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Skaalvenn

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Skaalvenn last won the day on May 9

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About Skaalvenn

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    Minnesota
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    Photography, outdoors and travel.

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  1. Tried sending you a PM but I think your inbox is full. Any suggestions for where to start on creating a remotely accessable monitoring system? Not looking to automate anything at this time, just send the still's data to a couple different screens/devices. Thanks!
  2. I think our electric price is right around $0.14 to $0.15 per kilowatt hour. With a 125 gallon capacity stripping still and a 65 gallon finishing still our electric bill was hitting $1,000 per month without running the air conditioner or a lot of other expensive machinery. We are just upgrading to steam, and I'm expecting our electrical savings to be around $600 to $700 per month (not to mention labor!). So, running gas lines and installing a boiler might be expensive, but how much of that would be offset by reducing your electric bill? The added bonus of steam is that I had the system plumbed so that adding a second still or mash tun is going to be a ridiculously easy install compared to adding another electric still.
  3. The brick and mortar business side is fairly easy. Assets, debts, and revenue can all be figured out by an accountant or business broker as others suggested. The hard part is if the actual brand/trademarks/IP are worth anything. Most are not (despite what the owners believe), but some can valuable if you find the right buyer.
  4. I spoke to someone there who answered the phone as doctor so and so and asked them about their products. Said I was looking for the most amount of fermentable sugars, the least ash and other non-fermentables, and that's the product that doctor so and so recommended. I took their advice, and regret it. Thankfully it was only a single tote.
  5. Those who have used multiple systems, what are a few things that you like/dislike about the systems you have used? I've only used Hoochware, and I like it...but it's also all I know. I will say that I've talked to the owner a dozen or so times, and met him at the ACSA, and he's a great guy.
  6. Exact same way a petroleum plant cracks crude into it's different grades of fuel. Google some YouTube videos, it's all about flow, temperature control and having a good design. If you have all of those you can know exactly which plates are pulling heads/hearts/tails.
  7. Not all molasses is the same. I've had some 100% molasses runs end at around 1.015 and I've had some utterly garbage stuff (double s is the company) that wouldn't go below 1.040 (adding a few pounds of sugar restarted the ferment so I know it wasn't a nutrient or yeast issue).
  8. Hoover food grade stainless IBCs. You can purchase or lease them. Leasing is a very economical way to start.
  9. Some videos This first one doesn't denonstrate correct shaft placement. They simply put it off center yet still vertical and say "see". This second video actually shows the correct placement, and it's very easy to see that it works much better than the other placements.
  10. Because a mixer in a cylindrical vessel shouldn't be straight down and in the middle. It should be offset and angled with the mixing blades pushing the liquid down, not up. A vertical shaft in the middle of a cylinder will be prone to vortex, which can easily cause the shaft to wobble and potentially fail, and it will also not mix efficiently. Some manufacturers will put little blades on the sides of the tank to stop the vortex and to promote better mixing --but it's a solution to the problem of poor engineering. A vertical system will also want to spin the liquid, and once it's spinning with the shaft the mixing blades won't cause as much turbulence since their speed relative to the liquid has gone down dramatically. Mixing blades that are "pulling up" typically won't mix that well, and you'll probavly get a terrible amount of surface splashing (remember, there's a jet of fluid coming from the blades). The direction the shaft spins isn't important as long as the entire system is made to spin that direction. So, multiple reasons.
  11. I'd never feel comfortable re-purposing an item which previously held a toxic material, I also don't think it's legal to do. https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/UCM374510.pdf 7-203.11 Poisonous or Toxic Material Containers A container previously used to store POISONOUS OR TOXIC MATERIALS may not be used to store, transport or dispense FOOD.
  12. Duratherm. https://durathermfluids.com/ They have food safe high temperature transfer fluids as well (in case there's a leak).
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