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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/18/2018 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    For instance, I just downloaded a public report from OLCC which documents: 1. the exact number of bottles sold in Oregon of every SKU of every distilled spirit product for the years 2016 and 2017 2. the total dollars sold in Oregon of each distilled spirit SKU for the years 2016 and 2017 It's interesting stuff. Some of the micro brands that are perceived as "successful" sell surprisingly low numbers. It helps me realize that micro distillers are totally wasting their psychic energy by feeling "competition" amongst each other. If only we could sell 1% of what Smirnoff coconut flavored vodka sells........
  2. 1 point
    I'm only a contractor, and can't comment anymore due to my customers best interests. A company that threatens legal action, instead of defending their quality when faced with proof of poor manufacturing is on the brink of failure. It's a shame, because a lot of people would love to invest in American equipment, and think they are with this outfit, but a simple Google of import records reveals all. And companies like Still Dragon, who straight up distribute import systems, have very nice products. Leaks? Non issue. Contamination? No. Finish? Impeccible. That's how bad it is.
  3. 1 point
    There's an IWSR / Park Street 2017 report I've read and that I can't republish but I think it's online somewhere that has great figures. One that I recall is out of the 1800+ DSP's close to 1600 +/- sell less than 550 cases per year. That blew me away. And that represented 20% of all sales, and this from the 85% of DSP's. The other 15% sell 80% and of that 80% remainder less than around 5% sold most of it. It's been awhile since I read the report and may be off a smig, but I'm sure you get the idea. There's a whole bunch of DSP's not making a whole lotta juice and a very few making most. Another stand out is they discovered that a DSP's removing less than 10,000 PG annually was most likely still cash flow negative. I know this isn't a ray of sunshine, but one needs to know the road their on to get to where they set off to go. Mash on, Dave
  4. 1 point
    The state of Oregon makes information on alcohol sales public
  5. 1 point
    Hi Nabtastic, For what it's worth, we recently moved locations (new fire and building approvals), and we had to modify 13 stainless steel single wall tanks with pressure release vents and sealed lid gaskets and lever rings, even while stored in our H3 (fire rated room), to comply with the spirit of NFPA. Plastic IBC totes are not usable for us at all upon landing at our facility, and we have full automatic fire suppression throughout the building. The 240 MAQ is in force for us anywhere outside the H3 storage room, which means 240 gallons of alcohol on the floor for us at any time, and its assumed that all tanks and distilling equipment are UL rated. Tank sizes did not matter in our situation. We had a issue with open vs. closed system in terms of distillation, but were able to keep the 240 MAQ with the open system, but they did initially want us to install a closed system (distillation directly to tank) vs. the open parrot into tank with open alcohol in the building, and threatened to drop our MAQ to 120 during that negotiation. Oh, and we had to install an explosion proof fan in the H3 storage room with a direct vent to outside of the building (through the roof), and had to install and use near ceiling exhaust fans in the building when distilling/pumping/bottling, etc. And the ethanol detection system... Good luck with the upgrades, sounds exciting!
  6. 1 point
    My tanks are 250, 550 and 750 gallons and they are stackable. They are rated for spirit storage and are stainless steel. My pricing is much better than Skolniks per gallon and my tanks will store more ethanol in a much smaller space than the skolnik tanks.
  7. 1 point
    Specifics of the effect of a dephleg depend very much on the geometry and design of the dephleg and how it is operated. So there is no very useful basic answer, other than to say: it will increase reflux at the head of the still or in the vapor path (depending on design), which will tend to increase proof, increase separation, but reduce flow. Other than geometry and design, in operation, you want to control the temperature and flow rate of the coolant in the dephleg to vary the reflux, and you may want that to be fixed or to be varied by some sort of feedback system. Beyond that is beyond the basics, and also will require details of your depheg geometry and design.
  8. 1 point
    I stand by my comment that 6' packed column might not be enough on its own, but in the configuration Paul (Southernhighlander) describes, combined with 6 plates, that should indeed work. We did the same thing for our 8' packed column, adding 4 plates, just got us over 190. But it was not optimal, and a bit harder to keep stabilized. In the end, we switched over to a 17 plate column of smaller diameter, using, by the way, full disclosure, a SS pot we purchased from Paul. Another advantage of plates, if you can observe them while running, is you can see how the column is stabilizing, and if it is being overdriven or underdriven. Also, if the structured packing is not of good design or packing, you can get non-uniform behavior. That said, a good structured-packing-filled column can make great vodka, and is usually far cheaper than the plated column. A rough rule of thumb for packed columns is the height in feet should be roughly 1.5x the diameter in inches. That was our experience, and is similar to that described by Paul for the Vendome still at Rock Town. But the specific height required will be dependent on the kind of packing used. I also agree with Paul that you don't want to be direct heating high-wines. In addition to the safety issues, the high proof alcohol is more corrosive, and will likely cause even stainless elements to quickly erode and potentially fail. Cleaning wasn't hard for us for a packed column, we just back flushed by circulating hot PBW and back rinsed by circulating hot citric acid, and that will clean in place. You can also remove the column, seal an end, and fill for soak cleaning.
