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Coriolis

Schizosaccharomyces pombe

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Coriolis    1

Anyone had any experience using Schizosaccharomyces pombe? Anyone know where to source it?

 

I'm curious to try a few experiments!

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Coriolis    1
11 hours ago, Silk City Distillers said:

Very difficult to source.

And from what I can see, not many strains dedicated to distillers fermentation needs. Might have to go in the "too hard" basket for the meantime unless anyone on here has any better ideas!

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Coriolis    1
On 7/3/2017 at 10:38 PM, Silk City Distillers said:

Very difficult to source.

Thanks for the info fellas. Interesting stuff. I'm not quite sure I'm at a stage where i can get into this as a project just yet but it's definitely on the 'must try" list.

To my mind, one of the big problems is just like S.Cerivisiae different strains have different characteristics and are suitable for different types of fermentation. With little to no public information (that I can find) on strains used in Rum ferments I'd imagine I'd have to take developing a decent performing strain on myself - that's definitely outside of my pay grade!!

 

Edited by Coriolis
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Ironton    1

May I ask why you are so interested in schizosaccharomyces pombe?

Correct me if I am wrong, but the only good that will come from this yeast in Rum production is the "rum oil" that they produce so easy. Rum Oil can also be created with budding yeast, yet it takes more effort. The solution for this is called Dunder, which is the same as Sour Mash in Whiskey. If you use 20-35% of Dunder in your new wash it will give the nutrients from dead yeast cells what they need to create the Rum Oil that is desired in a tradition Jamaican Rum. If you go this route (which I have decided to go) make sure you take care of your process as Dunder can also create some off flavors if not controlled properly.

There is a reason why most fermentation projects have given up on tradional fermentations with wild yeast trains. It is much harder to control and requires a lot of time and effort to get going. With the advancement of S.Cerivisiae we can have much more control of our fermentaions and if need be, use nutrients for increased breakdown (ie amylo, hitempase, bioglucanase) and controlled wild yeast (ie lacto, pedio, brett and wine yeast) for finished flavors. IMO it is better to spend more time developing a S.Cervisiae yeast that produces the flavor you are looking for. I personally like belgian strains.

And since I don't like to see people give up so easy....

If you would like to continue your experiment, find a kombucha that you particularly like, then go to the source and ask for a sample of their mother (or take some from an unpasturized bottle). With any luck you will be able to find and isolate some schizosaccharomyces pombe form the mother. There has been some research that show hi traces of schizosaccharomyces pombe in kombucha and may be one of the key fermenting yeast in the mother. This option is free if you have the proper equipment.

And if you don't have the proper equipment and don't want to spend the $400 per strain to find the right one for you and then put this strain through the wringer to make it stronger, team up with a local University. This method allows you to use someone else's time and money to do the research for you. This is exactly why I have jumped to the distilling industry from beer. There are a lot of unknows and the research to find out why is part of the fun. I am currently teaming up with a local University to learn more about the role that Koji plays in saccharification of rice. I want to try to replicate the qualities that Koji gives to Sochu without the need of extra equipment and time. 

Hope this helps!

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Coriolis    1

@Ironton thanks for your thoughts.

At this stage its more of a professional curiosity than a serious endeavor. To my mind, it's one of the great things about the relatively unregulated world of Rum - so many avenues to explore. One of the reasons I was asking is that Arroyo specifically mentions it in his texts as being preferable to S.Cervisiae and I thought it strange that it wasn't in wider use if someone as respected as Arroyo believed in it. From my limited research, it would seem that it has similar alcohol yield properties but greater   Maybe as you say, it's purely a function of the improvement in the S.Cervisiae strains available to us today.

With respect to the point on Dunder - I do use it but not sure whether it has significant affect on the production of the rum oils we're all so  keen on. Now, if your talking about using dunder in a proper muck pit....that's a whole other discussion!

 

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