3d0g

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3d0g last won the day on May 16

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About 3d0g

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  1. 17 - 3.5 brix is 79% apparent attenuation. ec 1118 is specd at 75% average, so yay?
  2. I suspect you'll find a little chiller that can move 10K BTU/hr is far cheaper than the labor to install geo.
  3. The napkin-math is pretty simple. It takes 8.33 BTU to change 1 gallon of water 1 degree. So, 1000 gallons from 65-80F means you've got a bank of 125K BTU. Cooling 200 gal from 150 to 80 costs 117K BTU. Actual time to cool is variable, depending on heat exchanger efficiency, etc. Redirecting 1st couple hundred gallons will definitely help but how much? The math gets hairy. Harder question is, how long will it take for the tank to return to ambient?
  4. ES / LPS are actually hard to find used. Look for EE. More common and exceeds the required OSHA rating.
  5. You're going through all the thought processes I did Jesse. Condenser is easy. Anything that can cool to < 140F will work; heck even a car radiator and good fan in a loop with the condenser input and output would work. Cooling several hundred gallons of mash in a timely fashion is a different kettle of fish though. LOT of BTUs to move. What's the ground temp there in the summer? Say it's 65F and you're trying to cool mash to 80F - 15 degree delta isn't a lot to work with.
  6. You should have no issues with the relatively small cooling demands of a condenser. I wanted to drop a 1,000 gal tank underground for condenser AND mash cooling. After talking to a couple geothermal experts, they said it would take several days for the full tank to drop back to ambient, which meant I'd need a separate process to cool the tank back down anyway. We ended up going the dry cooler route. Simple and relatively inexpensive.
  7. US-FIP 20035? http://www.americanwinepump.com/products.html
  8. This one was a bit of a head scratcher for me too. How much is the TTB looking for? I just submitted the bank statements as requested.
  9. Anything over 240 closed 1B / 1C in a sprinklered control area, regardless of container type (barrels excepted, of course), would be H3. Not sure of a way around that. Pretty much any fire AHJ will know the MAQ rules.
  10. Where's 90 gal come from? Code states max open containers of Class 1B or 1C liquids is 60 gal (sprinklered) and 30 gal (non-sprinklered) per control area. So set your process to dump the spirit receivers to closed containers prior to reaching the limits, or build separate control areas.
  11. Considering there's still 5% "other stuff" and the human palate can detect down to PPM of a great many compounds, I'd hazard just about anyone could tell the difference, side by side.
  12. Not an expert, but I believe it varies by IBC manufacturer? http://www.jmesales.com/catalog/ibcs-totes-tank-accessories,7285.htm
  13. Besides taste, a red oak barrel would be empty by morning. Red oak cannot hold liquids.