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Found 7 results

  1. Continuous Column Still FOR SALE

    A. The system was designed for around 200 gallons per hour of feed at around 10% alcohol. I do not think it is all that important how much alcohol is in the wash, but the feed rate can be probably a low of 100 to maybe a high of 250-300. At a 200 gallon-per-hour feed rate, that would be slightly over three gallons a minute going in. The product passes through a pipe in a pipe heat exchanger where it would be heated up from the fermentation temperature to approximately 150°F entering the top of the beer column. I would recommend you set the pipe in a pipe heat exchanger horizontal rather than vertical. In the event you shut it down without completely emptying it, you will not plug it up in the bottom elbows. B. The steam addition to the unit would be around 300 pounds per hour, the equivalent of about 10 horsepower of steam. A 22 horse power boiler unit that would run at about eight to 10 usage with plenty of steam for mashing. This steam should heat the bottom of the column to approximately 215-217°F, and I would have a dial thermometer at the bottom or a couple of plates up from the bottom of this column to validate that temperature for good viewing from ground level. You will also run about three psig in the bottom of the beer column when all of the trays are adequately filled. The steam can be controlled with a control valve to temperature at the bottom of the column or manually run with a hand-operated steam globe valve. If you are feeding the column with a positive displacement pump of some kind, like a Tuthill or something along those lines, you can also run the steam in manual and the column will be fairly stable. C. The 200 gallons an hour input, minus the ethanol boiled out, plus the direct inject steam condensate will result in approximately 200 gallons an hour out the bottom of the beer column. This product will be approximately 215°F, and when it cross-flows with the beer going in, it will be cooled down to somewhere around 150°F. Again, I would recommend a small lobe pump (Tuthill or equal) to pump the bottom product--a VFD drive on the electric motor will allow for variable speed?and take the product through the heat exchanger and discharged. The vapors off the top of the beer column are then transferred through the three-inch line to the bottom of the rectifier, and they will be approximately 100 proof. D. The bottom product off the rectifier column, which is the second column, will be approximately 100 proof and will return back to the top of the beer column. This system originally had a 1/8th horsepower centrifugal pump that pumped off the bottom of the rectifier to the top of the beer column and was more of a continuous running, maintain empty function. In order to make the 190 proof off the top of the rectifier column, there was cooling of the vapors to create a certain level of reflux. That would be for every three gallons of vapor going up the column, two gallons were condensed and returned back down the column for cooling. This was accomplished by controlling the flow of water through the coil in the top of the rectifier column coming in at (E) and coming out at (F). The flow here is calculated to be about 20 gallons per minute with a 20° temperature rise. Since this is making whiskey there is no need to run water through points (E) and (F). The vapors off the top of the rectifier column go over to the condenser where the final ethanol vapors are condensed. The flow in the product condenser, on the other hand, is not controlled. G & H. The cooling water going into (G) would be somewhere around 15 gallons per minute, and it would have about a 10° temperature rise at that flow rate. It would come out at (H) and either go to drain or to some type of a small cooling tower. Either way, this does give you a general idea of the water needed for the condenser. Below G&H will be another set of condensing tubes. If you return some product from the bottom of the beer column to this set of tubes, it will evaporate the heads and allow you to collect from the top copper tube on the side of the condenser. The copper tube below that is really for temp reassurance. I. Based on the 200 gallons an hour input at 10% ethanol, you will have somewhere between 20 and 22 gallons per hour of ethanol produced from (I) at 140-160 proof. The bottom part of that condenser was intended to be a small reservoir to hold the product. Then it was pumped from there to storage somewhere. For info - pjc@taconicdistillery.com $15K OBO
  2. Vodka production...

