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Found 22 results

  1. Quick little game of what the hell is that? The orange stuff is something new to me. This is a new equipment "sacrificial" mash with mostly corn. Smells like a normal bourbon mash. It is extremely oily. Corn oil? Otherwise, maybe some fluid leaked into the mash from the gear box on the agitator? All thoughts welcome. I did not taste it. Distilling now and I will see how the low wines taste.
  2. Everything was going normal as in the past two years of making rum and then BAM! Two days ago I noticed a couple of small dime size spots and today there is a full blown something going on??? Any ideas? Ty Dave
  3. Good evening ADI Community! I wanted to pick some of your brains to see who has researched, tested, used, or is currently using a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) or even Simultaneous Saccharification and Co-Fermentation (SSCF) based method in their process. If you're unfamiliar, that's okay, because I don't think this is a widely used concept within the craft distillery industry. However, this is a widely-used process within the ethanol industry and seems to not only speed up your processing time, but potentially even increase your ethanol yield. For us distillers, this would basically mean incorporating our glucoamylase and yeast in series where they would basically run in parallel. Potential drawbacks? It seems one would have to have a GA and Yeast product that is tolerable of the temperature and pH requirements. With a little research this should be feasible for most spirits/mash bills (at least ours - I can't say I've looked into all the other cases). Potential Advantages? Higher ethanol yield, reduced processing/fermentation time. Want to do some Googling? Might want to start off with this free scholarly article - while a bit technical read to some, it has some great data and cool graphs for us visual nerds.
  4. Hi All, I'm curious to know what people are doing for controlling their fermentation temperature. I've been looking at the different options available while shopping for my fermenters. Do you use tanks with dimpled or channeled jackets already built into them? Do you wrap a tank blanket around them and use that? (here's a link to one particular site that I've been looking at for this option http://www.powerblanket.com/fermentation-cooling) Do you have glycol in your jacket or cooling water? In my view glycol would be concerning because of the possibility of a leak. Or maybe you don't do any temperature control at all and let the variability add another element to your product? I've obviously geared this towards cooling the fermenters as they will warm as fermentation proceeds, but perhaps some of you heat your fermenters instead of cooling. Interested in hearing what everyone thinks and how they handle temperature control during fermentation. Thanks!
  5. Hi All I expect to share and learn from you, so we all can improve our knowledge and technical service worldwide. Enzymes are my world since 1998, with Novozymes brand. Have great successes! Paulo Braga
  6. I'm running into a lot of difficulty recently with my distillation/ fermentation. The symptoms are early onset of feints/ tails. I have tried increasing reflux in the still to continue the hearts cut but it isn't working. I have tried less reflux too. Fermentation appears to be good. Grain bill - 100% barley malt Starting gravity 1.061 Final gravity 0.997. Estimated ABV 8.38%. Final PH 4.19 Distillation Still - 250 litre pot with 3 plated column with dephlegmator. Heads and foreshots are compressed at the begining of the run - 100% reflux for 30 minutes and heads collected slowly afterwards. Cut is determined by taste a smell. Hearts- relfux is reduced and heating of pot is increased. Cut is determined by taste and smell. The average abv i was collecting before this was 81% ABV. I can achieve above 81% ABV initially but the abv drops fairly suddenly when about 25% of the expected hearts cut is obtained. The product becomes feinty after this point. I have checked the still for leaks but all the gaskets look fine. Any advice?
