Scott @ Twenty2Vodka

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About Scott @ Twenty2Vodka

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  1. Freaking Hilarious. I'm sure you will rest well knowing you have nick jone's applause. I suspect it was more of a golf-clap than a standing ovation. Make sure you put that on the outside of your bottle, it will definitely help you sell bottles. Definitely. For the record, "this resource" is not ADI, nor the forum. It (the resource) is the information contained within the forum, volunteered by the participants. I have definitely given more than i've received from this forum. Unless you count the junk mail I've received from selling my mailing address to suppliers i have no interest in dealing with. Pretty much done with this bs. <golf-clap> Peace out. -Scott
  2. wow. your english is good enough to curse i guess. Every time someone answered your question, you insisted on wanting a simpler answer. It takes a calculation to "fill in your blanks". And if you aren't willing to fill in the easy early blanks now, you are going to have a very unpleasant time with all of the other harder blanks that are still in front of you. Again, best of luck, you are going to need it. (I'm talking about the luck). -Scott
  3. In my opinion, the price per piece you are telling me is about 1/3 of what I would have guessed. I've talked with other manufacturers, and I'm pretty sure I'm not getting ripped off on my glass price.... So, sounds like you may have found a deal, but then again, you don't have any glass in hand yet either.... Just throwing some caution out there while you are still in the planning stages for this part of it, there is a significant chance that your glass prices are going to be alot higher than $1.25 each, and if you can work some cushions into your financials in case, you can always put them into marketing if you don't need them.... Best of luck, -Scott
  4. The answer is not "simple". The math to derive the answer, however, is simple. Except the math takes work. And so does distilling... If you are not a distiller, nor a brewer, then what are you doing here? And if you are legitimately trying to get into the business, then it only gets harder from here. Posts like this piss me off and continuing to insist that you want a simpler answer devalues the work real people on the forum put in every day. Best of luck, you are going to need it. -Scott
  5. can you post a picture of the bottle design you are rejecting? I'm curious to see the design to understand the importance of lines inside the bottle.... perhaps your design is too complicated? Could you get by with a perfect outside shape, and then convey the lines using a shrink wrap label, or some other form of decoration? Also, do you have a ballpark of the per-piece cost you are anticipating on paying for your custom design? I currently go with a stock shape from Bruni, and the glass/decoration is one of the most expensive components of the assembly...more than fed excise tax... I considered doing a custom bottle before i was in production, and looking back, I am grateful I do not have to pay the custom bottle price, nor have the overhead of a custom mold on my books. If you are curious what my bottle looks like, visit www.twenty2vodka.com and scroll down a bit after confirming your age. Thanks! -Scott
  6. can you post a picture of the bottle design you are rejecting? I'm curious to see the design to understand the importance of lines inside the bottle.... perhaps your design is too complicated? Could you get by with a perfect outside shape, and then convey the lines using a shrink wrap label, or some other form of decoration? Also, do you have a ballpark of the per-piece cost you are anticipating on paying for your custom design? I currently go with a stock shape from Bruni, and the glass/decoration is one of the most expensive components of the assembly...more than fed excise tax... I considered doing a custom bottle before i was in production, and looking back, I am grateful I do not have to pay the custom bottle price, nor have the overhead of a custom mold on my books. If you are curious what my bottle looks like, visit www.twenty2vodka.com and scroll down a bit after confirming your age. Thanks! -Scott
  7. I think http://bevforce.com/ will be your best resource for the "salaries" information you are looking for. Unfortunately, as Two Bit began to point out, the variables that go into each operation's setup will vary so greatly that there is no way for anyone here to answer your question accurate to your situation. Employees are one of the most expensive things you will have to deal with when you are operating, and my suggestion is plan on having as few as possible for as long as possible. I wrote an extensively detailed business plan (75+ pages before it turned into a 10page executive summary) and I don't recall having any more detail about employees in it beyond "3-5 projected after a couple years growth". Unless you are writing your plan for some local area development commission who will want to see a jobs projection because that's one of the things they are measured on, I'd keep the employee part of your plan very lean. Btw, we don't have 3-5 employees, we have just 1 (not counting my wife and myself). And that person's job is selling, hand shaking, selling, outreach, selling, visiting accounts, selling, selling, and selling. Best of luck, -Scott