  9. 1 point
    PT's words couldn't ring any truer. One thing I've herd mentioned was the expense to go. So this is what is cost me last week to attend. Travel cost, air, parking gas to Boston. $687. Lodging $987. Food (you have to eat anyways) $218 Lyft $104. Total $1996. And we saved over $8000 on this years first quarters FET payment. So we still saved over $6000 in one quarters FET payment. So the moral of the story is not it cost to attend these Washington DC trips BUT what is it going to cost you in 2019 when the FET reduction expires. We all need to pull the rope in the same direction. When the next DC trip is arranged I expect you all to attend and support the work of others, that is saving you a HUGE amount of money to reinvest in your business. And thanks to all that DID attend this and last year. And all the people that made this possible. Please feel free to call me if you have any questions 207-363-9322 -Dave
  10. 1 point
    Thank you everyone for your responses. It was actually a mistake that we made here at ground level. We were using a tube that was not rated to handle 190 proof alcohol. We were getting traces of the rubber in the alcohol and that was leaving the blue tint. Make sure everything you're using is rated for high proof alcohols.. Thank you for your help!!
  11. 1 point
    Our MiniMax Closed Loop Rinser rinses bottles with your own spirits prior to filling, and runs on compressed air. We've done some in-house testing of just blowing bottles with compressed air. What we've found is that air alone—even if treated—isn't very effective. Even at fairly high pressures, it tends to just blow the particles around, but they still remain in the bottle. Liquid is much more effective at rinsing. If you want to just hook up air, you can use our Rinser/Sparger and get the 'Sparger Only' option. Typically it's used by wineries and breweries who want to sparge their bottles with inert gas prior to filling to prevent oxidation, however if you just hook up high PSI air to the inlet , it will just blow compressed air into the bottles. My warning remains, though. It's not as effective as a wet rinse.
  12. 0 points
    Sure. Wash filler appropriately. We do keep a distinct filter for each spirit type.
  13. 0 points
    I typically sell once used barrels for $200, multiple use barrels for $150 and barrels that are no longer really usable (for holding liquid at least) for $100. It blows my mind that folks are paying/charging more for used barrels than what a new one actually costs ($250), but apparently the demand for used barrels supports it and most breweries dont know what a barrel costs these days.
  14. 0 points
    Vacuum still are incredibly useful in any application where one would want to protect flavor compounds adversely affected by heat. While not the most practical for the every day run of the mill weekly stripping run in a whiskey centered distillery, I bet if you knew how to use one creatively it would make your own operations better, more unique, and more versatile. Broad reductionary statements are ridiculous. Most would be better off making a habit of using them less.
  15. 0 points
    That is an odd reply from them. Usually, if they have a question along those lines, they will simply require a lab sample. PPM of licorice root doesn't matter per se, it is the PPM of the limited chemical Glycyrrhizin. As Glycyrrhizin, it is limited to 0.1%, or 1000 PPM. Usually, if you indicate a limited amount of licorice added to the spirit in the process, it guarantees that you can not reach that limit. Likely your formula is in the gray area where the upper bound of your formula would not keep you below 0.1%? Because 1 gallon of spirit is 2987 grams, and if all 24 grams licorice was introduced into the spirit as Glycyrrhizin, then you would be 0.8%, which is well above the 0.1% limit. So, they need some way for you to demonstrate how you will ensure less than 0.1% using the quantities and method you describe. One way is if you knew the weight of the licorice before and after distillation, worse case assume all that is Glycyrrhizin, and calculate result of upper bound. It should be below 0.1%, IMO. Or offer to have them test it, they don't charge you.
  16. 0 points
    Below is a little 105 gallon Mash Tun stripping still that we completed today. With the correct amount of copper packing in the column this still will give you more copper vapor interaction than an all copper pot still. You can mash and distill in this unit. You can even ferment in it if you like. The price is less than $14,000 complete with the heating system and everything. You can start with this unit and then add a dedicated mash tun and fermenters as needed.
  17. 0 points
    Klattig, It's sort of off of the subject but a 4" column plate column is way too small for a 100 gallon still. I bet you have some really long run times with a 100 gallon charge.
