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Found 14 results

  1. I am looking for a better way to adjust proof in liqueurs. By better, I mean better than add water, re-distill sample for obscuration, repeat, etc. I'm not that smart, so an example would be great. We proof our basic spirits with hydrometers, by weight, Can someone walk me through the correct way to take a small sample and figure out how much water to add to bring it down to a specific proof? I understand that we would still need to re-distill the end product to ensure it is, indeed, the correct proof. Thanks, Todd
  2. gauging

    I can't seem to get a clear answer from this one, excuse my ignorance on the subject. When creating a certain liqueur with my former employer, we treated sugars(maple syrup) and other additives(coffee and coffee extract) as water when proofing. I figured the relatively high density of these liquids may skew the results. They were off a bit from treating them like water and we found ourselves correcting with water when we got the results back from the lab with the seamless glass still that gave us a precise ABV. This was an enormous pain in the ass and we found ourselves going back to the lab the better part of ten times before we achieved the desired proof. TL,DR: What is the best solution to properly proofing liqueurs and spirits with added sugar? Thanks! Minogue
  3. I am developing a computer program for blending of liqueurs containing sugars. I do not run a distillery myself, but I understand one possibility that I should cater for as an ingredient in liqueur production is an infusion made by soaking fruit in rectified spirit. What proof range is used for the rectified spirit? An internet search found only DIY instruction for people who buy a bottle of vodka and make their own infusion at home. I have struggled to find information on how this is done on a commercial scale. Apart from the starting proof of the spirit, I am also interested in knowing how much water and sugar are extracted from the fruit together with the flavors. I don't want to steal anybody's detailed recipes - I only need to know the strength range the program must cover. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
  4. One of my products is a software package for doing proofing calculations when blending, diluting or fortifying spirits. Over the years a few customers have asked me whether the software could be used for calculating blends involving liqueurs which include syrup or granular sugar. Unfortunately my software cannot cope with anything beyond pure alcohol-water mixtures. Whenever I have followed up on these requests I have found the producers of the liqueurs were very reluctant to explain their calculation needs in any detail. The email exchanges always died out quickly and I concluded that these recipes were closely guarded secrets. I have had two more of these requests, followed by the usual silences, in the last few weeks and it got me wondering whether it would be worth investing in getting the necessary data and developing a blending calculator that could include the effect of sugar. If any of you have experience of how the blending calculations are currently done for liqueurs I would be very grateful for your comments. I am absolutely not interested in getting at anybody's recipes (I don't run a distillery) and I am only interested in the general procedures used for doing the blending calculations. From what I understand, it is necessary to do a lab distillation after every blending operation to determine the proof. If the proofing calculations are being done as simple proportions (as in the Pearson Square method) and neglecting the shrinkage this could be a slow and laborious process of creeping up on the target proof. I supposer at the top end of the market the blenders are using fixed recipes that have been refined by trial and error over decades, and at the bottom end of the market accuracy may not be important. If you are able to comment on this process, without giving away your trade secrets, please help me to see if there is a problem I can help solve. I don't want to put a whole lot of work into developing a solution to a problem that does not exist. Thanks in advance for your comments.
  5. This July I will have approximately 300 PG of blueberry distillate available for sale. As long as I know in advance, I can distill to whatever proof you desire, anywhere from 80-190+ proof. $25 per proof gallon, First come, first serve. FOB Columbia, Illinois 62236. Thanks, Adam
  6. My name is Mike, and I've taken the plunge in the craft distillers arena. I've spent the better of the past 2 years getting Belizean Rumpopo approved by TTB, ABC, etc... I have a DSP license,and ABC type 07 license. I do not distill, I import my rum from Florida. Rumpopo is a rum and cream base liqueur that is a favorite belizean adult beverage. You can find a ton of recipes online, but I assure you that none compares to my father's recipe, especially when it comes down to shelf life emulsion, texture, most important taste. My product is in 3 retail location in the bay area and I'm working to increase that number. This has been a heck of a journey so far and an incredible learning opportunity.
  7. My name is Mike, and I've taken the plunge in the craft distillers arena. I've spent the better of the past 2 years getting Belizean Rumpopo approved by TTB, ABC, etc... I have a DSP license,and ABC type 07 license. I do not distill, I import my rum from Florida. Rumpopo is a rum and cream base liqueur that is a favorite belizean adult beverage. You can find a ton of recipes online, but I assure you that none compares to my father's recipe, especially when it comes down to shelf life emulsion, texture, most important taste. My product is in 3 retail location in the bay area and I'm working to increase that number. This has been a heck of a journey so far and an incredible learning opportunity.
  8. Hi everyone ! I'm looking for some professionnal advice on proofing liqueurs. We have a couple of interesting ideas but we lack some knowledge about proofing sweet spirits. I read other posts but to be honest I don't feel I know everything I should to commercialize a liqueur right now. We need to be pretty accurate when it come to alc. % etc. .. I'm in Eastern Canada so I would be please if someone in the Northeast would accept to receive me at their distillery to exchange on our practices and ideas ! Thanks guys Jean-Philippe
  9. We're shooting for 4g sugar per oz of product. Anything I should know about sweetening agents? Our initial recipe calls for apple juice, white sugar, and molasses. The sweetness seems about right in terms of sugar, but just not incorporated into the spirit so much as some liqueurs (maybe this just develops in the bottle?). The mouthfeel might be a little thin.