  8. We have attended WSWA twice as guests walking around the expo and sometimes into the hospitality suites (before they noticed we were distillers too). We wanted to get a feel for what others do in preparation for setting up our own exhibit booth and hospitality suites down the road. A couple lessons we learned from our attendance: 1.) Exhibiting at WSWA can be a valuable experience if your company is prepared to take the leap into real distribution. By prepared for real distribution, I'm mean specifically having an actual ability to produce quantity, and having real marketing and sales $$ at the ready to dump into each market you propose to enter. 2.) The hospitality suites are where actual deals get done, and what the brokers look forward to visiting the most so they can get some special attention. Without the suite, I don't think exhibiting is worth the time to attend. I think we calculated the cost of setting up an exhibit booth (10'x10'), plus having the smallest hospitality suite available, and 3 people there to try and manage both came in at like $17,000... That's not accounting for the exhibit materials, pos give aways, travel, meals, etc, etc, etc. But a deal into a new state with a broker excited about adding you to their portfolio would obviously make up for the expense.... As for NightClub and Bar, we attended one of those (i don't think it was an official NightClub and Bar show), but it was in the Jarvis Convention center in NYC. There were some seminars that were useful, Dale Degroff and Jr. Marino each hosted ones we attended. However the crowd was really more focused on the serving side of the game. If your product isn't available in the market they work in, then there is really nothing that can happen. I've had lots of people tell me "Hey, I know a bunch of bar managers in XYZ state, you should totally get your vodka there", but unfortunately it just doesn't work that way in our industry (as i'm sure most everyone on this forum already knows). If you already have the distribution setup with a broker who actually services popular locations, than attending a convention like NightClub and bar could potentially be valuable... So, in my opinion, If you company has the resources and is ready to make the leap, WSWA is where it happens. Also, congrats on your Double Gold at SF this year. -Scott
  9. you can assign the still a serial number of your choosing and use that. Same with your other tanks. They just want a list of your equipment so they can calculate the max tax liability you might owe and ensure your bond covers it. The SN is really only necessary for if/when they come in and inspect.
  10. have you tried reaching out to Scott at Catoctin Creek directly? You can try their facebook page --> https://www.facebook.com/catoctincreek or their twitter account --> https://twitter.com/catoctincreek . Of course, then there is their dot-com too at: http://catoctincreekdistilling.com/ Best of Luck, -Scott
  11. we sourced ours from our local water treatment guy (everyone up here has a water softener). regarding specific materials, I don't recall for this unit that we were too picky on the actual material. I can tell you it's blue, and looking at mcmaster carr, it looks like we have one of the "light blocking blue" filters. The cartridge that goes in it is like a tightly wound spool of twine, again pretty standard from what I recall. My reference to mcmaster carr was more for the style that we use, and now thinking this through, part num 44075K21 is very likely what we are using for this stage of our filtering process, though with a cartridge that filters down to 5 micron. If this unit was a special material for ethanol, i think it (and the cost of such) would be sticking out in my mind a little more....sorry but that's as specific as I can get without diving into our records to find the actual purchase receipt. Like i said, this part of it is really more simple than it sounds. We are filtering vodka, so any transfer of taste would certainly convey. If you are filtering something with character (like a barrel aged spirit), and the intent is to remove particles as you described in the OP, i believe this type of filter should work just fine. -Scott
  12. we pass our vodka through a particulate filter like the ones available here: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-water-filtration-devices/=md40ae The cartridges let you choose the micron rating you want to filter down to, I think we only filter 5 micron which has been just fine at removing carbon dust from our chill-filtration process. We push the liquid through using a pneumatic diaphragm pump with standard NPT fittings. Really more simple than it sounds. Best of luck, -Scott
  13. As a new supplier writing a business plan, I suggest projecting to get about 50% of the final (target) shelf price. For example, if the target shelf price of your high quality rum is going to be $30 per unit, project in your plan to receive about $15 per unit. The other $15 is going to go to broker markups, retail markups, and state excise tax. Once you are up and running, the $ you receive as supplier will likely be a little more than 50%, but you will look like a superstar if you make more than you project vs the other way around. Best of luck, -Scott
  14. Don't underestimate the value of your time moving everything out, painting, letting it dry, moving everything back in, and then freaking out over that first inevitable scratch or scuff.... In my 4 years operating todate, there are just sooooooo many other things to worry over. -Scott
  15. I would suggest leaving the concrete be (as in bare if that's what's there now) so that you can treat the floor like a floor, and not worry over scratches or spills which are bound to happen. Best of luck, -Scott