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bluestar

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bluestar last won the day on November 16 2018

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About bluestar

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  • Birthday 09/11/1956

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    http://quincystreetdistillery.com

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    Chicagoland & Southwest Michigan

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  1. Yes, correct. As a born Washingtonian, I made the effort to get the out-of-state shippers certificate so that I can place some product at retailers there. But it is a challenging market, given the large number of craft distillers in the state able to sell directly to retailers, and outside of greater Seattle area, not that large a market. It was also confusing over the past few years as the rules changed rapidly following the major change in their liquor laws.
  2. Washington, if you mean the state, allows various forms of self-distribution where no distributor has to be appointed.
  3. I would suspect a deep tails cut could explain it. Don't know where they get their corn, but we've had trouble with that kind of flavor in a test run when the corn ended up having picked up a touch of mold.
  4. It is about a third, for us, paying urban rates for electric, power, and water/sewer.
  5. Sorry, correct if you are buying or selling as packaged. But I believe any repackaging would require a federal permit of some kind.
  6. Where are you finding them for $1 FOB Chicago? What quantity? I haven't seen them that cheap. You can PM me.
  7. We have good experience working with Berlin. If you can pick up at warehouse will-call, definitely worth considering, since shipping can be comparable to cost of goods. Their prices above 1000 bottles are competitive for PET. While glass has its appeal, PET will reduce breakage, cost less, and is cheaper to ship because of reduced weight. If you are bottling very small quantities, hand filling on an Enolmatic with small-bottle accessory is doable.
  8. If you see any increase in proof, you may be too dry in the winter, unless you are going in at very low proof. We see early initial loss in volume, but that is both angel's share and devil's cut. The latter will scale with size too, due to change in surface to volume ratio, and also the humidity and grain structure in the wood. 2% loss from devil's cut in a 53g is not unusual, so a 30g could be twice that, and a 10g could be more than 3x that. At the most extreme, for total loss, we have seen more than 50% loss after 2 years in a 5g barrel, compared to 10% for a 53g barrel. So, 20% loss for a 30g barrel does not seem so unusual, especially in a dry environment.
  9. You can buy and sell denatured industrial ethanol without a DSP permit, although you will need an SDA permit. But if you want to process ethanol, beverage or industrial, you need a DSP permit. So, if you are handling pure (not denatured) industrial ethanol to repackage, or if you are proofing down denatured spirits, you would need a DSP.
  10. Yes, beet ethanol (as neutral spirit) was used in France for many spirits and liqueurs, especially once grape became scarce during phylloxera epidemics. Most notably, it was used for many absinthes. Beet sugar "rums" like Stroh's were never made from molasses, but from beet syrup, second to last step product in refining beet sugar. Still a challenge to make a good spirit from that. I did my own tests making beet syrup "rum".
  11. Correct, it is the waste from beet sugar refining. It's disgusting. It can not be consumed by humans, inedible. I think it can be consumed by livestock. The only way you might want to use it for spirit is if you distill the ferment to completely neutral spirit.
  12. Theoretically that is true. BUT, we did tests and found that while the peroxide cured EPDM gaskets don't appear to degrade in performance as gaskets, it does allow a small amount of leachate to be picked up by the spirit if the EPDM is downstream of the still head in the path of high-temperature, high-proof spirit (like between the dephlegmator and the condensor). For that location, we use platinum-cured translucent silicone. These might toughen a bit over long use, but they hold up to temperature, and we don't observe any leachate.
  13. EPDM is okay near RT. No good at high temps with high proof alcohol. Charts shown here don't address this.
  14. And if you DID care about HISTORICAL precedent, you would not restrict barrel size to larger than 50 gal. Only used after WWII. Prior common sizes included 48 gal "standard" barrel and 31 gal US beer barrel, and the early spirits barrel at 40 gal. And the earliest bourbon barrels may have been the smaller, narrow "blood" cask.
  15. Where are u? Does the price include shipping?
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