fotoski

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    Photography, Chess, Brandy and Bourbon.

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  1. Yes, this is the approach and there are many more avenues to explore. It also involves distilling the spirit differently if you intend to harvest the barrel in two years rather than ten. There are many other barrel management techniques -- such as transferring to neutral barrels, slow reduction to bottling proof, marrying blends for six months in cask -- that preserve flavor congeners in the spirit while providing a smoother, subtler final product.
  2. Yes, it is a slow learning curve and there are many mistakes out there to make. If distillers can share knowledge about what happens when you run your still slower, and to explore the subtleties that happen with proper barrel management over time, more of those long awaited experiments will turn out well. The rules would not pertain so much to production as they would to labeling, so that it may be determined what production techniques were used. This is more concerned with truth in labeling, so that a consumer can pick up a bottle and decipher how the spirit was made; where it was distilled, from what ingredients, what size barrel, how much time, presence of any additives... etc. It would be a voluntary system for those who would like to have a recognized standard of quality on their label.
  3. Let he who has an ear hear what the spirit has to say.
  4. The Slow Distillation Movement Hubert Germain-Robin Being an aficionado of the Slow Food Movement since the beginning, I would like to add another antidote to the tyranny of the fast food industry and the frenzied pace of modern culture. Slow Distillation By using ancestral methods of distillation, when time was not such a pressing issue, one would conduct the distillation at a slow pace to be able to separate with precision the different components, to make clean cuts and to respect the temperature during the gathering of the distillates. With today’s hurried approach, many of these parameters are undervalued or even ignored by craft distillers. For centuries, distillers passed down to successive generations the nuances of creating flavors from the materials available. These artisans created good spirits before thermometers were invented, not understanding the molecular difference between methanol and ethanol or even knowing the names and vapor temperatures of any of the compounds they were separating. Distillers must listen to a spirit coming off the still in order to understand how much time in the barrel it will take for flavors to blossom and come to full beauty. Little thought or teaching is currently given to the understanding of how to ferment and distill a spirit when one intends to age it for 4, 12, or even 20 years. The rapidly made products often seen today have a limited appeal to consumers who pay attention to what they are drinking. This commodity approach to spirits production may produce a few small fortunes, but will no doubt produce many more inferior products that will need the presence of a bartender to bring to full flavor. Slow Maturation: By learning from the experience of generations of cellar masters, one realizes that time and patience are factors you cannot fully control, except by having proper levels of humidity and temperature in your cellar. Forcing the aging process by raising temperatures and using smaller barrels (which are usually made of wood of lesser quality) to obtain faster extraction often results in harsh and excessive tannins, which will take many years for the spirit to digest. Balance and harmony are reached by knowing the pace of transformations occurring in the barrels through the periods of oxidation and of rest. This is necessary and elementary to have a quality product. In the modern distillery age, the distiller is more likely to be flooded with information about saturating their spirit quickly with wood extract to make it marketable than they are presented with information about how to slowly nurture barrels into producing a supple, round, full flavor from the depth of years. Consequently, today’s distiller is more likely to toss their precious water of life into barrels and forget about it for two years, or for six years, and with little regard to maintaining proper maturation conditions, whatever the recipe, like a cake baking in the oven for whatever amount of time. By making abstraction of, or simply ignoring, either slow distillation or slow maturation, these craftsmen limit themselves in creating true artisan products. The consequences are not always obvious in the short term but appear later, resulting in regrets and disappointments. Remember: In this long journey, you cannot go back in time; you have to live with your decisions—good or bad. Can a rum or whiskey, after being stored in a barrel for only a year, truly be called mature or aged when, at the same time, a brandy, Cognac, Calvados or Scotch (and many other spirits) have to rest at least 2.5 years in oak (which is still quite young) to get the due appellation? I urge the distiller to slow down, take a mindful approach and join in the sharing of small details that, when combined together, have the effect of creating a spirit that can be savored. At the beginning of this revolution—which will go on for years, decades and centuries—the foundation can be laid so that craft will become the designation of quality. Rules should be put in place—by the craft distilling industry itself—to establish control over the declaration and on the labels for the consumer’s good. The Europeans have put a strict system in place that could be used as an example to make designations fair for everyone. Such a system will also serve to elevate quality, and reinforce appellations and sub-appellations, that will be created in the near future. For more information, email: Hubert Germain-Robin hubertgermainrobin@gmail.com Nancy Fraley nancylfraley@yahoo.com Andrew Faulkner drew@distilling.com
  5. Hi Andrew, are you in New Orleans yet?

    I am at the Monteleone, my cell 4043452215 if you want to catch up for a drink or chat.

