cestrin

How To Proof Rum With Brown sugar Added

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How do you take into account sugar added to rum into the final proof? We barrel-finished our rum and are trying to get it to 80 proof and know that sugar will decrease the perceived proof of the rum.

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I understand. In order to get an accurate proof, it has to be distilled to measure the amount of alcohol in the product. If you do not have a lab grade distillation apparatus, you will need to send it to a lab like Enartis Vinquiry for analysis.

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It all depends on how much sugar you add. As I read it there are three conditions, one ignore the sugar if it's low enough, less than 400mg/100ml, two If solids are between 400-600mg/100ml and proof is between 80-100 you have three choices per cfr30.32, three if over 600mg/100ml then you have to redistill. 

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If you know the proof and weight (or volume) of the rum and the target sugar loading then you can calculate the quantities of sugar and dilution water required to achieve 80 proof using the calculator downloadable from www.katmarsoftware.com/alcodenslq.htm 

But the final proof must be verified as described by bluefish_dist

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16 hours ago, glisade said:

Part 3 here: https://www.ttb.gov/spirits/proofing.shtml

It's not that hard and you can buy a nice little glass lab still for a few hundred $.

 

Be careful of cheaper condensers on the glass lab stills.

I originally had a graham condenser, it has spiral path that when on an angle has liquid at the bottom of the spirals that prevents vapor escaping without condensing. It got broken and was replaced with a straight through Liebig condenser. I don't think this is condensing all the vapor as I am getting lower than expected readings.

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Yeah that's the problem with Graham condensers.  The typical glass fittings that come with distillation glassware don't allow them to be kept vertical.  Usually end up needing additional glass as well as an extra stand.

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I don't think I explained myself properly. I don't like the straight through Liebig condensers especially if they are short. Some uncondensed vapor can get through without being condensed especially if heat turned up too much at start of boil. Whereas the Graham condenser with the spiral vapor path is much longer and also if it is at about an angle of 45 deg. some liquid forms at the bottom of the curves and prevents any loss of vapor.

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