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  1. The VFD is apparently single phase and converts to 3 phase for the motor. Perfectly normal.
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  2. NOBODY!!! The huge Scottish Malt Whisky industry filters out the grain
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  3. You sound extremely full of yourself.
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  4. Even though we started small, it was still very expensive. We had to re-zone the land, build the building, equip it and ultimately, figure out how to actually make a product somebody would want to buy. In the end, it cost us about $700,000 to open the doors. Our rule was, if we couldn't write a check, we couldn't buy it. So, when we opened our doors, we had no debt or significant overhead. So, it was easy to re direct our early earnings to quickly upgrading our equipment and most importantly, winning our backyard. Both of those turned out to be good choices because when the covid thing hit, we
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  5. After 30 years as a pilot and 7 as a distiller I find the industries to be very much the same. To make a little bit of money in either industry, you start with a lot of money...
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  6. Price in the buck and offer it for the 60-90 days then make the buck yourself after the term.
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  7. We're pretty guarded about what our spirits actually cost to produce. This is because, they all wind up roughly costing the same - but, we sell them at a variety of prices. Including, some pretty high price points - those beverages are super profitable for us and yet some of them are very inexpensive to produce. So we like the mystique - and I think, so does the customer. It makes what we do seem out of reach and therefore, desirable.
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  8. I know virtually nothing about distribution of spirits. But I am a salesperson by trade and can say with conviction that you do not want your customer knowing your COGS under any circumstance. You lose a lot of leverage, ability to negotiate price, and gain little in return.
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  9. Interesting question. My question to you would be why? I work my suggested sell price backwards with 30 pts for the retailer and 30pts for the distributor. I then tell the distributor my sell price to them and my suggested retail. I let them decide how much they make and how much the retailer makes. This equation gives me my margin on every product the distributor sells. Personally, I don't want me distributor to know my COGS. I think it is a recipe for them to squeeze every possible penny out of you by giving you an explanation that retailers need more. Just my opinion.
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  10. I forgot about this thread. I did a little research but did not report back. It could be a low level of butyric acid. Stephen from BA had the same issue & he analyzed it as such. Most likely from an infection. Yeast can produce it too though I don't know the level/reasons. http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Butyric_Acid https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/j.2050-0416.1979.tb06846.x
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  11. Ester development in the fast ferment will not be as complex as the slow ferment. Every extra day of fermentation provides the opportunity for thousands of esters to trans esterify- which is a cascading reaction of newly produced carboxylic acids and alcohol molecules interacting with preexisting or newly formed carboxylic acid groups and alcohols. Often allowing a ferment to rest for a day post fermentation can increase ester complexity as well. Im not saying you aren't gonna pull this off and can't sell the bottle, im just saying it might not be the same profile 6-8 years down the line.
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  12. I don't know about varieties but I do know that they take around 7 years to produce their first crop of berries.
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  13. New price - $4,900
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  14. Appeals to tradition usually make me laugh. While I certainly enjoy studying traditional methods and means and even own a few great traditional tools across the various trades I’ve studied, they are almost always made better with application of new technology and knowledge. Sure, I might like a Brown Bess musket and respect her place in history and her capabilities but even in that same form factor I can now have better barrel steel, stronger lock and trigger, better more efficient projectiles, cleaner faster powders, better sighting systems, and stronger more durable stocks.