    Peter Bignell

  6. The TTB is proposing several changes to the regulations. The goals seem to be simplifying paperwork, reducing mostly reporting, streamlining the COLA process and many other things. There will now be a period of public comment regarding many of these changes. The link leads to an article in the National Law Review that summarizes TTBs proposals: http://www.natlawreview.com/article/alcohol-and-tobacco-tax-and-trade-bureau-ttb-publishes-projected-regulatory-agenda
  7. Good Luck! Let us know if you need anything. Cheers, Drew
  8. The hourly schedule for the ADI Conference and Vendor Expo, March 30 -- April 2, 2015, has just been released. You can find it on the ADI site: http://distilling.com/wp-content/themes/TFA-ADI/images/uploads/2015/01/ADI-2015Schedule.pdf
  9. The complete schedule was just posted online: http://distilling.com/wp-content/themes/TFA-ADI/images/uploads/2015/01/ADI-2015Schedule.pdf
  10. Craft Certification Update A call for greater truth in labeling As of press time, the Certified Craft Spirits™ database has swelled to 874 brands by hundreds of distilleries in 44 states and Canada. The list of American craft spirits has now reached critical mass and can be taken to the next level in building a bring from the producer to the consumer. On Monday March 31, ADI staff met with an advisory board of distillers to discuss possible changes to the ADI definitions of Certified Craft Spirits™ and how to handle certain products that may fit within the spirit but not the letter of the rules, and to consider possible changes to the craft certification program. Present were ADI staff members Andrew Faulkner, Nancy Fraley, Eric Zandona and Matt Jelen, and distillers Darek Bell of Corsair Distillery, Ryan Hembree of Skip Rock Distillers and President of the Washington Distillers Guild Steven Stone of Sound Spirits. This was followed Tuesday April 2 by a panel discussion featuring Bell, Hembree, Stone, Faulkner and Jim Blansit, of Copper Run Distillery. Primary topics of discussion at the meeting were the definitions of Certified Craft Distilled Spirits™ and Certified Craft Blended Spirits™, and if the craft-blended designation was necessary or denigrating to the program. Also discussed were more than 70 spirits that had applied for craft certification but had not been approved because of minor variations from the rules. The vast majority of these were spirits that stated “produced by” instead of “distilled by” on the labels. The panelists weighed in on the distilleries and spirits using their personal experience and knowledge to determine if they fit the definition of craft. Most were approved conditionally, which is to say they are placed on the database but denoting that their was an variation from the rules that had been discussed by the advisory board. Many distillers have a large stock of printed labels that may say “produced by” or “handcrafted by” and it would be costly to reprint these. Good news coming from TTB is that distillers need not re-apply for a COLA to change these words to “distilled by”, if indeed they do distill what is in the bottle. Methods to handle such variances in the future were discussed and solutions include changing label wording, inspection of the distillery by ADI personnel, or review of the TTB-approved formula. The most interesting proposition put forth both at the meeting and at the panel discussion, and one that would further promote truth in labeling, is for producers to print the DSP number of the distiller(s) on the bottle, similar to the NOM that Tequila producers must print on their labels. This would clear up any confusion on where a spirit had been distilled. ADI advocates that moving forward, craft producers should all put the DSP numbers of all distilleries that had a hand in producing the spirit in the bottle. This push to further extend “Truth in Labeling” could clear up confusion regarding the pedigree of a spirit. Another issue of contention is the Certified Craft Blended Spirit™. The distillers on the panel moved for the elimination of this designation saying that it muddied the water. At issue is how to exclude producers who simply watering back neutral spirits to produce vodka or release Kentuckiana whiskeys under a label implying they were created in-house. Germain to the idea is whether the flavor of the spirit is significantly altered by the artisan. The vast numbers of gins start with a purchased spirit that is then macerated and redistilled by the producer. There is no doubt that the flavor profile of the spirit is produced by the hand of an artisan, but many of the distillers feel the crucial step in determining what is craft is that of transforming a fermented product into a distilled product. Many fantastic liqueurs with the aesthetic imprint of the hand of a creator begin with bulk spirits produced on the open market. Most DSPs think the definition of craft should describe exactly what they do. Farm distillers are entitled to feel that they have a greater degree of craft because they grow the raw ingredients they ferment and then distill. Those that ferment have a hands-on contact with the process to a greater degree than those that purchase wine or wash for distillation. Those that distill from scratch can feel a greater sense of involvement than the creator of a redistilled spirit from NGS (as is the case with most gins and liqueurs). All these steps connote a greater or lesser degree of involvement in the process of creating spirits. Some distillers who have built their own stills have expressed the opinion that those distilling on purchased equipment show a lesser degree of craft. At the panel discussion, the conversation was passionate and diverse with most of the sentiment echoing that a spirit is created in the act of distillation. Toward the end, John Wilcox of Rogue Spirits took the microphone for a thought provoking opinion that created laughter and applause. “I want to make sure we don’t forget that we are all artisans,” said Wilcox. “We are all tied to a very lengthy history of art. And when we think about art, we have to think about all the artists that have come before us, outside of distilling, in all the various different trades they were part of. Once upon a time, artists used to make their own tools. They used to grind beetles to make cadmium. They made their own brushes out of whatever, … Picasso is very well known in the art world for making wash, but he also used found and common objects for his collages. And of course all artists decry the presence of Duchamp and his very-famous Readymades, which are still elevated to fine art to this day. Art is not dead, mind you. It is still alive.” “What we have to focus on is that we are artisans and the big people are not, … ‘cause they’re using weird science, and computers and, … God is dead,” with laughter from the crowd and the speaker. “The question should never be who is more craft than the others. There is an element of craft distilled, but I think we should be focusing more on artisinally-produced or artisinally-whatever because there are amaros being made with NGS; there are gins being made with NGS but they are being transformed. We don’t have to crush our own beetles to make cadmium anymore. We don’t have to do that. We can buy that at the store, and you can still make amazing paintings, but does that make that painting less valuable because you used store-bought cadmium with artificial color in it? Just a thought.” “Let’s all celebrate the art of what we are doing and not celebrate the division and the elitism that we are dealing with here. Let’s all bind together and take out the people who have killed god,” followed by rousing applause.
