Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Foreshot

    Sourcing bacterial strains for rum fermentations

    Yes-ish. You talk about getting the right ones in abundance. I agree with this. If you have an abundance of good ones it helps the equilibrium go the way you want. In distilling we set the conditions for outcome we want. We can't dictate the outcome. Your ideas align with that philosophy. Yes. All ferments have a wide variety of fusel oils and fusel alcohols, it's just a matter of how much. Most commercial distillers I know hit ~1.000 and run it. It makes a clean taste not much by way of character. I find the ferments that I abuse more have more fusels and end up being more interesting - mostly good but sometimes bad. This is something we need to research more. I believe, though I don't have evidence, that the removal of the water molecule reduces the boiling point. I think that's why most esters come over in the early heads to early hearts. Side note, some interesting things I found while researching this post: https://www.solubilityofthings.com/water/alcohols <- simpler alcohols are miscible, but higher alcohols are less so to the point they aren't really at all. This could help explain what happens when you phase separate low wines. It's not just fusel oils, but fusel alcohols too. https://sites.duke.edu/apep/module-1-gender-matters/content/content-what-is-alcohol/ <- chart showing # per 100g of Butanol and higher alcohols, including Amyl (pentanol). Anything above this will float and be able to be removed by phase separation. https://socratic.org/questions/how-do-covalent-bonds-dissolve-in-water <- Alcohol floats on water until given time to diffuse.
  3. Today
  4. Southernhighlander

    Filtered Gin?

    majorservices Do you run through your gin basket then plates & dephleg or through your plates & dephleg then gin basket?
  5. Yesterday
  6. bluefish_dist

    Ace Rotomold Fermenters for sale

    300 gallon went to a new home today. Still have the 110’s and 85’s.
  7. Silk City Distillers

    Filtered Gin?

    You don't charcoal filter gin. If you want to treat your neutral with carbon first, go right ahead, but you simply can not do it after you infuse the alcohol with botanicals.
  8. Grant

    How are you cleaning bottles

    The top is a sink cutout from a Corian countertop. Chafing Dish 1/2" copper pipe and fittings. 3/8" stainless pipe uprights. We crimped the tops with a large drill chuck. We brazed the copper to stainless but would recommend compression fittings instead. Mash pump from More Beer. Quick connect fittings. Helps to burp pump for priming and cleaning. We don't seem to use the valve ever. 10" filter from Home Depot In the back ground we have some racks from Costco these have been fantastic for drying. I can get 120 bottles per shelf and the neck of the bottle fits nicely in the 2: mesh hole. We use 15% alcohol solution for rinsing.
  9. Jpaul

    first time rum

    nothing certain.. I believe it was the temperature of my wash when fermenting, as I used bread yeast. I raised the temperature to about 20 C and was able to get it down to 1.011 gravity, I distilled it at that, I don't know the quality yet, I bottled it with wood chips to try to mellow it, so i will see what it's like in a couple months. I really don't think I'm the one to ask, sorry.. it could be what they said above. although my wash had no molasses at all and fermented down to 1.011 although it did take about 40 days...
  10. bostonapothecary

    Sourcing bacterial strains for rum fermentations

    I wish there was more data on this. The best questions were asked before the GCMS era. We can look at things so easily now which would yield some awesome dissertations. Supposedly, built in water destroys the least esters, but watering high ABV destroys the most. I think it is the final act of getting it to drinking proof that needs to be considered the most. As we all know, challenging economics surrounding building in all that water rather than adding it at the last minute. Isn't ethanol very polor? So what may happen is that higher alcohol esters may break and ethyl esters reform. This would be bad because you're limiting diversity and freeing fusel oil. I don't really understand the higher alcohol esters. Some literature claims they are the weakness of continuous column of stills. Basically higher alcohols get trapped in a zone and increase the chance of ester formation. Problem is that these esters are often plebeian and ordinary, overly diffusive in the top notes, and can make a California brandy or Old Granddad smell cheap like a banana. This problem may assume we are talking about basic ferments that don't have diverse quantities of fatty acids. What do you think of this: many esters formed during distillation are temporary place holders. We hope for ethyl esters to increase the volatility of noble fatty acids even though they will break and not reform. These temporary place holder esters just get them across the cut and in to the hearts defying their typical fate. This may be fine because noble volatile acidity may contribute to quality. However, if a higher alcohol ester breaks this may be very bad. Amyl alcohol is less polar than ethanol so that favors reformation with ethanol and the free amyl alcohol increases fusel oil content. Amyl alcohol is also perceived as the most dissonant of the higher alcohols. But how significant is that number of freed up amyl? Who knows. What I wish we knew more about is, exactly how volatile are all of the higher alcohol esters? The birectifier fractions hint that they are less volatile than fusel oil, but a few are famously more volatile (isoamyl acetate). In many cases, these esters may only function as a temporary place holder for fusel oil, reducing its volatility which is a win and allows you to distill further into the run collecting more of other high value congeners. It is best to reduce fusel oil at fermentation, but to some degree (not well understood), it may be reduced by reactive distillation (mentioned up thread by @Silk City Distillers). Maybe we can't assume all esters are straight forwardly useful?
  11. Jon6451

