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Found 12 results

  1. Hi everyone, I've been barreling bourbon for a little over a year now in 15 gallon barrels. My oldest barrels are about 13 months. I have a few questions about knowing when they've reached their peak quality and should be removed. 1) How long do people typically age product in 15 gal barrels to get the HIGHEST quality bourbon. If time was not a factor. I'm in the northeast US, we get all 4 seasons and have big seasonal temp swings. I realize this question can vary depending on a lot of different factors. Just a ballpark range would be helpful. 2) How would you describe the taste when it gets too oaky? Is the oak bitter? Acidic? Any obvious tasting notes? 3) I've noticed in my 5L barrel it will get worse, better, then really bad (I was afraid it was too oaky but let it ride) then REALLY good. Is it the same with larger barrels? If it starts to taste bitter or a barrel from a month earlier tastes more pleasant should i just empty the barrel? Or let it ride and move on to the next phase? Winter is taking hold here, so the aging process may more or less halt until spring since our rick-house is not insulated. Cheers!
  2. The Slow Distillation Movement Hubert Germain-Robin Being an aficionado of the Slow Food Movement since the beginning, I would like to add another antidote to the tyranny of the fast food industry and the frenzied pace of modern culture. Slow Distillation By using ancestral methods of distillation, when time was not such a pressing issue, one would conduct the distillation at a slow pace to be able to separate with precision the different components, to make clean cuts and to respect the temperature during the gathering of the distillates. With today’s hurried approach, many of these parameters are undervalued or even ignored by craft distillers. For centuries, distillers passed down to successive generations the nuances of creating flavors from the materials available. These artisans created good spirits before thermometers were invented, not understanding the molecular difference between methanol and ethanol or even knowing the names and vapor temperatures of any of the compounds they were separating. Distillers must listen to a spirit coming off the still in order to understand how much time in the barrel it will take for flavors to blossom and come to full beauty. Little thought or teaching is currently given to the understanding of how to ferment and distill a spirit when one intends to age it for 4, 12, or even 20 years. The rapidly made products often seen today have a limited appeal to consumers who pay attention to what they are drinking. This commodity approach to spirits production may produce a few small fortunes, but will no doubt produce many more inferior products that will need the presence of a bartender to bring to full flavor. Slow Maturation: By learning from the experience of generations of cellar masters, one realizes that time and patience are factors you cannot fully control, except by having proper levels of humidity and temperature in your cellar. Forcing the aging process by raising temperatures and using smaller barrels (which are usually made of wood of lesser quality) to obtain faster extraction often results in harsh and excessive tannins, which will take many years for the spirit to digest. Balance and harmony are reached by knowing the pace of transformations occurring in the barrels through the periods of oxidation and of rest. This is necessary and elementary to have a quality product. In the modern distillery age, the distiller is more likely to be flooded with information about saturating their spirit quickly with wood extract to make it marketable than they are presented with information about how to slowly nurture barrels into producing a supple, round, full flavor from the depth of years. Consequently, today’s distiller is more likely to toss their precious water of life into barrels and forget about it for two years, or for six years, and with little regard to maintaining proper maturation conditions, whatever the recipe, like a cake baking in the oven for whatever amount of time. By making abstraction of, or simply ignoring, either slow distillation or slow maturation, these craftsmen limit themselves in creating true artisan products. The consequences are not always obvious in the short term but appear later, resulting in regrets and disappointments. Remember: In this long journey, you cannot go back in time; you have to live with your decisions—good or bad. Can a rum or whiskey, after being stored in a barrel for only a year, truly be called mature or aged when, at the same time, a brandy, Cognac, Calvados or Scotch (and many other spirits) have to rest at least 2.5 years in oak (which is still quite young) to get the due appellation? I urge the distiller to slow down, take a mindful approach and join in the sharing of small details that, when combined together, have the effect of creating a spirit that can be savored. At the beginning of this revolution—which will go on for years, decades and centuries—the foundation can be laid so that craft will become the designation of quality. Rules should be put in place—by the craft distilling industry itself—to establish control over the declaration and on the labels for the consumer’s good. The Europeans have put a strict system in place that could be used as an example to make designations fair for everyone. Such a system will also serve to elevate quality, and reinforce appellations and sub-appellations, that will be created in the near future. For more information, email: Hubert Germain-Robin hubertgermainrobin@gmail.com Nancy Fraley nancylfraley@yahoo.com Andrew Faulkner drew@distilling.com
  3. Hi - Kelly here from Black Water Barrels. We are a brand new cooperage located on the East coast in South Carolina. I'm here to learn from you all, and to contribute when I can. Usually when I say I am from a new barrel company people want to know how they can order (barrels aren't so easy for craft brewers/distillers to come by!) Here is the contact information: Greg Pierce, President 803-465-3865 Melissa Stokes, Sales 803-312-1343 Thanks, and I am looking forward to working with all of you. Kelly BlackWaterBarrels.com
  4. Looking for 200L to 300L stainless steel tanks (loose lid or floating lid ok) for our lab R&D. LD Carlson is out of their Marchisio tanks the duration, and others are too pricey for what they are. Immediate need, will carry shipping cost. Thanks!