  11. Here is the schedule for the ADI's upcoming conference in Seattle, March 31 - April 2. Enjoy! Saturday, March 29 8 am – 5 pm • 3-Day Hands-on Whiskey Distilling Workshop at Heritage Distilling begins Sunday, March 30 7:45 am • Assemble in Lobby for Bus to BroVo Spirits, Amaro Workshop, return bus, leaves 4 pm 8 am - 5 pm • 3-Day Hands-on Whiskey Distilling Workshop at Heritage Distilling — day two 6-9 pm • Sign-in, Sheraton Downtown Seattle Hotel, 2nd floor Monday March 31 7:30 – 9 am Sign-in for workshops, Sheraton Hotel, lobby. 8 am Buses leave for one-day workshops • Hands-on Malt Whiskey Workshop: Matt Hoffman at Westland Distilling • Hands-on Gin Distilling Workshop at Captive Spirits: David T Smith and Ben Capdevielle, at Captive Spirits • Hands-on Vodka Distilling Workshop: Graham Hamblett and Mike Sherlock, at Fremont Mischief Distillery • Hands-on Rum Distilling Workshop: Eric Watson instructor at 3Howls Distillery • Whiskey and Rum Blending Workshop: Nancy Fraley instructor at the Seattle Sheraton • Working with Grape Varietals for Brandy: Hubert Germain-Robin instructor at the Seattle Sheraton 10 am – 5 pm Hop-on Hop-off Bus tour Seattle Distilleries 4 pm Bus leaves Heritage Distilling workshop for Seattle Sheraton 6 pm – 9 pm Seattle Craft Cocktail Circuit: Specials at the following bars – Liberty Bar, Elliot’s Oddfellows, Toulouse, Local 360, BlackBottle, Tini Bigs, Clever Bottle, Back Door at Roxy’s, Babar, Snoqualmie Casino, Monsoon East, Taste at SAM, Aragona, Eureka Burger, Hazelwood, The Hideout, Pintxo, The Upstairs, The Gerald, Balmar and more. Tuesday, April 1 7:30 am Sign-in desk open, The Conference Center, Lobby 8 – 9 am Breakfast 8:30 am General Assembly Begins • ADI VP Andrew Faulkner Welcomes Attendees • ADI President Bill Owens 9 – 9:50 am •Keynote Speaker Orlin Sorenson of Woodinville Whiskey • Tax Parity for Craft Producers: Mark Shilling of Revolution Spirits 10 am – 4 pm Vendor Booths Open 10 am – 12 pm • Mark Shilling at ADI booth to talk individually about Tax Parity Break-out Sessions 10 am • What is a Farm Distillery? Panel Discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Ralph Erenzo, Tuthilltown Spirits, Joe and Missy Duer of Indian Creek Distillery, Brady Konya of Middle West Spirits or David O’Neal of Sidetrack Distillery, Tad Seestedt, Ransom Spirits • Code Considerations for Design and Construction of a DSP (2-hours): Scott Moore of Dalkita Architecture and Brad Emerick of Denver Fire Department • The Art of Distillation: Dr. Kris Berglund, Michigan State University • Taking on Investors Without Losing Control: Zac Triemert of Borgata Beer and Spirits, Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits Group 11 am • Nosing for Faults (90 minutes paid): Nancy Fraley of Nosing Services and Julia Nourney Spirits Consultant • The Past and Future of Barrels – Why you can’t find them today: Wayne Curtis, journalist • The Ins and Outs of COLA: Janet Scalese, TTB Director of Advertising, Labeling and Formula • Keep it Clean, Distillery Sanitation: Eric Watson, AlBevCon 12 – 2 pm Lunch 12 pm • So You Want to Start a Distillery? panel discussion (60 minutes): John Jeffries of Death’s Spirits, Evan Parker of Turkey Shore Distilleries and Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits • Creating a Distillery Guest Experiences to Strengthen Your Brand: Mark Ward, Westland Distilling 1 pm • Women in Distilling, panel discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Virginia Miller, with Mhairi Voelsgen of BroVo Spirits, Patti Bishop of Fremont Mischief and Suzy Pingree of San Juan Island Distillery • Navigating distribution in the 50 States: Henry Preiss of HPSepicrurian • Fruit Infusion 101: Erin Gipe of NW Naturals • Designing Your Cashflow for Success and Growth: Kevin O’Brien, Irvine CPA 2 pm • Maximizing Your Gift Shop (90 minutes): Maya Berthoud, Breckenridge Distillery, Kent Rabish, Grand Traverse Distillery, Jim Blansit, Copper Run Distillery • The History of Craft Distilling: Colin Spoelman of Kings County Distilling • Surviving a TTB Audit: Justin Stiefel, Heritage Distilling 3 pm • Working with Exotic Grain Bills: Darek Bell and Matt Strickland, Corsair Artisan Distilling • Who Are the Craft-Friendly