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paulNL

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About paulNL

  • Rank
    Contributor

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  • Website URL
    www.meanie.nl

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Delft, the Netherlands
  • Interests
    White spirits
  1. paulNL

    Proofing....hydrometer vs Anton Paar

    The Snap 50 has been succeeded by the Snap 51, however accuracy and repeatabillity haven't changed AFAIK.
  2. paulNL

    Kothe K900N vodka production

    Mosaic, you might want to look at iStill (www.iStill.eu), they have fully automated stills which can do everything from potstill up to 40 redistillations for vodka at the touch of a button. And with the optional agitator and heat exchanger you can also mash in the same unit. Four day training (in English) can be followed at their Amsterdam training center.
  3. paulNL

    Spirits Competitions

    San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles... Those seem to be the important ones as seen from the other side of the Atlantic. Google is your friend!
  4. Err... The reasons for being near flowing water is obvious isn't it? Free water for cooling and cleaning, and if the quality is alright also for mashing and diluting. And if you put a water mill in also free power... I've got an electronic archive with around 70 old books (>10yr, up to 500yr) about distilling, including a few which are pre-1900 and in English - but they might come from the UK or somewhere else in the English speaking world. Just send me a message and I'll sort and share 'em with you.
  5. paulNL

    How do you sell your spirits?

    Hello Thatch, my 2c: although in a completely different country (NL) I face the exact same issue over here. Am allowed to sell to bars, restaurants and liquor stores. The two main things I've learned in the last year are: - a. only go after companies that sell drinks in your price bracket (in my case 55 USD a bottle average retail price; so that's Michelin starred restaurants and specialty liquor stores) and - b. try to find some "ambassadors" who can introduce you (in my case several well-known chefs and a sommelier who worked at ** starred restaurants) Once you meet people immediately become friends with them on LinkedIn and FaceBook so once people look you up they see you know many of their colleagues. One more thing: try to find out what the typical markup is, so ask someone you know in a liquor store or a bar/restaurant (different) for the formula they use to go from purchase price to sales price for a bottle or a glass. Paul.
  6. The one I have is only available in the EU, but an almost identical one is sold in the US for almost exactly the same price. I think it's called the Zap Labeler. Just Google "site:adiforums.com manual labeler" and you should find a suitable product. The roller on the front of the machine (nearest to you) should be adjustable, left side should be set a bit further out for a bottle that's smaller at the bottom (which goes on the right side, so the top of the bottle is pointing to the left).
  7. I use a similar round bottle which is smaller at the bottom, couldn't find any semi automatic labeler <5K USD that can work with that. In the end I bought a 500 dollar manual labeler, that works fine. Do remember that you can't have a label that goes around (almost) the whole bottle, but you'll be fine with a conventional front and rear label. For square bottles I'm going to buy the AP550, at the moment I apply them by hand.
  8. paulNL

    Activated carbon filtering Vodka for Gin production

    I don't think it's wise to put 65% ABV alcohol into the boiler for your gin run anyway...
  9. paulNL

    Square Bottle Labeler

    Primera AP550e
  10. paulNL

    Subbing out production

    One other way to start small but plan for growth is doing the production yourself, find a botteling plant and get pricing from them (but don't use 'em yet!), and buy the bare minimum botteling equipment. This way you can start cheaply, if business picks up speed you distill many times a week and outsource the botteling while waiting for your bigger still to arrive... This is exactly what I'm doing, space is limited but once I grow I move out the empty and filled bottles and boxes and will have no problem installing a 500 gallon or bigger still which makes one hell of a lot of gin per day... If I outgrow that there's enough money to buy a bigger building without getting a mortgage
  11. Errr... So you're saying with the current interest it isn't profitable, and it won't be profitable unless a possible buyer can get considerably cheaper (or free) financing? Just askin'
  12. paulNL

    Already read content resurfacing

    UPDATE Once I used "Mark site read" function the problem went away...
  13. paulNL

    Prepair for the FALLOUT!!!

    What nabtastic says. I'm new in this industry but I hardly have any debt, and the amount of bottles I have to sell each month to pay interest and recurring costs is sow low I can carry it in one go, and I'm not Hulk Hogan's healthy nephew. Keep costs low, even if it means making other products then you originally intended (in my case gin instead of whisky), design your business to be as efficiant as possible, do not try to out-compete cheap brands and make sure you have some other income if business starts slowly (which it probably does).
  14. paulNL

    Can we do something about the spammers?

    In that case the reports don't work, from the moment Foreshot posted the message above I've used the "Report post" button on every new piece of spam I found. Haven't counted them but I think at least five.
  15. paulNL

    glycerin

    Mouth feel. Especially important for neutral products, like vodka.
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