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  15. I have a dream that one day we can strike the word "infection" from the distilling vocabulary. We love mixed bacterial fermentation, and routinely use at least a half dozen strains of non-yeast microbes in fermentation. Even the brewing community has begun to embrace mixed-culture fermentation in a big way. Yesterday's infection is today's purposeful inoculation. Keep in mind that a whiskey wash that doesn't go through a boil post saccharification is going to be absolutely loaded with a plethora of non-yeast bacteria that will flourish during fermentation, especially protracted dur
    1 point
  16. The elements that contribute to the flavor and color of your product are typically in solution, and won't be removed with barrier filtration unless that filtration is very, very, very fine. Whiskey and spirits are very low-solids products. Most of my filter customers can go a long time on a single set of filters. Months or more depending on how they take care of them. All that being said, the difference between 1 micron and 1.2 microns is extremely minute for most spirits. I would be very surprised if changing from a filter size of 1.0 vs 1.2 microns had any perceptible effect whatsoever, eith
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  17. Some filter suppliers will offer to do bench runs of filter media for you to test to help you select your filtration. (Shout out to David Strauch at Strauch Chemical) Personally we go as coarse as we can without any visual issues. For most of our whiskeys that means just going through a 5 micron cartridge. For our brandies we do see some haze so we use Beco Select A20 pads and chill filtration (around 4 C) or a similar cartridge with non-chill filtration depending on the expression.
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  18. No offense, but: A) They already know, and B) They don't care. Prost
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  19. Every distributor is different but generally will do their best to get as low a price as possible. Most do not just take your price and then slap on a markup. They want to sell and low prices move products. Sharing your costs will get them to look at you as a cost plus vendor. That's not a good position for a premium product. If you're looking to be a lower cost producer then it's a good idea. For craft folk I would highly suggest Value pricing. Take a look at what other craft spirits are selling for in your area and price in that range. For distributors you will need to understand what your e
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  20. Whoever you’re buying your still from should be able to help you on that.
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  21. Slightly off topic, but I have done a few runs now of hammer milled grain-in malt whiskey, and I was very, very pleasantly surprised with the flavor of the distillate. Give it a go, you might like the result. I generally go out of my way to try to challenge the status quo. I continually hear that you can't make malt whiskey grain in. So I said, that sounds like the perfect thing to try out. Tannin astringency? Huh? We tried roller mill variants, that created real headache in pump overs from the tun to the fermenters, from the fermenters to the still, and on still cleanout. Roller mil
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  22. Looking for recommendations for still manufacturers/dealers for a 200 gallon combo pot still/vodka column ? thanks Kelly
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  23. we add it at the end and hold for 60 minutes at 150°F. we made several batches of rye now and from here on out all will be 100% unmalted Texas Rye. Thank you again.
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  24. This is what I mean by High and Hot. High percentage of rye cook it real hot. You can gelatinize rye at lower temps, but everything will gelatinize faster at higher temps. Our mashes are cooked to the upper threshold limit of high temp tolerant alpha amylase (189/190). Cosmic is right on with a Rye ferment, you can't get greedy on your grist ratio. If you need to dilute to the point of lower brix do it it is worth it. We've been cooking rye here for a long time and are just now getting to a 2.5 lb:1 gallon grist ratio. 10% can change a lot if that addition is malt and you
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  25. We have smoked all type of stuff raw and malted grains and botanicals. Depending on how much you want to do we do it on a Traeger grill! Could do it on any smoker, Just put trays on your smoker like its Mac and cheese!
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  26. 60 minutes in a rush, but holding at temp for 90 minutes give us yields that are a touch better (2-3%).
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  27. We cook at 90c - 100% unmalted - all exogenous enzyme conversion - Beta glucanase, High temp alpha amylase and Glucoamylase.
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  28. Same, we take 100% unmalted up to around 90c as well. We tried lower, but yields drop precipitously.
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  29. Unmalted. Yeah come on by, thankfully we are open.
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  30. I make a 100% Rye mash with no malt with decent yields. The trick is to add enough water so it doesn't get so thick. We bring the temp up to 90c and add high temp enzymes, which I understand is hotter than most people take it, but it works for us *shrug*
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  31. Definitely a lacto to me. When making beer Lacto is bad, when making whiskey Lacto is great. Some of the best whiskeys I have ever made and a good lacto on them. When I make moonshine or a charter whiskey, 80% corn and 20% wheat I wait for the wash to get a lacto and then run it.