Distributors?: John Henry of El Buho Mezcal • The Making of Ole Smoky: Joe Baker, Justin King and John Cochran of Ole Smoky Moonshine Distillery • Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety: Mark Hlebichuk of The Montana Distillery 4 pm • A Distiller’s Overview of Bittering Techniques in Amaro and Bitters (90 minutes, paid lecture/tasting): Stephen Gould of Golden Moon Distillery • Creating Brands That Inspire Devotion: Cynthia Sterling of Sterling Creativeworks • Taking on Investors Without Losing Control: Zac Triemart of Borgata Beer and Spirits, and Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits • Malting with Different Varieties of Grains to Expand Your Flavor Profile : Wayne Carpenter of Skagit Valley Malting • Building a Distillery for $100,000: Casey Miles of California Spirits Company 5 pm • Old Tom Gin Tasting: David T. Smith, Summer Fruit Cup • Whiskey Tasting - Corsair Artisan Spirits 5:30 pm • Showcase of Washington Craft Spirits — tasting 7:30 pm • ADI Awards Gala Dinner and Auction Wednesday, April 2 8 am Sign-in desk open 8 – 9 am Breakfast 9 am Vendor Booths Open Break-out Sessions • Brewery to Distillery (90 minutes), Panel Discussion: Dick Cantwell of Elysian Brewery, Darek Bell of Corsair Artisan, Brett VanderKamp of New Holland Artisan Spirits and Jason Parker of Copperworks Distilling • Sourcing Aged Whiskey: Richard Wolf, Wolf Consulting • Working with the TTB – a Blueprint for a Contructive Relationship: Robert Lehrman, of Lehrman Beverage Law 10 am • Nosing for Faults (2-hours paid): Nancy Fraley and Julia Nourney • The Right Still for the Right Job: Michael Delevante, of Campari (retired Appleton Estates) • Becoming USDA Certified Organic: Keith Barnes of Bainbridge Island Distillery • What do successful Big Brands Have in Common?: Scott Shiller of Thoroughbred Brands 11 am • What is Craft? an update of the ADI Certified Craft Spirits Program: panel discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Andrew Faulkner with Darek Bell of Corsair Artisan, Guy Rehorst of Great Lakes Distilling, Steven Stone of Sound Spirits, Jim Blansit of Copper Run Distillery and Ryan Hembree of Skip Rock Distillers. • Competing with the Big Boys: Martin Pazzani of United Craft Distillers, Inc. • Writing Your Business Plan: Justin Stiefel of Heritage Distilling Co. • Proofing and Gauging Spirits Properly: Jordan Via of Breckenridge Distillery 12 - 2 pm Lunch 12 pm • My Great-grandfather Was the Distiller to the Confederate Army: Paul Caldwell, Confederate Stills of Alabama • Does Your Package Design Fit Your Brand? Tari Gordon of Elite Label and David Cole of David Cole Creative 1 pm • Standing Out on the Shelf: Coordinating Package Design, from the bottle maker to the label printer: panel discussion (90 minute): Erica Harrop, Global Package, David Worrell, of Bochanis Rogan Zoom, Brent Bamberger of Monvera • The Money-Go-Round, tracking the price of a bottle from FOB to the retail shelf: Kurt Charles of Pavilion Brands • How to Get onto My Back Bar, Andrew Friedman, Liberty Bar 2 pm • Micro-oxigenation – a short cut to maturation: Max Buiani, Enartis Vinquiry • Driving Revenue Through Brand Extensions: David Dafoe of Flavorman 3 pm • Botanical Infusion Techniques for Gins (90 minute, Lecture/Tasting): Clay Smith, Corsair Distillery • Monthly Compliance Paperwork: Jim McCoy, Jim McCoy Consultants • Expanding Your Distillery, Panel Discussion (90 minutes): Orlin Sorenson of Woodinville Whiskey, Brady Konya of Middle West Distillery, and Jordan Via of Breckenridge Distillery 4 pm • Controlling Malolactic Fermentation for Brandy: Erica Stancliff of Enartis Vinquiry • Financing Aging Spirits in Barrels – a new source of capital for craft distillers: John Fisher of Fisher and Company 5 pm • Back to Bases, Gin Tasting: David T. Smith, Summer Fruit Cup Thursday, April 3 8 am Buses leave to Woodinville for day 2 of the Amaro Workshop and to Gig Harbor for three-day whiskey distilling workshop 10 am – 4 pm One-day Hands-on Distilling workshops • Hands-on Malt Whiskey Workshop at Westland Distilling: Matt Hoffman, Westland Distilling • Hands-on Gin Distilling Workshop at Captive Spirits: David T Smith and Ben Capdevielle, Captive Spirits • Hands-on Vodka Distilling Workshop: Graham Hamblett and Mike Sherlock, Fremont Mischief Distillery • Hands-on Rum Distilling Workshop at 3 Howls: Eric Watson instructor • Mashing-in for Whiskey at Elysian Brewery: Jason Parker of Copperworks Distilling • Whiskey and Rum Blending Workshop: Nancy Fraley instructor at the Seattle Sheraton • Working with Grape Varietals for Brandy: Hubert Germain-Robin instructor at the Seattle Sheraton