    Ace Rotomold Fermenters for sale

    interested. Please give me a call. 303.668.0722 Jon
  12. Skaalvenn

    first time rum

    Bluefish is right. A pH meter is an essential tool if you want a distillery that makes money. It could also be done fermenting due to the unfermentable sugars in molasses. I have had molasses that wouldn't ferment below 1.035 from a 1.090 start. I thought it was stuck, added heat, added nutrients, added yeast and nothing happened. So as a final test I added raw sugar and it fired off again for an hour or two, so the answer was the molasses.
  13. Silk City Distillers

    Mash Tun not Heating

    This thread has gone way too long, so some random thoughts. 1. Try using the top jacket for heating, and the bottom for cooling. It's highly likely that the corn was sitting on the very bottom of the tank, despite the mixer running, insulating the tank contents from the undersized bottom jacket. The top jacket will not see the same kind of insulated blinding that the bottom would. Undersized jackets work fine, they just take longer. By reversing these, once you've gotten to the point of needing to cool, you'll have solids well into suspension with lower viscosity - so the tank should mix better. Honestly, at start up, I bet that mixer is just pushing the corn around on the bottom. 2. My comments about replacing the incorrect plumbing the top jacket port MUST BE DONE, whatever the approach. PRV, Vacuum Breaker, Air Vent, Gauge. No Chinese stuff, get the appropriate parts from a reputable steam trim manufacturer (Armstrong, Spirax Sarco, etc etc). Honestly, I'd replace the traps too, but that's just me. PRV - Vented to Safety, Air Vent - Vented to Safety, Vacuum Breaker, Gauge - on every jacket - this means 2x for the mash tun. 3. Do not plumb both jackets for dual duty heating and cooling. It's highly unlikely that this tank was built to handle the thermal stresses involved. While it would probably work for a while, the continual thermal shock would eventually tear welds and deform the tank. While you can reduce the risk by introducing tempering control to the jacket, we are talking about fairly complex systems here. 4. There is a possibility you can retrofit direct steam injection into the tun, and use the jackets for cooling. This is what I do. Keep in mind, this can be very stressful for your boiler, and it means no boiler additives - aka reduced boiler life. The drawing has what looks like a bottom port into the kettle directly, this might work, or you could retrofit a steam line through the top dome down into the mash for an injector. DSI is the most efficient and fastest form of heat transfer. 5. Throw those pretty poppet valves out. The picture posted shows that they are 1.5 bar, that's 22 psi - so they are both questionable in quality and reliability, as well as being entirely useless at 22psi.
  14. Silk City Distillers

    Mash Tun not Heating

    Thanks Paul, I'll go ahead and make the change.
  15. bluefish_dist

    first time rum

    Sugar washes which include rum without a lot of molasses tend to crash on ph. That can make them stop early. You really need to watch ph and keep it above 4 ish. Add calcium carbonate or other bases to increase ph. Rum should easily go from 1.10 to 1.02 ish in 10-14 days with proper nutrients and ph control and 85-90 deg temps.
  16. richard1

    Mash Tun not Heating

    If you have your steam guy coming in, try this as a last result / action ........ and only for testing to give you direction. Using a SS flexible steam hose, connect steam supply to the connection where the pressure relief valve is on lower jacket. If you heat up then as silk City mentioned, your problem was because of entrapped air. Cheapest solution to everything and you can then still use upper jacket for cooling.
  17. jenschmunk@gmail.com

    first time rum

    Did you managed to figure out what went wrong in your procedure? I have an identical situation and have repitched YN, heated up with aquarium heaters AND repitched yeast and have moved from 1.034 to 1.030 in a few days. Tips?
  18. Southernhighlander

    Mash Tun not Heating

    Richard, Those valves are really dangerous for the reason you said. The Chinese sent me some samples in the beginning but I researched them and never used them. They are inherently dangerous for most applications. I started using the correct ASME PRVs made in the USA right from the start. Also my safety manual states that all PRVs on our steam stills steam jacket, inner boiler and column must be plumbed into a drain, if at all possible or at the very least plumbed to within a couple of inches off the floor. My safety manual states that if the PRVs are not plumbed in this fashion accidental Injury or death may occur! The Chinese do not typically give any kind of safety guidance.
  19. Last week
  20. Dehner Distillery

    Looking to buy used bourbon barrels

    I have 53g used barrels all of the time. Please give me a call 515-559-4879 Joseph
  21. richard1

    How are you cleaning bottles

    Somewhat different but shown for info only, I built a semi automatic filler for our carbonated cider production. The bottle is gripped, inverted and rinsed. Here I used chlorine dioxide which is great as a sterilant leaves no taint. BF sale.mp4
  22. richard1

    Mash Tun not Heating

    Just for info, Those supplied safety valves are combination over pressure relief as well as vacuum relief. w.r.t over pressure relief their standard is generally 1 bar (~15 PSI) BUT I have seen some with lower values. This is all to do with internal spring sizing. That said, these are not calibrated valves and are at best approximate. The big danger with these valves is that the vented product exits from the side ports and is a danger to anyone in close proximity. The vent needs to be directed down to a safe area.
  23. Southernhighlander

