dehner Distillery

    Continuous Column Distillation

    I just finished up a Column here in Iowa. 30' tall 18" column, Insulated to 28" in dia. LED light via blue tooth. 17 GPM. I specialize in continuous stills.
  5. Patio29Dadio

    Ultimate New Distillery Guide

    Well done. I have some feedback. I will get back to you soon.
  6. Yesterday
  7. daveflintstone

    Ultimate New Distillery Guide

    Well I find that fascinating. As in, what kind of chemicals will come over at 94.9% and not 95% ? wot kinda witchcraft be that??
  8. Thatch

    Continuous Column Distillation

    Who's plans are you using Pete? I am familiar with http://www.ferromit.com He's in the Southern Hemisphere as well.
  9. Thatch

    Dephleg hotter than column

    I've been following this thread. If Paul, Mike and Meerkat actually solve the problem for Jen they get my championship trophy. GREAT effort guys!
  10. Hi all, I'm new to this forum and I'm new to distillation so, first of all I want to say thanks to every one for the help, and sorry for the (maybe) stupid questions. I write from Italy (sorry for my bad english) and I have to say that it is very difficult for me to find some info on moonshine distillation seen that in my country grappa is the only traditional distillate. Last week I prepared my first 5 gallons mash (20l) with 7.7 pounds corn (3.5Kg) and 2.2 pounds malted barley (1Kg) and I'm now waiting the end of the fermentation. For the distillation I'll use a 2.5 gallons (10l) pot still so I'll have to distillate my wash in 2 rounds. Searching on internet I found a lot of information on how to make cuts, but the topic is still not very clear to me. Someone base his cuts on distillate ABV, some others on the temperature, some others on both so my question is: Can I base my cuts only on temperatures of the vapours? If yes, at which temperature should I make the cuts for foreshots, heads, heart and tails? My idea is: - discard everything below 181°F (83°C) as foreshots - collect everything between 181°F and 190°F (88°C) as heads in different jars and then decide if discard everything or if mix something with the heart - collect everything between 190°F and 203°F (95°C) as heart in different jars and then decide if keep everything or discard something - collect everything between 203°F and 212°F (100°C) as tails Can it be correct? Another question is: Is it mandatory to make a double distillation, or can I run only one distillation making the cuts and put my moonshine in the jars as final product? Thanks again for your help!
  11. adamOVD

    Ultimate New Distillery Guide

    I just scanned some it pretty quickly, but I think you did an excellent job covering a ton of key of information in a very concise way. Best guide I've seen so far. Think a lot of people will find this very helpful. Couple points I found especially interesting- n 2017, testing was done to all of the spirits submitted to the ADI spirit competition and 80% of the vodka submitted had chemicals in them that indicated that it had not been distilled above the 95% alcohol required to call them vodka As you can see, those two rules of thumb illustrate the vast difference between the two distillery models: a distillery bar will need to sell 13 times less booze than the distribution facility.
  12. Southernhighlander

    Dephleg hotter than column

    Jen, Mike said that he helped you to get your still functioning correctly. Is everything still working okay? If you need anymore help just let us know.
  13. Odin

    What ever happened to iStill?

    You can now finance your iStill distillery! For more info, read the attached blog post: https://istillblog.com/2018/11/13/istill-rent-to-own-now-available/ Regards, Odin.
  14. InsuranceMan 2.0

    Technology Woes

    ***** UPDATE ***** All, I see that this topic still gets a lot of views, and I wanted to inform you all that my cell phone number is still the same. It is 307-752-5961. I am no longer associated with the prior email address and toll free number however, so if you are looking to reach out to me please do so on my cell at 307-752-5961. I am still the number one go to guy for distillery insurance and welcome any of my past clients to contact me as well as the new. I still have the most competitive coverage available with the lowest premiums in the country. Stay Vigilant, Aaron a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0
  15. InsuranceMan 2.0

    Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit - BOR/AOR

    Happy Tuesday morning, ADI, In today's installment I want to start out by saying I hope everyone had a very wonderful and reflective Veteran’s Day. The recognition of this day is something that I personally hold very near and dear to my heart. I have Veterans in my family, friends that have served, and I am proud to say that I work with many former and active military members who own and operate distilleries. To all Veterans everywhere, you have my loyal thanks and gratitude. Let us never forget all you have done for this country and our freedoms. Now on to the topic at hand: The nasty, low-down, evil, and vile BOR/AOR!!!!!!!! What is a “BOR/AOR” you may ask … Well let me tell you … The acronym “BOR/AOR” stands for “Broker of Record” or “Agent of Record” letter. This is one of the oldest, nastiest, dirtiest, and possibly the most deceitful things that Insurance Agents have in their box of tricks. The function of a BOR/AOR started out, as most things do, as a good and helpful tool in the insurance world. However, it was not long after this process was developed that many chose to use it for evil instead of good. The BOR/AOR process was developed to assist clients in moving their insurance from one agent to another in the case that the current agent was unresponsive, or if the agent and client reached an impasse and could no longer work together for whatever reason. In some instances, it can be useful when a client wants to move a policy to someone with expertise in a certain area. The BOR/AOR process allows the client to reassign their existing policy, via the same carrier, to another agent all while retaining their current coverage and premium. Again, this process was to only be used in unusual circumstances where the client and agent simply could not see eye-to-eye anymore, or an agent possessed a certain expertise or skill set. It should only be used to counteract “Irreconcilable differences” shall we say. The same could be said for the quoting process, and many agents use the BOR/AOR even in the early onset of working with a client, tisk-tisk! Most insurance carriers will only release one quote proposal to the first agent that has submitted the business accompanied by a full application. The reasoning for this is that the carrier does not want to complete with itself across several different agents who may be submitting information that differs from one to the other. One agent may submit information stating that the insured is doing x, y, and z, while another may say they are doing a, b, and c. Completely different things, completely different proposals. Therefore, most insurance companies avoid releasing multiple proposals whenever possible. This is where the nasty agents come in and try to BOR/AOR the quote proposal. The NERVE!!!!!!!! Fast forward to about 5 minutes after this potentially good process was put into practice and you will see THE DARK SIDE! Insurance agents discovered quickly that this process could be abused in order to obtain fully written policies or proposals quickly and without having to put in much work. They found that they could simply have someone sign a letter, submit some information, and BAM! Instant money! Sounds like a pretty good gig, right?!?!?!?!?!?! Well, that all depends on your point of view and how the process is presented. Again, if this process is utilized correctly, then there is nothing wrong with it and it is useful. If your agent is a “hit it and forget it” kind of sales person who wrote your policy and then never spoke to you again, but your coverage is good, and you want to keep it but move it to someone else, then this is a potential way to make that happen. This is not usually how it is presented though. Most agents will tell a potential “easy mark” client that in order for them to quote the business, or open up the markets, that all you have to do is sign this letter to give them access. Many times, they won’t even say that much. They will simply say that you need to sign the letter in order to allow them to work on your behalf. Afterall, you have to sign so many documents anyway, what is one more? So they just slip it in. Many agents will go with the out-and-out lie approach. Now, I will throw in a caveat here … I have probably handled around 100 or so BOR/AOR’s in my career over the last 16 years. Each and every one of them has been on the up-and-up though. I always preface this process in the same way, and in my assertation, the correct way. I ALWAYS say to the client, “By signing this letter you fully understand that you are FIRING your current agent and HIRING me as your authorized representative, correct? Once you sign this letter, the other agent will be notified directly by the company and given 10 days to try to win you back. They will call you, they will email you, and they may even get mad at you. I want you to fully understand that by signing this letter you are giving me the authority to represent you and your coverage to the insuring company.” In my case, with this understanding laid out in advance, I have never had a client say that they did not want to go through the process. With me, it is due to my expertise and abilities that clients will knowingly move their policies. I will say though, that in ever case, I will try to find replacement coverage that is as good or better than what the client has prior to ever even broaching the BOR/AOR subject with them. It is never, and should never be the first thing that an agent does in the process of assisting you with your insurance. That is just deceitful and not how relationships are built. A quick story … about two years ago I had a client that had a partner and that partner agreed to meet with a local insurance agent. They had the meeting (although my friend did not want to) and found out quickly that not only was the other agent not an expert in distilleries (as he had led them to believe), but he was also new to insurance as a whole. They thanked him for his time, and as they were literally getting into the cab back to their office, he ran up to the car and told my friends partner that he needed a quick signature in order to prove to his boss that he was out at a meeting. They both thought this was strange, but the partner signed his name anyway, figuring maybe it would help this guy out. Well, lo-and-behold, it turned out that he was actually having him sign a BOR/AOR letter!!!!!!!!!!! I was notified the next day that my friend had signed over all authority on his policy that we had work on together for years. So, I called him up to find out what was going on. He stated that no one signed any such letter, that they would never reassign my work to someone else. As he reflected on it, he recalled that his partner signed something, but it was just a verification that they had a meeting with this agent. I told him to get a copy of that document and really take a look at it. Sure enough, it turns out it was a BOR/AOR letter, but the other agent had hidden that part under another sheet of paper, and his partner was deceived into signing the policies over. In the end, we countermanded the letter and that agent lost his insurance license and faced penalties and fines for his deceitful behavior. The long and the short of this Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit is this … Look at everything you are signing. Know what you are signing. Ask questions about what you are signing, and if you ever find yourself in a similar situation, walk away. If someone is willing to use deceitful practice in order to start a relationship with you where they are supposed to be taking care of you and have your best intentions in mind, the relationship should never be started in the first place. Stay Vigilant, Aaron a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0 307-752-5961
  16. MG Thermal Consulting