  12. Saturday, March 29 8 am – 5 pm • 3-Day Hands-on Whiskey Distilling Workshop at Heritage Distilling begins Sunday, March 30 7:45 am • Assemble in Lobby for Bus to BroVo Spirits, Amaro Workshop, return bus, leaves 4 pm 8 am - 5 pm • 3-Day Hands-on Whiskey Distilling Workshop at Heritage Distilling — day two 6-9 pm • Sign-in, Sheraton Downtown Seattle Hotel, 2nd floor Monday March 31 7:30 – 9 am Sign-in for workshops, Sheraton Hotel, lobby. 8 am Buses leave for one-day workshops • Hands-on Malt Whiskey Workshop: Matt Hoffman at Westland Distilling • Hands-on Gin Distilling Workshop at Captive Spirits: David T Smith and Ben Capdevielle, at Captive Spirits • Hands-on Vodka Distilling Workshop: Graham Hamblett and Mike Sherlock, at Fremont Mischief Distillery • Hands-on Rum Distilling Workshop: Eric Watson instructor at 3Howls Distillery • Whiskey and Rum Blending Workshop: Nancy Fraley instructor at the Seattle Sheraton • Working with Grape Varietals for Brandy: Hubert Germain-Robin instructor at the Seattle Sheraton 10 am – 5 pm Hop-on Hop-off Bus tour Seattle Distilleries 4 pm Bus leaves Heritage Distilling workshop for Seattle Sheraton 6 pm – 9 pm Seattle Craft Cocktail Circuit: Specials at the following bars – Liberty Bar, Elliot’s Oddfellows, Toulouse, Local 360, BlackBottle, Tini Bigs, Clever Bottle, Back Door at Roxy’s, Babar, Snoqualmie Casino, Monsoon East, Taste at SAM, Aragona, Eureka Burger, Hazelwood, The Hideout, Pintxo, The Upstairs, The Gerald, Balmar and more. Tuesday, April 1 7:30 am Sign-in desk open, The Conference Center, Lobby 8 – 9 am Breakfast 8:30 am General Assembly Begins • ADI VP Andrew Faulkner Welcomes Attendees • ADI President Bill Owens 9 – 9:50 am •Keynote Speaker Orlin Sorenson of Woodinville Whiskey • Tax Parity for Craft Producers: Mark Shilling of Revolution Spirits 10 am – 4 pm Vendor Booths Open 10 am – 12 pm • Mark Shilling at ADI booth to talk individually about Tax Parity Break-out Sessions 10 am • What is a Farm Distillery? Panel Discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Ralph Erenzo, Tuthilltown Spirits, Joe and Missy Duer of Indian Creek Distillery, Brady Konya of Middle West Spirits or David O’Neal of Sidetrack Distillery, Tad Seestedt, Ransom Spirits • Code Considerations for Design and Construction of a DSP (2-hours): Scott Moore of Dalkita Architecture and Brad Emerick of Denver Fire Department • The Art of Distillation: Dr. Kris Berglund, Michigan State University • Taking on Investors Without Losing Control: Zac Triemert of Borgata Beer and Spirits, Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits Group 11 am • Nosing for Faults (90 minutes paid): Nancy Fraley of Nosing Services and Julia Nourney Spirits Consultant • The Past and Future of Barrels – Why you can’t find them today: Wayne Curtis, journalist • The Ins and Outs of COLA: Janet Scalese, TTB Director of Advertising, Labeling and Formula • Keep it Clean, Distillery Sanitation: Eric Watson, AlBevCon 12 – 2 pm Lunch 12 pm • So You Want to Start a Distillery? panel discussion (60 minutes): John Jeffries of Death’s Spirits, Evan Parker of Turkey Shore Distilleries and Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits • Creating a Distillery Guest Experiences to Strengthen Your Brand: Mark Ward, Westland Distilling 1 pm • Women in Distilling, panel discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Virginia Miller, with Mhairi Voelsgen of BroVo Spirits, Patti Bishop of Fremont Mischief and Suzy Pingree of San Juan Island Distillery • Navigating distribution in the 50 States: Henry Preiss of HPSepicrurian • Fruit Infusion 101: Erin Gipe of NW Naturals • Designing Your Cashflow for Success and Growth: Kevin O’Brien, Irvine CPA 2 pm • Maximizing Your Gift Shop (90 minutes): Maya Berthoud, Breckenridge Distillery, Kent