    Mash Tun not Heating

    That is absolutely incorrect. That stainless valve is a European design that the chinese stole years ago. It is not an ASME section VIII PRV. In fact it is has no ASME rating what so ever so it does not meet code. For the steam jacket you need an ASME rated section VIII pressure relief valve to be legal For the cooling jacket the Chinese knock off prv is absolutely incorrect. You need a PRV for liquid for the cooling jacket. Also you should be very very careful with that cooling jacket. Depending on the inner wall thickness 30 psi of water pressure may cause the inner wall to give inward or the jacket to rupture. Also you must have vacuum relief on the steam jacket or your steam jacket may implode. Also if you leave the manway closed with no vacuum relief on the inner pot during cooling, BOOOM your mash tun will wad up like an aluminum beer can, being crushed by a big burly redneck like me. That has happened to more than one Chinese inner pot because they do not normally know that they must put a vacuum relief valve on the inner pots of mash tuns with cooling jackets or coils. Vacuum is a force of nature that could make you shit your pants when it occurs to your mash tun while you are standing beside it. If you want to purchase the correct valves for your still and mash tun's steam jackets and inner pots email me paul@distillery-equipment.com Also just so you know. There is a chance that the non UL listed Chinese motors on your agitators will not pass inspection because they are not UL listed. They must be UL listed for either class 1 div 2 or class 1 div 1 for the still. Depending on our your inspector he may let the CE listed motors slide or he may not because they are certainly not up to code standards. If the one on your still pot is not CE EX then it could be very dangerous if your mechanical air seals for your agitators are out of adjustment and start leaking. If the air seals are not leaking now they certainly will at some point when they go out of adjustment. If you had purchased from me you would have gotten American made PRVs and VRVs of the correct type for your steam jacket, cooling jacket and inner pots. You would also have received a very comprehensive safety manual. You would have recieved American made UL listed C1 D1 agitator motors. You would have received VFD drives to give your agitators variable speed and reversing capabilities that you don't have. Also I would have sold you a mash tun with a viable crash cooling system for your mash. Also i would have made sure that your vessels had the properly sized steam connections. Also the heat up time on my steam heated mash tun would be 1 hr and the total crash cooling time would be 30 minutes. My stills heat up time would be 1 hr or less and the run time for a stripping run is 2 to 3 hrs. Also if your still has a bubble plate column it will probably flood or not function correctly unless the still is a DYE still. Also all of my pro series vessels have insulation jackets. Also my agitators are very low RPM with very large paddles. If they gave you high rpm agitators with small impellers they do not work for corn mash or rye mash in the mash tun or still. All of this being said and considering that time is money. Do you really think that you saved money in the long run buying from the Chinese? You may just be seeing the beginning of your issues.
  24. Southernhighlander

    Mash Tun not Heating

    Silk, You may have an issue with your pressure relief valves possibly 2 issues. Number 1 if the pressure relief valves are for steam then they must be ASME section VIII. Yours appear to be section IV which are good for your steam boiler but not for your steam jacket. Here is a link to an apollo ASME section IV valve which is not for steam jackets http://cdn.conbraco.com/apollovalves/products/documents/SS_13-100_200_1064.pdf Here is a link to a section VIII which is required to be on steam jackets of pressure vessels and vessels that operate at less than 15 PSI. These valves are required by law for steam jackets http://cdn.conbraco.com/apollovalves/products/documents/19Series_SS1118.pdf3 I have seen a couple of ASME section VIII designs that look like section IV so you should check your PRVs for the steam jacket to make sure that they are section VIII and not section IV The second issues is that steam PRVs MUST always be upright to function correctly. Yours appear to be horizontal in the pics. If you need section VIII valves let me know. I am an Apollo dealer and I keep section VIII valves in stock for steam jacketed vessels up to 2000 gallons capacity.
  25. Apologies for the previously incorrect pricing. This is not a $50,000 still; title corrected and additional image linked. Cheers
  26. Southernhighlander

    Charcoal Filter Questions

    Thanks Jedd.
  27. majorvices

    Filtered Gin?

    Having issues with my first attempt at Gin. I have an 18 plate bubbler and a 4 plate whiskey column.When I make my gin I make it like I do my vodka. I run through the entire still(whiskey and vodka plates- total of 22 plates, as a spirit run after a stripping run.) I run the vodka through a charcoal filter to polish it. It does very well and is a solid, very clean vodka. The problem is when I filter the gin I lose the bontanicals. The first time I packed the filter like I do the vodka and when it came through it literally smelled and tasted like vodka.I pulled out 2 thirds of charcoal and ran it again.Not much botanical loss but definitely an "unfiltered" flavor. One suggestion I got was to filter my "vodka"first then run it through the gin basket. But I really didn't want todo that.
  28. Georgeous

    Mash Tun not Heating

    This is what I have for all jackets glycol and steam are you saying this is incorrect
  1. Load more activity
×