    Continuous Column Distillation

    Per Pete's post, you still need the chiller system for cooling mash. If you can't get the mash done fast enough, it will become a choke point for production.
  17. MG Thermal Consulting

    300 gallon Trident Still, boiler and mash tank

    I have sold many customers of Trident their chillers. Contact me if you need a price, new or recon available.
  18. TequilaBrand

    Custom Bottle

    Love the fire Robert!
  19. Need to get moved out of my building, Any takers on a turnkey distilling solution?
  20. CalwiseSpirits

    Assistant Distiller - Paso Robles, CA

    Job Summary We’re looking for an Assistant Distiller to help run our distillery in Paso Robles, CA. Experience in beer, wine, or spirits production is required. We're willing to train the right person so this position is open to soon-to-graduate students as well. This is a full time position and an opportunity to get involved with a startup distillery and grow with us from the early stages. In addition to compensation and benefits, stock options will be available after 1 year of employment. Responsibilities and Duties Fermentation management Distillation Proofing Barreling Bottling Labeling Record keeping and reporting Materials ordering Cleaning and sanitization Qualifications and Skills Bachelor Degree (a science degree such as Wine and Viticulture, Brewing Science, Food Science, Chemistry, or Biology preferred) General knowledge of and passion for spirits Work or internship experience in the wine, beer, or spirits industry is preferred but not necessary Driver’s License and reliable transportation to our distillery in Paso Robles, CA Ability to lift 50 pounds, stand for long periods of time, stoop, bend over, reach Must be 21+ years old How to Apply Email a cover letter and resume to aaron@calwisespirits.com About Calwise Spirits Co. Our company was borne out of our love for California. We're a fast-growing spirits brand based out of our new home in sunny Paso Robles, CA. We're currently distilling Big Sur Gin made from wine grapes and native plants, Blonde Rum rested in chardonnay barrels, and Spiced Rum infused with oranges. New expressions will be released in the coming months. With a taste inspired by the California experience, our spirits are more than just a drink: they’re accompaniment to your lifestyle of adventure, exploration, and unrestrained revelry. Our spirits are sold through over 300 stores and bars in California, including Whole Foods Market, Vons, and BevMo.
  21. I'm acquainted with some folks that started a vodka brand in NYC as a part-time side project. They've had some decent placements in high visibility New York City on-premise accounts, and a few in the Los Angeles area as well. However a lack of available time has them questioning how much longer they want to manage it, and curious if anyone else is interested in taking it over. PM me if this might be something you'd be interested in.
  22. captnKB

    Continuous Column Distillation

    Hi Toddy, I have never encountered a 12" column from Vendome before. Is it a single pass or just a stripping column?
  23. Last week
  24. PeteB

    Sediment in finished bottles

    Firstly I am not concerned about the Flocc or whatever it is. Jim Murray's Whisky Bible has scored 7 of my whiskies Liquid Gold in the last 4 years including best whisky in Southern Hemisphere this year. I don't plan to change my production methods. That is not quite right because I am continually developing new products. I was intrigued when Bluestar said the flocc was caused by barrels only, but from what he said since, I think the reason I get Flocc in white spirits is because I cut further into tails than most people. I have not tested the pH of my rainwater, but whatever it is I doubt that I will attempt to correct it because if it "aint broke dont fix it" Thanks for the discussion, we should never stop learning. Pete
  25. PeteB

    Dephleg hotter than column

    Maybe we speak a different language in Australia, to me what you have described is foaming in the still pot that rises up into the helmet then eventually into the column, but in your reply you said no foaming in the pot. What do you mean by "puke"? With all these tests you are running I assume you have alcohol in the pot and not just water? I know very little about this type of still but wondering if trays will fill with just water. How much heat are you putting into your pot? Too few Kw. could cause some of the symptoms you have.
  26. Southernhighlander

    Dephleg hotter than column

    Jen, The above is a very good explanation of what you need to do.
  27. bluestar

    from Copper to Cooper to Copper still

    If you are in Illinois, I suggest you join the Illinois Craft Distillers Association. You might want to do that even as a regional cooperage, or associate member in any case. And I would be happy to give you some feedback, just visit our distillery. We are very small, and I don't know how much you intend as a small amount to put toward start up, but even a very small distillery will require 100s of K dollars, especially in Illinois. Good luck!
  28. bluestar

    Sediment in finished bottles

    Yup, that could be it, the concrete will provide calcium and some magnesium salts, and may be alkaline (check the pH). Generally, those salts will cause precipitation of organic salts or general cloudiness. If you are going to use that water, you need to do reverse osmosis.
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