Rabish, Grand Traverse Distillery, Jim Blansit, Copper Run Distillery • The History of Craft Distilling: Colin Spoelman of Kings County Distilling • Surviving a TTB Audit: Justin Stiefel, Heritage Distilling 3 pm • Working with Exotic Grain Bills: Darek Bell and Matt Strickland, Corsair Artisan Distilling • Who Are the Craft-Friendly Distributors?: John Henry of El Buho Mezcal • The Making of Ole Smoky: Joe Baker, Justin King and John Cochran of Ole Smoky Moonshine Distillery • Introduction to Occupational Health and Safety: Mark Hlebichuk of The Montana Distillery 4 pm • A Distiller’s Overview of Bittering Techniques in Amaro and Bitters (90 minutes, paid lecture/tasting): Stephen Gould of Golden Moon Distillery • Creating Brands That Inspire Devotion: Cynthia Sterling of Sterling Creativeworks • Taking on Investors Without Losing Control: Zac Triemart of Borgata Beer and Spirits, and Robert Cassell of Millstone Spirits • Malting with Different Varieties of Grains to Expand Your Flavor Profile : Wayne Carpenter of Skagit Valley Malting • Building a Distillery for $100,000: Casey Miles of California Spirits Company 5 pm • Old Tom Gin Tasting: David T. Smith, Summer Fruit Cup • Whiskey Tasting - Corsair Artisan Spirits 5:30 pm • Showcase of Washington Craft Spirits — tasting 7:30 pm • ADI Awards Gala Dinner and Auction Wednesday, April 2 8 am Sign-in desk open 8 – 9 am Breakfast 9 am Vendor Booths Open Break-out Sessions • Brewery to Distillery (90 minutes), Panel Discussion: Dick Cantwell of Elysian Brewery, Darek Bell of Corsair Artisan, Brett VanderKamp of New Holland Artisan Spirits and Jason Parker of Copperworks Distilling • Sourcing Aged Whiskey: Richard Wolf, Wolf Consulting • Working with the TTB – a Blueprint for a Contructive Relationship: Robert Lehrman, of Lehrman Beverage Law 10 am • Nosing for Faults (2-hours paid): Nancy Fraley and Julia Nourney • The Right Still for the Right Job: Michael Delevante, of Campari (retired Appleton Estates) • Becoming USDA Certified Organic: Keith Barnes of Bainbridge Island Distillery • What do successful Big Brands Have in Common?: Scott Shiller of Thoroughbred Brands 11 am • What is Craft? an update of the ADI Certified Craft Spirits Program: panel discussion (90 minutes): Moderated by Andrew Faulkner with Darek Bell of Corsair Artisan, Guy Rehorst of Great Lakes Distilling, Steven Stone of Sound Spirits, Jim Blansit of Copper Run Distillery and Ryan Hembree of Skip Rock Distillers. • Competing with the Big Boys: Martin Pazzani of United Craft Distillers, Inc. • Writing Your Business Plan: Justin Stiefel of Heritage Distilling Co. • Proofing and Gauging Spirits Properly: Jordan Via of Breckenridge Distillery 12 - 2 pm Lunch 12 pm • My Great-grandfather Was the Distiller to the Confederate Army: Paul Caldwell, Confederate Stills of Alabama • Does Your Package Design Fit Your Brand? Tari Gordon of Elite Label and David Cole of David Cole Creative 1 pm • Standing Out on the Shelf: Coordinating Package Design, from the bottle maker to the label printer: panel discussion (90 minute): Erica Harrop, Global Package, David Worrell, of Bochanis Rogan Zoom, Brent Bamberger of Monvera • The Money-Go-Round, tracking the price of a bottle from FOB to the retail shelf: Kurt Charles of Pavilion Brands • How to Get onto My Back Bar, Andrew Friedman, Liberty Bar 2 pm • Micro-oxigenation – a short cut to maturation: Max Buiani, Enartis Vinquiry • Driving Revenue Through Brand Extensions: David Dafoe of Flavorman 3 pm • Botanical Infusion Techniques for Gins (90 minute, Lecture/Tasting): Clay Smith, Corsair Distillery • Monthly Compliance Paperwork: Jim McCoy, Jim McCoy Consultants • Expanding Your Distillery, Panel Discussion (90 minutes): Orlin Sorenson of Woodinville Whiskey, Brady Konya of Middle West Distillery, and Jordan Via of Breckenridge Distillery 4 pm • Controlling Malolactic Fermentation for Brandy: Erica Stancliff of Enartis Vinquiry • Financing Aging Spirits in Barrels – a new source of capital for craft distillers: John Fisher of Fisher and Company 5 pm • Back to Bases, Gin Tasting: David T. Smith, Summer Fruit Cup Thursday, April 3 8 am Buses leave to Woodinville for day 2 of the Amaro Workshop and to Gig Harbor for three-day whiskey