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Odin

33 questions on taste rich distilling

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Odin    45

Hi there,

Here's a little booklet I wrote a few months ago on taste rich distilling. With a few typo's. Sorry for that. Not of native English tongue. Let me know what you think of it and if I should write a few more. Like on gin making, whiskey making, still design and operation, or whatever. As long as you can think of a few questions, me and my team can probably dive in.

Regards, Odin.

33 Questions On Taste Rich Distilling.pdf

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Foreshot    13

Thanks Odin. I really like the part on ester formation and the exploration of the Maillard reaction. You're contributing a lot to knowledge of distillers everywhere. 

 

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PeteB    45

That was a really good read Odin. Much of what you have said there is how I run my distillery.

A couple of chemistry technical points. You said "Ethyl acetate may not ring a bell with you. But it’s vinegar alcohol"

Vinegar is acetic acid, not alcohol. But when vinegar reacts with ethanol it produces an ester called Ethyl acetate. That is not alcohol either, it is an organic salt.

The other chemical mistake was calling copper a catalyst. A catalyst helps a chemical reaction take place but is not consumed. It is like a worker in a factory, workers are not normally consumed to make the products. Copper in a still is slowly consumed as you say, so by definition it is not a catalyst.

Please write some more, you seem to be able to explain things very clearly despite English not being your first language.

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Odin    45

Thanks Pete! For the feedback and the kudo's. I'll make some more books. On gin and on rum and on still design. I'll try to do one every quarter. Next one to be released by February.

Hi Tom, hmmm ... to clarify: if you consume workers during the distillation process, please make sure you cut out their heads and tails!

;)

Regards, Odin.

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oddcobb    0
Vinegar is acetic acid, not alcohol. But when vinegar reacts with ethanol it produces an ester called Ethyl acetate. That is not alcohol either, it is an organic salt 

Pete, Just a quick pedantic point. Ethyl acetate is not a salt either. Generally speaking Organic salts have VERY high vapor pressures and consequently boiling points. Ethyl Acetate is just a small ester compound. It's also quite volatile (its boiling temp is ~ 171 F). It can be produced by the interaction of acetic acid and alcohol, but it can also be produced by yeast as a metabolic byproduct

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PeteB    45

Thanks oddcobb.

It is just over 44 years since I sat my last organic chemistry exam at the University of Tasmania. I have obviously forgotten most of it but it is surprising how much comes back with the right prompt.

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MDH    4

Just a bit of pedantic nitpicking.

The dead yeast itself doesn't create off flavors. Autolysis byproducts include fatty acids that are important precursors to the aromatic profile of long-aged spirits. It also provides micronutrients to lactobacilli, which are important to the profile of many whiskies. If dead yeast were itself the cause of off flavors, distillers would be found using high flocculating yeasts and clearing their mashes completely, since all yeast are killed during the distillation process.

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