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  32. @PeteB I think you mean Arrack - NOT - Arak. Arak is the world's oldest spirit. It originates from the Levant (i.e. Palestine, Jordan, Syria & Lebanon) and Iraq. It is a triple distilled (via pot still), grape brandy infused with aniseed, and usually aged for at least one year in clay amphorae. Arak is the grandfather of all spirits, as it was the first distilled spirit, because the Arabs of this region created the alembic pot still and successfully distilled wine in 900AD. Through trade, Arak quickly spread throughout the rest of the Mediterranean Basin, and these countries bega
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  33. Your mileage may vary, but I say let it ride. I posted this a few years back on another forum - there is no science behind this, just tasting a bunch of 10g and 15g barrels as they went through maturation. If you really need to be careful with this, go with @JustAndy 's approach, it will work. Don't forget about the small barrel maturation curve, it goes like this: 1. Young harsh distillate. 2. Tastes like whiskey. 3. OH MY GOD ITS OVER-OAKED. 4. Wow, that's really good, I now realize that # 2 tastes like crap. 5. Ah christ, now it's really over-oaked. 6
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  34. I use defoamer 880 which is available in the sizes I mentioned I prefer to add it to my fermenter post fermentation before I start drawing out of it to feed the column because I don't like its impact on fermentation, I leave enough head space where I don't care about a little (multiple feet) of foaming. Other operators in our facility would argue it doesn't matter and pitch it for fermentation. I am on an ester quest. Others are not. If you or anyone else reading this doesn't want to use antifoam thats fine if you have a pot still and you're mindful of your hot break, I
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  35. That's strange because I have purchased whiskey from venders in several different states and it all came Fed Ex. I think that you are right about UPS though. I don't think UPS does that but fed ex has been delivering whiskey to both my residential and business adresses with no issues for years. I have to purchase online a lot because I am in such a rural area the liquor stores don't carry a lot of what I want. The below is from uptown spirits. Also there are hundreds if not thousands of business selling spirits online. https://www.google.com/search?q=online+spirits&rlz=1C1ASUC_en
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  36. We have a really bad tendency to equate all spirit production as the same. So when we get into discussion like this we miss one point that we really need to say: Different flavor profiles are made with different tools and processes. We know this we just seem to ignore it for our own point of view on our on products. What's best for a lightly flavored Brandy is different than a heavy rum or whiskey or a neutral. Who's going to use a 40 plate stainless steel still to make a scotch style whiskey? Who's going to use a copper pot still to make a neutral? Can you do it? Yes - but it doesn't mean it
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  37. You'll won't laugh at my stupid examples above after I tell you that they are all real vodkas. I didn't even mention the low-carb vodka made for bodybuilders and health conscious people. WTF? Or the pH balanced Vodka, better for you since it's not acidic. Or the Alkaline Vodka, that's more alkaline than neutral, because somehow that's even better for you.
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  38. Man, you guys are TOUCHY. The alcohol part is easy peasy, it's hard finding: Platinum to filter vodka through. Diamonds to filter vodka through. An iceberg to melt down to proof the vodka with. Thinking about sending a team of explorers to the north pole to core drill for ice to be used to dilute the vodka. Or maybe some hidden spring in the depths of the Amazon, rumored to be the real fountain of youth. (Note: Not the actual jungle in South America, I'm talking about just buying some bottled water on Amazon.com). Jesus, maybe do both, and filter it through
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  39. It doesn't 'counteract'. It completed with the methanol in your liver and prevents additional toxic by-products of methanol. They guy may well be permanently blind. Methanol in the ferment mostly comes from methyl groups in the wash, so some fruit brandies (esp fruits with a lot of pectin ,brambles & cherry IIRC) have a lot of methanol in the heads cut. OTOH there is remarkably very little in grain. So if you are drinking brandy heads, or even select heads off a large batch whiskey you could go blind. OTOH If you left all the heads in a whiskey it wouldn't be a problem (except for f
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