  7. Very Weird... Had 2 bourbon batches done simultaneously, SG 1.075 FG 1.01, same as before. Ran through the column still, usually we get 10-12 gallons of hearts at 80%, this run we ran heads, and it essentially dropped straight to 40% abv, and ran out 10-15 gallons of 40%!!! Usually without any cold water into the dephlemgator we keep the run between 70-80%, but even with cold water we couldn't even fill our plates....never seen this happen before any thoughts???? If the alcohol is present we hypothetically should be able to run a higher abv, just slower?!?!?!? BTW, 2 changes we made this run 1) Previously we haven't tested PH, (to clarify, we figured our our formula for the correct PH - 25g of Citric acid into 100 gallons of water - we stopped testing, but decided we should perfect our PH reading due to water fluctuation) so this time we were very careful to get PH to 5.75, where in the past we'd add our 25g and keep on mashing... 2) After fermentation, we let it sit for 2 days, as we couldn't run the still... Could either of these things cause our problem? Thanks everybody,
  8. So I would love to make an agricole style rhum, but know that cane juice is basically only stable for a few hours, with all the agricole producers essentially situated on cane plantations. That being said I feel like I have heard of frozen cane juice, and was wondering if anyone knew if it was viable to get a shipment of cane juice essentially flash frozen at the source, which could then be quickly melted down and pitched for a fermentation? On a similar vein, is it possible to get a shipment of cane itself and press it in house for the juice? (Though that sounds like more trouble then it's worth)
  9. 2 copper pots of 2000 liters each (antiques and artisanal copper vessels) Ideal for infusions & maceration of gin botanicals - Heating method: steam - Artisanal fabrication with copper (thickness 8 mm) - Origin: Argentina - Price: usd 20.000 dollaras - FOB Mendoza/Argentina
  10. 2 copper pots of 2000 liters each (antiques and artisanal copper vessels) Ideal for infusions & maceration of gin botanicals - Heating method: steam - Artisanal fabrication with copper (thickness 8 mm) - Origin: Argentina - Price: usd 20.000 dollaras - FOB Mendoza/Argentina
  11. Good Morning, We have a Grain Cooker that we bought and used 2 times for a special recipe that didnt work out so we are trying to get rid of it. We paid $15,000 for it but would like to at least get $12,500 out of it. It is 325 gallons, powered with electric units. Has a grate to keep grain from settling on bottom. Outlet above grate is 2 inch and below grate is 3 inch. Stainless still built with cypress wood on outside, which could be removed if needed. Has a thermometer, we have a mixer for it that we bought separate but would give with it to get rid of it. I tried attaching some pictures here but the file size was too large. If you would like to contact me about the cooker, my email is kbcdistillingcompany@gmail.com and I can give you more information and pictures.
  12. Our next door neighbors, No-Li Brewhouse (Spokane, WA) are selling 5 fermentation vessels. They have been employed as primary fermentation vessels (beer) for two years. Two will be available late-April, two more will be available mid-to late-summer. The last vessel will be available in the fall. We are replacing the vessels with cylindro-conical fermenters. They are asking $12,000 each. Features: fabricated by Malrex (2009, UK, http://www.malrexfabrication.co.uk/) 304 stainless steel 1000 gallon total capacity standpipe and drain ports and valves (2" TC) atmospheric, closed-top with manway on top insulated and jacketed – one rectangular glycol zone CIP arm w/ 1.5” TC fitting and sprayball 25 degree conical bottom (similar to dish bottom) 9' 2” tall; 5' 9” wide stainless outer shell vacuum and pressure relief valve Will send pics. Please contact Damon Scott at damon.nolibrewhouse@gmail.com
  13. Has anyone used this?: https://www.misco.com/beer-refractometer/beer-refractometer/beer-refractometer-wort-dissolved-solids-specific-gravity#detailed_description-tab I would love to have a reliable, quick way to determine dissolved solids in my wort so I can have a better handle on fermentation performance, if only approximate. If anyone has an opinion on this little guy, I'd love to hear it before I fork over 450 bucks for the luxury of knowing TDS in my wort. Getting away from hydrometry for tracking fermentation progress would be nice, as would being able to use sterile disposable pipettes to take a sample instead of less sanitary methods. I guess my biggest worry has to do with how long this thing will last... 1 year warranty for an item like this makes me want to see a review or two.... Thanks!
