MichaelAtTCW

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MichaelAtTCW last won the day on February 24

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About MichaelAtTCW

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    http://www.tcwequipment.com

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  1. Well… we do sell cartridge housings and the filters. From pretty basic/cheap housings where you can set them up in series, to cart-mounted 2x30" housings that can filter in series or parallel, to a full 2 x 30" system with integrated air diaphragm pump, like the one pictured right. I don't know much about the Shelco housings you link to. I do know that the style they sell isn't as popular in the beverage industry. It looks like the kind where the filter seal is dependent on how tightly you close the housing. That's pretty common for cheaper filtration setups, but in the beverage industry housings that have twist and lock bases are more common, as they tend to be more reliable. That said, we do sell the same style as the ones you link to for the cost-conscious. It's the polypropylene housing Silk City Distillers references above, also known as an Ametek housing As far as filters, we sell Graver filters. Ther cartridge filters are great – priced well and made in the USA. As I said, we sell a lot of them to distilleries. The number of filters you use and their micron rating depends on what you're trying to remove – large particles (floaties), sub-optical particles (haze), invisible particles (yeast, spoilage bacteria), or some combination of all of the above. Give us a call if you want to talk it over: 707-963-9681
  2. Not to respond to a thread hijack, but yes they will. Without seeing the housing I can't say that with 100% certainty, but AM is a pretty common end cap configuration with plastic housings like you find in water filters, etc.
  3. Are you looking at a 40 x 40, a 20 x 20, or…? Also, SCD is right. A lot of product gets left behind in sheet filters. Depending on how much you're processing at a time, you might consider cartridge filters. We sell a lot of these to distillers, who like them because relatively little product gets left behind, and you can even blow the remainder through with inert gas to get every last drop, if you want.
  4. Wow, interesting! Those are some beefy washers as well. I definitely won't tell people that the Mori Filler is for mason jars, but it looks like it can be done, albeit not perfectly. My hat's off to you. That is some fine MacGyvering.
  5. A few ways to find out if a hose has plasticizers in it: Talk to the hose manufacturer, or read their spec sheet, if available. Talk to the company distributing the hose. So, in this case head down to the Home Depot and ask one of the orange aprons. Have it analyzed by a laboratory. Not a way to test for plasticizers, but for other adverse effects: soak it for a week or two in vodka. We don't sell a PE hose for distillery use. Regular old PE will likely stiffen and craze after prolonged exposure to Ethanol.
  6. The whole kit with the manifolds, caps, hose, and connectors to run in-line to the Mori Filler's pump would run $395 for a Six-Spout Mori, $365 for a Four-Spout Mori. For the first few guinea pigs volunteers willing to use and provide feedback we'd do an early-adopter 20%-off discount. Just send me a message here on the forums, or at michael@tcwequipment.com
  7. In spite of better judgment, perhaps, we went ahead and prototyped up a Clean In-Place system for the Mori Filler. It actually came out pretty well, if I do say so myself! Here's a normal, no-frills Six-Spout Mori Filler: Now we'll attach the first half of the clean in place system to the right-hand nozzles: As you can see, it's basically a stainless steel manifold that locks the nozzles open. While the nozzles are locked open, liquid flows freely. Now let's attach the other half: The two halves clamp together. Now all the nozzles are locked open, so liquid can flow freely through them. As you can see, both ends have standard tri clamp ferrule connections. One end will be closed off with an end cap or valve until you're ready to drain the cleaning solution. The other end will connect directly to the inlet of the Mori Filler's pump that feeds the reservoir. When you're done filling and ready to clean, you can just disconnect your supply tank, connect to the clean in-place system, and add some cleaning product to your reservoir. It will keep recycling the cleaning product through the system for as long as you want. Pretty neat!
  8. Hey CaptnKB, Our Ferrinox labelers have a built-in printing option. The least expensive Ferrinox labeler is the EKO-10, which sounds like it would work fine for your application. We've had these out in the field since the 90s, both for individual users, and for contract/mobile bottlers. They're built like tanks. Let me know if you want a quote. It'd be helpful to see the label, and where you'd like to have the info printed.
  9. What Tom describes is pretty spot-on. There's a saying in breweries: "Making beer is 90% cleaning and 10% paperwork." About the only shortcut is to hire somebody to clean equipment for you and make sure you train them well. Still, the ease of cleaning vs. other gravity fillers is one of the things our customers like about the Mori Filler. Unscrew the nozzles, disassemble them, rinse, and soak them in your desired cleaning solution. Meanwhile, rinse out the reservoir, and clean. Repeat as necessary. You should cycle cleaning solution through the pump too. We've thought about doing a "dummy bottle" CIP system where you put cleaning/rinsing solution into the reservoir, and then hook the dummy bottles up to the nozzles to open them up. A pump would recirculate the rinsing/cleaning solution through the reservoir, the nozzles, and the dummy bottles. You could walk away and leave it to run for a while. That'd get you most of the way there, but you'd probably still have to spend some time with brushes. My main concern is that such a system would likely be cost-prohibitive for most users, and therefore it's not likely we'd sell many.
  10. No problem. I'm curious to know if it will work, myself. I will try to talk the shop into mocking up a prototype. It'd be a neat add-on feature. I know a lot of distilleries like to use mason jars.
  11. I may have talked to you about this already via e-mail. If not, here's what I told someone else who had the same question: The main problem with trying to fill a mason jar with a gravity filler is that the filler needs to create a seal against the jar's mouth in order to work properly. The opening of a normal liquor bottles seals against the nozzle cone on the nozzle shaft. Mason jars, however, have a very wide mouth opening. You'd need to jury-rig your own nozzle cone to create a seal. I found that a size 13 rubber stopper like this might actually do the trick. It could seal against the mouth of a normal mason jar with a 2.75" opening. So you would just need to take off the standard red nozzle cone, drill a hole in the center of the #13 rubber stopper to let it fit around the shaft of the nozzle, and start filling. You might need to add something like a large stainless steel washer for extra support to prevent the stopper from bending upwards. See the attached very rough sketch. All this said, we've never tried it before, so I can't say for sure if it will work or not. The Mori Filler is definitely not designed out-of-the box for mason jars, though with some ingenuity you may be able to get it to work.
  12. Glad it's worked well for you! What you're describing regarding disassembly is pretty easy to achieve, I think. Just loosen the rinser body's height adjustment knob (see the attached picture) and pull the body up and out. You'll have to disconnect the the hoses, of course, but they're all push-connect for easy-on/easy-off. Still, adding a tri clamp drain at the bottom of the keg is actually a really great idea, and something I'll talk to the shop about doing on future units. If you ever have some downtime with it, please send the keg part back to us and we'll add the port free of charge.
  13. Don't worry, you're definitely not the first
  14. No worries
  15. Equivalent? Eh, I don't think so. I designed the MiniMax myself with an eye toward Keeping the costs low, but not sacrificing on quality of parts Ensuring everything would have excellent compatibility with high-proof spirits Be easy to clean and disassemble Be ergonomic and adjustable for long bottling sessions Use intrinsically safe or explosion-proof parts on the pneumatic version I'm sure you can make a cheap bottle rinser that runs in a closed loop, but it won't be equivalent to ours.