  10. Skip Rock Distillers in Snohomish, WA (North of Seattle) is looking for a distillery production intern. We are a family owned craft distillery that takes a farm to bottle approach on everything we do. That means sourcing rye, potatoes, berries, apples and walnuts from local farmers. We then take those raw materials and mash, ferment, distill, and age all of our products at our distillery in the heart of Snohomish's Downtown Historic District. The intern will work closely with the Skip Rock team to learn the following skills: Distillation of Spirits Management of Different Mashes and Fermentations Product Development Barreling and Aging Labeling and Bottling Warehousing of Spirits and Supplies Sanitation and Cleaning Product testing and evaluation Potential to explore a specific spirits production topic We produce potato vodka, grain vodka, rye whiskey, bourbon, various fruit and nut liqueurs, rum and gin. We have won numerous awards and have been in business since 2009. We use a Kothe still and have a pilot system for yeast trials, recipe development and other needs. Requirements: Be at least 21 years of age Interest in learning and building experience in small distillery operations Be on time and ready to learn Be able to lift at least 50 pounds Must be able to lift, stoop, kneel, climb and walk without issue; must be able to stand for extended periods of time Must have reliable transportation Must possess current, personal health insurance Prior knowledge of the brewing and distillation process is appreciated but not required Must not have a prior felony conviction or charge; be ready for a background check Additional requirements may arise at any time Technically, this is a “trainee” position where you will be able to learn a great deal about distilling and the craft spirits industry. Students at a university/college program might be able to obtain credit for this internship and we will work with you to help with that. The intern would be expected to be at the distillery 25-40 hours/week depending on schedules. We are typically in production Monday - Saturday, 9:00-5:00pm. This internship is open to start immediately and run for three months in duration. Upon successful completion a stipend will be awarded depending on hours completed. Email us for additional information or to send in a cover letter and resume. Skip Rock Distillers, 104 Ave C, Snohomish, WA 98290. info@skiprockdistillers.com Cheers!
  11. After digging into many posts related to start ups, production, volume, sales, etc., I cannot locate any data - anecdotal OK - related to the amount of production / distribution (whether self or through distributor) / tasting room sales, etc. that a start up distillery had in Y1 and a comparison of same to Y2 or Y3. I'm not talking revenue - just cases (or bottles/barrels put up if applicable). I'm close to receiving approval on a loan for a small downtown (town=6000 people) Main Street location distillery and tasting room in (touristy) CO. I plan to produce vodka and two liqueurs and have estimated production at 800 cases of vodka per year (12-750ml) and 600 cases of liqueur (calculated on 12-750ml). My biz plan assumes 50 cases of each sold from the tasting room and the remainder sold thru distribution networks (including utilizing strong regional contacts in the restaurant/bar/retail/hotel industries). I also have a network of contacts in key cities in the US but am still trying to understand how I will utilize them in connection with a distributor or broker. Would anyone be willing to comment on their own personal experience from start up thru Y1 or Y2 or Y3 related to what was produced / distributed / sold and how. Alternatively, if there is data of this nature available "to the public", I would relay the location to my banker, who is having difficulty locating statistics of this nature. I know I've got a long way to go, and much to figure out but no need to continue if the bank says "no". Thanks for any input/direction to keep looking - as simple as Case #s produced/distributed. CB
  12. Alright guys I have been exposed to some magical chocolate liqueur recently and I was curious if anyone has some insight on how to infuse vodka with chocolate and then distill it (I believe the distillery claimed that it was not from an essence or flavoring added into vodka but rather chocolate infused and then distilled). Here are some things to feed off what would give a get a nice aroma and flavor i.e. types of chocolate, % of cocoa, baking chocolate etc. So if anyone has some ideas or places to go with this please feel free to post them! Thanks everyone!
  13. After digging into many posts related to start ups, production, volume, sales, etc., I cannot locate any data - anecdotal OK - related to the amount of production / distribution (whether self or through distributor) / tasting room sales, etc. that a start up distillery had in Y1 and a comparison of same to Y2 or Y3. I'm not talking revenue - just cases (or bottles/barrels put up if applicable). I'm close to receiving approval on a loan for a small downtown (town=6000 people) Main Street location distillery and tasting room in (touristy) CO. I plan to produce vodka and two liqueurs and have estimated production at 800 cases of vodka per year (12-750ml) and 600 cases of liqueur (calculated on 12-750ml). My biz plan assumes 50 cases of each sold from the tasting room and the remainder sold thru distribution networks (including utilizing strong regional contacts in the restaurant/bar/retail/hotel industries). I also have a network of contacts in key cities in the US but am still trying to understand how I will utilize them in connection with a distributor or broker. Would anyone be willing to comment on their own personal experience from start up thru Y1 or Y2 or Y3 related to what was produced / distributed / sold and how. Alternatively, if there is data of this nature available "to the public", I would relay the location to my banker, who is having difficulty locating statistics of this nature. I know I've got a long way to go, and much to figure out but no need to continue if the bank says "no". Thanks for any input/direction to keep looking - as simple as Case #s produced/distributed. CB
  14. I like making my own vodkas, infusions and liqueurs. I have nothing against drinking 190 proof Spirytus or Everclear either. It is a shame that this good stuff is not easy to get nowadays. People in Europe add it to fruits, teas and juices. I am a hobbyist but no stranger to distilling. However, making fruit vodkas, liqueurs and cremes interests me most.