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Mash    7

Miss Dana, a custom made and Artisan Still Designed, whisky making machine. She's been featured on the Discovery Channel, Smithsonian Channel, (United States of Drinking) and many documentaries. This still is for the passionate, the one that cares about flavor, tradition and craftsmanship.  There is something special about this still and the whisky that she can make.

200 gal , 3-3" tri clamp fittings for eclectric

14" manway with sight glass, 3" tri clamp fitting on top, 7mm stainless bottom and 3 mm sides. CIP

4" side drain, 4" butterfly valve., CIP valve. 5 foot in dia, Dephlegmator, Parrot, 6 fo by 18" SS shot gun condenser. With SS tube base, (pic). Has a 400k BTU burner and electric elements, single or three phase. 

Lowered price $22,900. Steam generator included!!!

Steam generator, I paid $3800 and has never been used, is now included.

 

Steam Injector $3500 Sight glass, electric and gas, pressure reliefs, built by Affordable Distillery equipment (New, Never Used) 

MIss Dana 2.JPG

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Mash    7

Price lowered- $31,500.

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Mash    7

Price lowered to $29,900. For ADI followers.

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Mash    7

Lowered to $26,900

Steam generator included.

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Mash    7

Lowered Price another 2 grand, and the steam generator is included for on the grain distilling.

The steam generator has an 8" exhaust, it is burner fired and electricity. The elements are single phase, sight glass, valves, safeties are all included. It creates steam and injects it directly into the mash. Was designed and built by Affordable Distillery Equipment. No need for condensate return, pumps and other equipment. Simple, efficient, and easy to use. I don't have any cut drawing but Paul at Affordable Distillery does. 

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Georgeous

 

This steam injector vessel is very simple.  It is a stainless steel barrel with electric heating elements in it.It has vacuum relief and pressure relief valves.  It is an open system but it does operate at up to 3 psi.  The level of liquid in the distilling vessel above the steam injection line dictates the pressure of the steam.  The taller the water column created by the level of mash in the still,the greater the  pressure.  So this steam injector is not a true steam boiler,because it is an open system.  In my opinion direct steam injection is the best way to cook corn mash.  It works great for distilling as well, however you must have an extra 20% of head space in your still, aside from the 15% head space that you should normally have in the still.  On the way up to operating temp,the injected steam will condense which will increase the liquid level in the still, but once the operating temp is reached the liquid level in the still will decrease as the ethanol is boiled off.  These units are very efficient but they have slow heat up times and you  are not going to be able to use the full distilling capacity of the still.  I sold these steam injectors with 4 or 5 of my stills and a bunch of mash tuns.  The gas fired injectors that we built towards the end had much faster heat up times because I designed them with heat exchangers that had  as much as 60 sqft of heat exchange surface area inside them.  I stopped building them when we started our standard series line of Baine Marie stills because I could sell the jacketed baine marie stills and or mash tuns with their own built in heating  systems for less than what I had to sell single walled direct injected mash tuns or stills with the steam injector for.  The Belle of Dayton Distillery has been running one of our 300 gallon combo mash tun stills from one of our steam injection vessels for 5 or more years now with very good results.

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The other thing that you should know is that when using the steam injection vessel there will be a banging noise in the still until operating temp is reached.  The banging will be loud at first but as the temp of the steam and mash get closer together the banging gets quieter.  The banging is from a pressure wave that is created by the difference in temp of  the steam and the mash.   You can buy certain steam spargers that do not create the pressure waves.

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Kara 1836    0

so, if i'm reading this right, you reduce the charge/mash volume another 20% off 170 gallon -ish?is the true amount you can put in still closer to 140 gal?

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Mash    7

It is designed to use about 15 gallons of water converted to steam. Remember you will be removing condensate and water as part of the process. So, at a 10% abv, and the proof that you pull off during the distillation process you will effectively trade steam condensate for spirits at "X" proof. The point is, make great whiskey, and don't get mired in all minutia. I have had some really bad whiskey produced by hi-tech, expensive stills.  Making whiskey is both an art and science.  

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