distilling workshop 10 am – 4 pm One-day Hands-on Distilling workshops • Hands-on Malt Whiskey Workshop at Westland Distilling: Matt Hoffman, Westland Distilling • Hands-on Gin Distilling Workshop at Captive Spirits: David T Smith and Ben Capdevielle, Captive Spirits • Hands-on Vodka Distilling Workshop: Graham Hamblett and Mike Sherlock, Fremont Mischief Distillery • Hands-on Rum Distilling Workshop at 3 Howls: Eric Watson instructor • Mashing-in for Whiskey at Elysian Brewery: Jason Parker of Copperworks Distilling • Whiskey and Rum Blending Workshop: Nancy Fraley instructor at the Seattle Sheraton • Working with Grape Varietals for Brandy: Hubert Germain-Robin instructor at the Seattle Sheraton
  13. Registration is now open for ADI's 8th Annual Judging of Craft American Spirits. The judging has now expanded to include all classes of spirits. If it is make in America by small-batch, independently-owned distilleries, we will evaluate it. For more information, go to: http://distilling.com/events/judging-craft-spirits/ 8TH ANNUAL JUDGING OF CRAFT AMERICAN SPIRITS The American Distilling Institute will judge artisan American gins, rums, fruit infusions, brandies, moonshines and whiskies. Select judges will perform a blind tasting of spirits submitted. Location: Seattle Washington Judging Dates: February 10-12, 2014 Submission Deadline Date: Friday, January 31, 2014 Submissions must be received by: Thursday, February 6, 2014 Entry Fee: $200 per spirit entered The purpose of this judging is to help promote the American craft distillers that are producing the finest quality artisan spirits and to give participating distillers valuable, unbiased, third-party feedback on the quality and process of their spirits. Gold, silver and bronze medals will be awarded with certificates and bottle-stickers made available for spirits judged worthy of recognition. All entrants will receive tasting notes with comments from the spirits judges. Judges reserve the right to not award medals when, in their opinion, no spirits in that category merit an award. Medals will be announced at the American Distilling Institute’s Annual Conference & Vendor Expo, March 31-April 2, 2014 in Seattle, WA. Spirits Categories & Classifications Spirits in each class will be categorized as is appropriate for the entries received so that like spirits are tasted in the same flight. The prospective categories are; Whiskey Clear Whiskey Aged Corn Whiskey Bourbon (under two years) Straight Bourbon Rye Whiskey (under two years) Straight Rye Whiskey Malt Whiskey (under two years) Straight Malt Whiskey Wheat Whiskey (under two years) Straight Wheat Whiskey Blended Whiskey Whiskey Non-typical Smoked Whiskey Hopped Whiskey Flavored Whiskey Moonshine Sugarshine Corn Whiskey Moonshine Other Moonshine Aged Moonshine Flavored Moonshine Brandy Pear Eau de Vie Eaux de Vie (other) Grappa Applejack/Apple Brandy Aged brandy (other than grape or apple) Brandy from Grapes (aged less than six years) Brandy from Grapes (aged six years or more) Rum White Rum (Agricole, ECJ, sugar, molasses) Amber Rum (Agricole, ECJ, sugar, molasses) Dark Rum (Agricole, ECJ, sugar, molasses) Overproof Rum Flavored Rum Spiced Rum Gin Classic Distilled Gin Classic Rectified Gin Contemporary Distilled Gin Contemporary Rectified Gin Genever Navy-Strength Gin Old Tom Gin Barrel-Aged Gin Vodka New-made Vodka (from Barley, Corn, Rye, Wheat, Other Grain, Grape, Apple, Fruit, Potato, or Cane) Rectified Vodka (from Barley, Corn, Rye, Wheat, Other Grain, Grape, Apple, Fruit, Potato, or Cane) Flavored vodka Aquavit Liqueurs Fruit Liqueur Citrus Liqueur Herbal/Botanical/Spiced Liqueur Coffee Liqueur Cream Liqueur Mistel, Pommeau, Pineau Nut Liqueur Cordial Gin Other Liqueur Vermouth (and other fortified wines and aperitifs) Other Absinthe Agave Spirits Amaro Barrel-Aged Cocktails Bitters (digestif and aperitif) Non-potable bitters Tinctures Soju Schnapps Moonshine will loosely be defined as spirits marketed as moonshine. ADI will accept spirits distilled from sugar or grain (or hybrids of either) that the TTB has designated as Distilled Spirits Specialty. Also, any clear whiskey or whiskey, on which the words moon or shine, or which contains clear references toward moonshine