  5. It would be a tough sell because I can or anyone can buy sea salt buy the pound and mix it in to the spirit. Why Would I want to buy a special barrel with it in it. And on the cellular level??? Really, here is how I look at it... Wood, just like many other plants is made of cells or pockets. Not like human cells. Anyway, mix up salt and water and pour it on the wood. The cells absorb the liquid, water dies out, salt left in cells. Or Look at it this way.... When we where all little kids we put the potato in the bowl full of food coloring and in the potato turned that particular color. Same thing with sea salt..... Two big problems I see is 1. formula required 2. it would throw the specific gravity of your alcohol off. You would never be able to tell true proof unless you had special equipment. This is the biggest joke I have ever heard of. If you have ever bought one of these barrels you need to get your head checked! P.S. If you did..... well your a moron.
  6. I have just received a shipment from Spain of Oloroso Sherry casks of three different sizes, 64 liter, 125 liter and 225, supply is limited and sales will be on a first come first serve basis. These casks are of excellent quality, finished and sanded by the manufacture, and are a once used Oloroso. Please contact us at Speyside Cooperage Kentucky Inc. for priceing http://speysidecooperageky.com/, speysidecooperage@windstream.net
  7. Can someone recommend a few good technical books on the topics of spirit blending and aging?
  8. I work at a distillery in California, we currently store our barrels on their heads on custom made pallets. All fine and dandy, they are 5'x5' pallets and they work just fine. The two problems I have with them: 1) They take a lot of time to construct where I could be doing more important things around the distillery. 2) Being larger than standard size, they take up more space and pose challenges to moving logistics and destroy our storage efficiency. Having seen other distilleries and rickhouses where they also store their barrels on their heads, I noticed that not only do they use pallets that are standard size, but they were bought in bulk. Taking care of both of my issues. The question I have is if anyone is familiar with a pallet supplier for these purposes? Is there a well-known/industry standard company that I am unaware of? Any help would be great and I thank you in advance! EDIT: Sorry for the duplicate, moderators feel free to delete this thread.
  9. I will personally be inspecting and hand picking out the following barrels in France, Portugal, Spain and Madeira in mid August. They will only then be emptied, repaired if needed and shipped over. The prices below include ALL foreign transport fees, customs in both countries, USA fees, ocean transport and domestic transport to Denver. All that's left is getting them to you from Colorado. Pictures, Producers and more info available upon request. Tawny Port Wine barrel 225Ltr: $440.48 Madeira Wine barrel 225Ltr $433.82 Cognac Cask 270Ltr $495.00 Muscat Cask 400Ltr: $440.00 Oloroso Sherry Cask 500Ltr: $652.00 Carcavelos Wine 225Ltr: $413.35 Sauternes Wine 228Ltr: $379.00 Skyler Weekes o. 720-220-5184 e. sky@rockymountainbarrelcompany.com w. www.rockymountainbarrelcompany.com
  10. Hey everyone, I have a client that is thinking about aging some grappa i made for them, but as i have never really put anything into wood, i must admit i am at a loss on how to counsel them. I was hoping there might be some folks on here willing to share some information/technique I believe most spirits go into wood around 138 proof, is that about right? and if thats the case, would the same application apply to grappa? Im not yet sure which kind of barrel they are planning to use, if they will be used wine barrels, new barrels, etc, and i know that will affect the technique to a degree, but for the moment i am just looking for advice on the dilution side of things. Anyone have any insight to share, or willing to point me in the right direction? Thanks much Dave Jr
  11. Greetings Having forecasted a shortage in wood, and an increase in demand, we took the initiative to prepare We are currently taking on a limited number of new customers, as our capacity has recently increased Investments in new machinery, wood sourcing, and new leadership in the cooperage have all contributed to this Currently we have 2 pallets (36/pallet) 10 gal char #3, and 3 pallets (60/pallet) 5 gallon char #3 in stock The barrels are all 2 year air dried American white oak email or call for pricing these barrels will not be around very long richard@thebarrelmill.com, 800-201-7125 Also we have 24 refurbished 2 barrel (53-60 gal size) metal racks (black) ready ot ship out Cheers Richard Hobbs The Barrel Mill www.whiskeybarrel.com
  12. Anyone experience with aging their spirit in previously used bourbon barrels? If so, I am curious about the number of uses that can be expected. I know the extraction of flavors will decrease with each fill and empty, but is there any kind of rule-of-thumb here? Any help will be greatly appreciated. The cost of barrel experiments in Hawaii is quite a bit higher on the mainland due to our outrageous shipping costs. I would like to simply avoid any obvious mistakes.