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Newbie about liquors and liqeuers


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#1 slayermk_I

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:52 AM

Hi, me and my partner are new in this business of liquors and liqeuers and have been experimenting with natural botanicals and grains infused in a base product (no preservants added). We actually have 5 formulas using GNS, bourbon and corn whiskey bases. At first all of the formulas worked fine but as time passed by scent and flavor faded away a couple of months later. Is it because we are using natural ingredients? A lack of preservants? What kind of chemical reaction are we having? They are stored in transparent bottles in a dark place.

How can these be stabilized so it can be sold to the public?
Thanks for your feedback!

#2 FrEwing

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 05:20 PM

It's the formula. Fruit/Botanicals concentration and quantity is essential to flavor extraction and aroma. The Rule is: try and then try again and then try again. I've been at it for over 30 years and it always comes back to that same rule.
Best of luck.

#3 pressure9pa

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 06:45 PM

What proof(s) are these items?

#4 slayermk_I

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 11:30 AM

Nothing new FreWing huh? Tell me something we don´t know. We are using 80º proof corn whiskey by the way.

The thing is that when new you opened the bottle and the whole room smelled like someone broke a perfume bottle in there and tasted like what they used to serve in the Olimpus. But a couple of months later it only seems like a normal corn whiskey with few extra taste and aroma. Is this normal in this type of product or are we actually having something wrong going on?

#5 coop

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 03:50 PM

You need to tell us what your mixture of grains for your corn whiskey, and the process you are useing to make it?? Coop

#6 will

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:27 PM

E300 - Ascorbic acid is the most commonly used color retention agent.

#7 Jedd Haas

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:00 PM

According to Wikipedia, "Ascorbic acid is a naturally occurring organic compound with antioxidant properties." Does that mean that no label disclosure is required? I'm sure it's GRAS, but the Beverage Alcohol Manual is silent on ascorbic acid.

FDA says:
  • Ascorbic acid - PRES, GRAS, GMP - 182.3013; DS, GRAS, GMP - 182.5013; NUTR, GRAS, GMP - 182.8013; MISC, GRAS/FS, Part 137, Cereal Flours; 150.141, 150.161, Art Sw Jellies & Preserves; 155.200 - Canned Mushrooms & Artichokes
source: http://www.fda.gov/F...s/ucm091048.htm

#8 slayermk_I

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 09:49 AM

E300? Hmmm that could do it... I also read that some industries use E224 to stabilize things (wines and some liqueurs) any thoughts on that?

Thanks for your comments!




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