Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. You want to send employees up a ladder and have them try to dump 50lb bags into a steaming tank? I get that many of us are true small businesses, with actual tight budgets, and that most of us WANT the best and safest equipment/processes but lack the funds to put those expensive things in place. However, regularly going up a traditional ladder, more than a step or two, with a 50lb bag is a serious injury or death just waiting to happen. You'll want a catwalk with a platform where you can set a pallet of grain for the worker to safely handle it. As far as dust goes, we used to mill on site with a grist mill and that produced a lot of dust in the bags. Now we have it crushed by a malt house and the dust has been significantly reduced to the point where I don't even consider it a problem.
  3. Here's a video that helped me. there's no one right answer though. I think this is a pretty good example of how most people run, but I believe some people will run more like a pot still, running at a lower heat, and just using the plates for passive reflux, or running the dephlemator just at the beginning and/or end of the run to isolate heads/tails.
  4. Today
  5. We use the rolling stairs as pictured above. I'm not sure about your concerns on approval or sparking, this is the way most brewery and distilleries start out. I'd be more concerned about OSHA showing up when someone is hauling a bag up the ladder.
  6. The sensor will be helpful but you need ventilation. A wall vent with a fan that is triggered by the sensor would do the job.
  7. I'd recommend using a set of rolling cantilever stairs vs. a ladder.
  8. Add more of the same proof ethanol to the batch and it will disappear
  9. Inside the production area containing fermentation tanks, 1000L still and 2000L still is a set of stairs downstairs to the boiler room/bathroom/storage area (steel door separation at bottom of stairs). An engineer was concerned about the settling of CO2 in the bottom of the stairwell. The stairwell is on an outside wall. Best way to manage this? My intention was to put a CO2 sensor in that area.
  10. There's a bit of re-working due to space limitations in our distillery and our mill is being relocated off-site. The plan is to hand load milled grain bags (50 lb sacks) into the mash tun. Yes, up the ladder and into the top of the 15 bbl tank. In the existing on-site mill room, which is being de-constructed, there is an exhaust fan which could be re-positioned about 4 feet. Thoughts on hand loading grain other, than that's a lot of physical work? I'm concerned about the sparking and approval.
  11. Arak is not terribly relevant to a discussion about bacterial strains, but there is fair archaeological evidence that puts origin of alcohol distillation into 3rd century India, and some place it in China. Safest to say that scholars disagree. We make an 'arak' for a restaurant group using grape brandy and Syrian aniseed, its fun, they mostly use it in cocktails and tiki-style drinks.
  12. Wanna see the iStill manufacturing process? https://istillblog.com/2020/08/06/manufacturing-process-istills/ Regards, Odin.
  13. Yeah man, anise-free absinthe is not absinthe. That's bogus, as it's an offshoot of Arak, just like Ouzo. Arak is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  14. Raki is hardly new. It's an offshoot of Arak, which is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  15. Arak is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. Cheers!
  16. Did you know that Arak is the world's oldest spirit? It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  17. I'd be interested in trying the Arak. Did you know that Arak is the world's oldest spirit? It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  18. @PeteB I think you mean Arrack - NOT - Arak. Arak is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. Arrack is a completely different beast though. As Arak was the first spirit that many civilizations ever encountered, the word "Arak" became synonymous in these countries with "Distilled Spirits", and in terms of ingredients, methods, and flavor they are too dissimilar from Arak, and cannot fall in the same category of drinks. Arrack is a term used throughout the Far East for a variety of unrelated spirits. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  19. Howdy folks. Checkout this article about the history of Arak: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass/ Checkout this video to see how Arak is made: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc
  20. Guys you gotta distinguish between Arak, Arrack, Aragh and other similar sounding spirits. Arak is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries began making their own arak, and each modified the original recipe (i.e. grapes & aniseed) based on available ingredients and culinary preferences. The italians sweetened it and called it Sambuca; the French aged it Oak and called it Pastis, the Greeks added additional herbs and spices and called it Ouzo (and Tsipouro in Cyprus); the Tunisians made it from figs and called it Boukha; the Moroccans made it from Dates and called it Mahia. All of these are similar anise-flavored spirits, all of which are direct descendants of Arak. Arrack and Aragh are a completely different beast though. As Arak was the first spirit that many civilizations ever encountered, the word "Arak" became synonymous in these countries with "Distilled Spirits", and in terms of ingredients, methods, and flavor they are too dissimilar from Arak, and cannot fall in the same category of drinks. Aragh in Iran has a neutral flavor and is closer to vodka, while Arrack is a term used throughout the Far East for a variety of unrelated spirits. For more on the little-known history of Arak, checkout this article: www.muaddi.com/arak-muaddi-heritage-in-every-glass To see how traditional Arak is made, checkout this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OULUs5kMDc Cheers!
  21. Yesterday
  22. What are the best methods for making cuts on bubble plates? Anyone have suggestions or experience?
  23. Hi, would you consider selling the mash tank separately? Thanks.
  24. 7800 liter pot still, steam fed, pall ring packing, 12 ft column with dephlemeter, 16 ft condenser, chiller. for sale.
  25. Natural cork? Could be cork taint or "corked" spirit...
  26. You can get garbage can lid style tops for any of the Italian wine tanks, you just need to inquire. They aren't air tight tops, but are snug enough, stainless and do match. Far less expensive than a closed tank. We have them for our Marchiso tanks - I believe they were even less expensive than the variable capacity floating lids.
  1. Load more activity


×
×
  • Create New...