  18. 0 points
    We still have two places available for the iStill Advanced Gin School in Jersey City! If you want more info, please reach out to jason@istillmail.com or veronika@istillmail.com! For more info, see: https://wordpress.com/post/istillblog.com/12383 Regards, Odin.
  19. 0 points
    More on our activities on the Indian sub-continent: https://istillblog.com/2018/05/26/istill-representation-in-india/ Regards, Odin.
  20. 0 points
    @HedgeBird I am looking for new empty bibs
  21. 0 points
    And here's a picture of Tim picking up his iStill 100 for product development. Genever and gin will be among his first products! A dozen iStill distilleries in Belgium and counting! Regards, Odin.
  22. 0 points
    It depends a bit on the still you use and the flavor profile you are after, BJ! If you use an iStill you'd be pretty much spot on for a multi-dimensional gin. Front, middle, and back. I just helped set-up a new Irish distillery and those were the settings we dialed in. I do advice you taste, especially from 91C onwards to make sure you don't make your gin to tails oriented. On Ireland ... the visit here was amazing. Beautiful distillery (see my other tread on how iStill is doing), amazing people, beautiful weather. And a nice surprise on the way out, via the airport: our customers are taking over the shelf all over the place. Rumor has it that "we" kicked back big alcohol and made them lose 55% market share in the last two years. Craft distillers rule! https://istillblog.com/2018/05/17/istill-customers-take-over-irish-gin-market/ Regards, Odin.
  23. 0 points
    This is a short story about me instead of "just' iStill. How Odin is doing? Well, very well, thank you for asking! A few months ago, I was in bad shape. Overweight and tired. I went on a diet and feel amazing. Lost 15 kilo's of fat (33 pounds) while gaining 5 kilo's of muscle (11 pounds). Full of energy and very busy designing new ground breaking continuous stills, vacuum stills and working on a new heating system I'll keep you posted! Regards, Odin. comparisson.jp2
  24. 0 points
    I Have got to give Blue Label props....Nice print work and some of the best support and responsiveness out there!!
  25. 0 points
    I believe you me and silk city seem to be the ones diving into trying to produce the highest quality rums with the help of Arroyo's papers. I have not heard much others talk much about it. In fact, I just got back from Portland and met with several distilleries. House Spirits produce a Rum in house as well as a Rum that they produce in Guatemala and bring in. Both are just fermented sugar cane and the their team didn't know much about the "rum oils" we are seeking. Similarly I spoke with New Deal who are actually giving a seminar on Rum at ADI, but did not know about Aroyyo or the rum oils. To my knowledge, there are not any distilleries in Denver that are producing rum and when I ask around i get the same answer or either not caring or not knowing. I have recently been playing around with clostridium saccharobutyricum and have decided to now work with it any longer. It is resilient bacteria that grows well in many conditions. The only way that I have found to store it is in dirt, all other mediums do nothing to keep it dormant. I am afraid that if I let it into he distillery it will create a house flavor. My research has led me to understand that it is not the bacteria we need, but the esters that it creates thus giving rum oils. There are many esters that are favorable and the one that I chose (and is also a product of clostridium saccharobutyricum) is Ethyl Butyrate. Ethyl Butyrate is the product of the esterification of Butyric Acid. Form there I had to make a choice on what bacteria I could use that will produce Butyric Acid. Luckily with the advancement of fermentation science, I know that there are several strains of Bacteria that produce Butyric Acid. The one I have chosen is a strain of Brettanomyces that I have sought out for its characteristics of forming light funk, heavy pineapple and guava, has an attention of 70-85, ferments at 85 deg F and an alcohol tolerance of around 12%. Its a great bacteria and is used in a single, primary fermentation. I have not run it through the still yet, as I have not run a large enough batch. My current hold up is actually sourcing a quality sugar cane. I have been trying to source panela since it is the highest quality and has not gone through any processing that separates the argricol (molasses). The only source I have found can only import a full container, which is not practical. Once I get the proper sugar cane sourced I will start the distillation process, which in theory will be separating the methanol, collecting the ethanol and then taking several smaller cuts once the esters start coming and going very deep with with a lower temp (much like a quality tequila distillery does to collect the esters). I can then create 3 products, a light rum that is majority ethanol, a heavy rum that is ethanol with portions of the ether cuts and a dark that rum with the rest of the ethanol and ester that will be barrel aged to break down the long chain alcohols and hopefully create some nice tannins. Anyways, just wanted to share my thoughts and where the Arayyo papers have taken me. I love rum, I am very passionate about it and I want to create what will hopefully be one of the best quality Rums in the world. There are plenty of people making really great whiskeys, but very few that are creating unique, high flavor rums. To me it is not just a fermented Sugar Cane product.


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