    My family is getting into the spirits industry and i have been tasked specifically with vodka production. Im new to the spirits industry but i do have a degree in chemistry which i assume could benefit me in this industry and im sure will help me to understand some of the lingo that is used by you fellow alcohol connoisseurs. Now lets get to why I've started this thread. I've been doing research and what i have found is that the type of still needed and the type of starch source used is very important. Can anyone tell me the best type of still to be used to produce premium grade vodka and if its a column still, how many plates does it need to have? Grey Goose advertise that they distill there spirit 5 times; do they have a big column still with enough plates to only have to run it once to achieve the 5 distillations? Grey Goose uses winter wheat for there source of starch, is that the best to use? I know you can use potatoes, grapes and all sorts of other things. i was just wondering what the best to use is. If you have to actually re run each run then do you cut the heads and tails before pouring back into the still? last thing i couldn't understand was how a continuous running fermenter works? Again, Grey goose can have a batch ready every 30 ours with their fermenter system.
  3. SOLD We are currently in the process of switching our distillation equipment to focus more on our farm and micro-malting facility instead of contract distilling. This equipment would be an incredible package for contract distilling, a distillery looking to expand, or a winery/distillery. Individual equipment prices are listed below. The entire package is listed at. We will consider any and all offers. Please feel free to PM, reply, or email adam.stumpf (at) stumpysspirits.com with any questions or for pics. - Continuous Column Still - 40 plate continuous column still that includes boiler with steam heat exchanger, wash pre-heater, 2 columns, condenser, and piping. The still is broken up into 2 15' columns that are 12" in diameter to save on ceiling height. Still has ability to fractionate. Still is currently being used to strip low wines. Stripping 8% wash at 25+ gallons per hour of distillate at ~110 proof. Still was previously used to run apple brand and produced 15 gallons per hour of 160 proof hearts. Pressure relief valve, pressure gauge, and thermos included. - 650 Gallon Pot Still w/ 5 Plate Column - Heated via steam coil. Pneumatic agitator. 4" bottom drain and 2" side drain. Copper dephlegmator at top of column. All stainless construction. Column has structured copper mesh. Also have copper sheet to place behind steam coils for spirit runs. Will include ~75 lb of copper sheet with the still. Comes with 3 condensers. Currently running small 316 stainless condenser that does just fine. Also have 2 larger 304 condensers. Capable of hitting vodka proof in 3 runs.Still outfitted with pressure relief valve, pressure gauge, and thermos. - 1,000 Gallon Mash Tun - 1,000 Gallon Pfaudler tank with 2hp 220 3 phase agitator. 6" drain reduced to 4" reduced to 1.5". Steam jacket. Cooling jacket. Hinged lid. Ladder. CIP ball. As bottom supports for false bottom (false bottom not included). On mild steel stand. - 950 Gallon Variable Capacity Fermenter - Spokane Industries tank. Variable capacity lid w/ good gasket. Air lock, 2" bottom drain, 2" fill port, thermowell w/ thermometer, aeration port, sample port, sloped bottom, dimpled cooling jacket. Stainless construction and sits on mild steel stand. - 800 Gallon Fermenter - Stainless construction with stainless legs. Hinged lid, CIP ball, dished bottom, 1.5" drain, side mounted prop agitator (no motor included), single wall. - Mash Cooling System - Kiesel SP 12 Eccentric Screw Pump, 16' 4" high temp hose, 2 8' sections 4" high temp hose, 2 5' 4" shell in tube heat exchangers - 1,500 Gallon Pasco Poly Tanks - I have 2 of these. Have top and bottom stainless manways as well as 3" and 1.5" tri clamp ports. - GAI 500 Rotary Filler - SOLD - OMB ET 1500 Pressure Sensitive Labeler - SOLD
  4. Hillbilly Stills 26 gal. direct fired electric still with HS5500 controller/element, 6 plate Hillbilly Flute vodka column still with gin basket, sight glass tool, instructional DVD and stainless steel stand. Lightly used (about 6 runs) and decommissioned due to sizing up. Retail is $3,149, but asking $2,750 plus shipping. greg@algodonesdistillery.com or 505.301.9992
  5. I also have a brand new never used custom column still with a carter head for Gin and has 20 reflux plates. please contact me at patrick@ontherockscocktails.com for questions. Asking $35,000 obo
  6. Still Manufactures

    I build from the ground up just about anything custom. Tailored to exact customer specs. 515-559-4879 Joseph Dehner Give a looks see redbootstills.com
  7. I've read books and posts about whiskey distilling techniques and traditions. It seems that most distillers large and small prefer to do stripping runs followed by separate finishing runs. I suspect that production efficiency is one of the reasons for this: three or four fast stripping runs +1 finish run. The question that I have - is tradition and convenience/efficiency the only reason for multiple runs? I have read that the multiple run produces a "cleaner" flavor, but it really should not be any cleaner than a single pass through a short column still with 1 to 3 plates. Will the character of the finished spirit be different?
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