  14. Hey Folks, My partner and I are working on our business plan and one point is creating some challenges for us. Not having a background in fermentation or distilling, I was hoping someone or some people on here could point me in the direction of some information on how to work out yields - specifically for molasses-based rums - for fermentation and subsequent distillation. I imagine the variables are sugar concentration of the wash, the type of yeast, time, and temperature (and possibly others), but I'm not familiar with the basic formulas to estimate ABV of a wash post fermentation. Could anyone recommend some resources or offer advice? Thanks for your help.
  15. Not that I know which pump you are using, but most of the Liverani seem to be impeller type.
  16. 15 years wine industry sales, marketing and promotion Napa Valley College: fermentation, grain, fruit, grapes ACDI 1 week course, Holstein 3 day course From raw materials to packaging to placement. Nor-Cal, Napa Area Send me a PM to get started.
  17. Any one use or are familiar with this company? http://bio-process.com/industries/beverage-alcohol/ It looks like they cut their teeth on the ethanol market but have since branched into beverage alcohol. -Dave
  18. Just curious if anyone knows if the volume of heads in a given single batch run grows or is in any way related to the efficiency that is achieved in fermentation? Cheer, ryan
  19. So I just got the new municipal water report. What are the acceptable levels of chlorine and iron so as not to inhibit fermentation? The report lists a range of chlorine levels detected between 0.28 -0.77 with an MRDLG = 4 Iron was listed as .07 with an MCLG of N/A and MCL at 1.0 Not a chemist, but learning fast. Any input would be appreciated.
  20. I'd love to hear from anyone with experience adding enzymes to fruit mashes--whether the experience was positive or not.
  21. Hello my name is Anthony, I am apprentice/assistant distiller at Ascendant Spirits in Buellton, California. I am new to distilling, but my path here has been quite interesting. I studied Biomedical Engineering at Cal Poly and got my degree with a focus in microbiology, biologic systems, and industrial applications. Got an internship at a biotech company dealing with yeasts and fermentation making biofuels and other chemicals. After my internship they said I got a job, but through some bureaucracy (which I'm sure you're all very familiar with), they didn't have a position for me, and I didn't get a job. I continued looking in the brewing industry with my new fascination with yeast and fermentation, but I came too late, the market is saturated. Dabbled in the wine industry but it's too slow paced for me. Through a fun turn of events I got connected with Stephen Gertman who was going to start a new distillery, and he needed someone with a strong background in science and engineering, and understood the principals of fermentation. Few months later it's a reality, Stephen just got word yesterday that we are legal to make distilled beverages in the eyes of the feds and state. And although I am new to artisan distilling, I am very much eager to learn as much as I can. Thank you for providing this space for distillers and enthusiasts alike to come together and collaborate each other's knowledge and ideas. -Anthony Cano
  22. Hello my name is Anthony, I am apprentice/assistant distiller at Ascendant Spirits in Buellton, California. I am new to distilling, but my path here has been quite interesting. I studied Biomedical Engineering at Cal Poly and got my degree with a focus in microbiology, biologic systems, and industrial applications. Got an internship at a biotech company dealing with yeasts and fermentation making biofuels and other chemicals. After my internship they said I got a job, but though some bureaucracy (which I'm sure you're all very familiar with), they didn't have a position for me, and I didn't get a job. I continued looking in the brewing industry with my new fascination with yeast and fermentation, but I came too late, the market is saturated. Dabbled in the wine industry but it's too slow paced for me. Through a fun turn of events I got connected with Stephen Gertman who was going to start a new distillery, and he needed someone with a strong background in science and engineering, and understood the principals of fermentation. Few months later it's a reality, Stephen just got word yesterday that we are legal to make distilled spirits in the eyes of the feds and state. And although I am new to artisan distilling, I am very much eager to learn as much as I can. Thank you for providing this space for distillers and enthusiasts alike to come together and collaborate each other's knowledge and ideas. -Anthony Cano