on the label, will be allowed in this category provided it is designated at the time of registration. Packaging Award ADI will also award innovative packaging. Bottles will be judges on overall originality, creativity, graphic design, integration of bottle design to label style, and aesthetic appeal. Each spirit submitted for judging will also be considered for the packaging award. Producers who wish to enter spirits for whom there is no category, may enter bottles for only the packaging award. The Judging Director reserves the right to create new categories and to categorize entries as is appropriate for spirits entered. _____________________________________________________________
  14. There are still a few more seats left for the Hands-on Whiskey Distilling Workshop, December 8-13, 2014, at Heritage Distilling Co., Gig Harbor WA. http://distilling.com/workshops.html Instructors: Jordan Via, of Breckenridge Distillery Justin Stiefel of Heritage Distilling Co. with Nancy Fraley, Sensory Analysis & Blending for Craft Distillers This hands-on class covers the fundamentals of grain-to-bottle whiskey production and business concerns in starting a distilled spirits plant. Participants will be able to smell and taste new make spirit as it is being distilled. Topics covered in this class include mash preparation, basics of fermentation and wash production, anatomy of a still, mechanics of distillation (stripping & spirit runs), “making the cuts,” barrel maturation, proofing, and bottling. Sensory evaluation instruction includes traditional philosophies and methods of blending whiskey, practical applications of blending, selecting and balancing the proper components to achieve a targeted flavor profile, and the impact of spirit and wood on flavor. Additional presentations for the start-up distiller include licensing, still design, record keeping, package design, formula and label approval, and marketing spirits. Accommodations for five nights at The Inn at Gig Harbor. Your reservations will be made & confirmed for you at time of registration. Costs: $3,500 fee includes instruction, 5 nights in hotel, airport shuttles, tastings and most meals.
  15. Registration is now open for the American Distilling Institute is pleased to announce the 2012 Judging of Artisan American Spirits at Huber’s Starlight Distillery February 27-28, 2012. Rums, Brandies and Whiskies will be judged in a blind tasting by a panel of select judges. Deadline to register spirits is Friday January 27, 2012. Rums will be judged in the following categories; Clear Rum Amber Rum Aged Rum Overproof Rum Spiced Rum Fruit-flavored Rum Whiskies will be judged in the following categories: Malt Whiskey Bourbon Wheat Whiskey Corn Whiskey Rye Whiskey Un-aged Whiskey Other Whiskey Brandies will be judged in the following categories; Brandy from grapes Grappa Aged brandy from other fruits (apple, cherry, peach, pear, plum, raspberry and other) Un-aged brandy from other fruits (apple, cherry, peach, pear, plum, raspberry and other) Fruit Infusions (fruit infusions into a fruit-based spirit) ADI will evaluate spirits made in one DSP in separate categories from those from products that include spirits distilled at other facilities. Packaging Award -- ADI will also award innovative packaging. Bottles will be judged on overall originality, creativity, graphic design, integration of bottle design to label style, and aesthetic appeal. Each spirit submitted for judging will also be considered for the packaging award. Producers who wish to enter spirits for whom there is no category, may enter bottles for only the packaging award. Deadline for sprits registration is Friday, January 27, 2012. All spirits must arrive in Indiana for judging by Friday February 10, 2012 to be considered - no exceptions. Judging will be held Monday-Tuesday, February 27-28 at Huber’s Starlight Distillery in Borden, IN. Medals will be announced at ADI’s annual conference, April 1-4, 2012 in Louisville, Kentucky. For complete information go to http://www.distilling.com Only craft producers who are 2012 ADI members are eligible for entry. For questions that are not answered there, contact ADI’s Judging Director Andrew Faulkner drew@distilling.com, 415-517-7377.