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Found 12 results

  1. Hopped Whiskey(?)

    I know a lot of us distill beer from a local brewer that is either custom brewed or more likely something old or off that they need to destroy. So I submit a COLA for said whiskey and get told you need a Formula. Submit formula and it is approved as "spirits specialty" (can't call it whiskey). Any comments regarding hopped whiskeys? PM me if necessary. Thanks, Greg
  2. Unique Opening in VA

    Head Brew-Stiller Hampton, VA ABOUT THE BREWERY: We have broken ground on the first ever Brewpub/Distillery in Virginia. This venue will house a 10BBL 3 vessel brewhouse, 1000L pot still, 200 seating restaurant and a “entertainment venue” with an occupancy totaling 1175. All this will be housed in a Nationally Registered Historic Armory in the heart of Hampton Roads! ABOUT THE POSITION: This is an exciting opportunity for someone that has a passion for quality craft beer/spirits and can navigate a startup business. We’re looking for someone to help us build systems and processes on a new 10 BBL brewhouse and 1000L pot still. The right candidate will be creative, safety-minded, efficient, quality-focused, possess a great work ethic, a positive attitude, and be a team player. As part of the management team, the Head Brew-Stiller will be expected to contribute to our continued growth, constantly displaying a high level of maturity, responsibility, and pride in our work. You will have the opportunity to show your creativity by making exceptional beers/spirits. RESPONSIBILITIES: The Head Brew-Stiller is responsible for the brewing operations; including brewing, fermentation, cellaring, and packaging. Distilling operations; milling, mashing, distilling, tasting, proofing, blending and bottling. Other duties include but are not limited to: • Develop new recipes and improve existing recipes with input from owners • Set the brewing/distilling schedule and maintain inventories of raw materials and finished beer/spirits • Manage yeast per best practices and industry standards, including pitching, cropping, and monitoring yeast • Ensure the highest quality and consistency through use of best practices, including lab tests to monitor and troubleshoot fermentation, in-process, and finished beer/spirits • Cleaning and sanitation of all equipment and work areas • Ensure product quality in the pub by helping clean lines, checking CO2, etc.; work closely with pub staff and provide training about beer/spirits knowledge • Perform equipment maintenance, troubleshooting problems that arise, and repair as needed • Help maintain and develop additional standard operating procedures that ensure all aspects of beer/spirits production and packaging align with safety, sanitary, and quality protocols while allowing for process improvement and workflow efficiency Be an active brewery representative, including attending promotional events and festivals, occasionally participating in tours and other educational and marketing events Assist the owner and other team members in developing growth strategies; assist in hiring and training brewery/distillery employees; effectively communicate (written and oral) with the owners, staff, sales team and others to create a supportive work environment QUALIFICATIONS: • 5 plus years professional experience as a production brewer/distiller • Formal brewing/distilling training (certificate/diploma) from a recognized and accredited brewing/distilling program (Siebel, UC-Davis, etc.) is a plus • Strong knowledge of brewing/distilling techniques, quality control, lab analytics and interpreting the results, yeast management, cleaning and sanitation, cellaring and packaging, and equipment • Experience in recipe formulation and development; a high degree of curiosity to use new ingredients and flavor combinations • Knowledge of developing and documenting formalized Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for all processes • A commitment to safety and quality by following industry standards, best practices, and OSHA regulations and requirements • Strong organization and time management skills and attention to detail; ability to multi-task; flexible schedule which includes nights and weekends as needed • Ability to work well as a member of a team and also independently • Strong oral and written communication skills and ability to give and take constructive feedback • A friendly attitude and willingness to interact with customers in the pub and at festivals and events Strong work ethic and flexibility as the brewery expands COMPENSATION: This full time position pays a competitive salary with benefits, sick leave, paid vacation and all your favorite beer/spirits/live music in one place. In addition, incentives for performance and growth goals. Please send resume/questions to TheVanguard757@gmail.com
  3. Transfer Beer

    Hello! We are the sister company of a brewery in New Orleans and are wondering what steps we need to take in order to properly transfer and report beer from the brewery to the distillery. Has anyone else done this before? We were told we needed to simply transfer the beer in bond but we can't find any paperwork for that and are curious about reporting on both sides. Any help would be appreciated! THX
  4. To easily apply, please send resume to amanda@forcebrands.com JOB DESCRIPTION: We are looking for a passionate and dedicated brewer to join our startup brewery in the greater New York City area. This is a great opportunity for someone looking to join a brewery in the beginning phases and assist in bringing the brewery to life. JOB RESPONSIBILITIES: All elements of brewhouse operations that include, but are not limited to: grain handling, wort production, spent grain handling, wort cooling, general maintenance and cleaning All elements of cellar operations that include, but are not limited to: operation of DE filter, beer transfers, dry hopping, carbonation, tank cleaning and sanitation, general maintenance and cleaning All elements of packaging operations that include, but are not limited to: keg cleaning and filling, can filling operations, carbonation, general maintenance and cleaning Execution and document maintenance of stringent quality management protocols that include, but are not limited to: fermentation rates, pH value testing throughout production and packaging process, water quality, cleaning and sterilization of main brewery equipment and ancillary equipment Working with the laboratory team who carry out further tests to improve the product Recipe formulation for new core, seasonal, and specialty beers Working with the COO and Head Brewer regarding supplier contracts and procurement of raw materials Maintaining the safety and effective operation of brewery equipment and other related machinery JOB REQUIREMENTS & QUALIFICATIONS: Background / Experience Requirements: Candidate must be 21 years of age or older University degree in organic chemistry, food science, biotechnology, chemical or process engineering, microbiology or related fields required Competency in brewing science Minimum of 3+ years’ experience in a production brewery Must have good manual dexterity skills and proficient knowledge of the equipment and heavy machinery used to prepare, package and store beer Lab experience as well as implementation and execution of quality management programs preferred Prior supervisory experience preferred Strong work ethic Ability to give and receive feedback Ability to work independently as well as in small teams Proficiency in Microsoft Office suite A sense of humor To easily apply, please send resume to amanda@forcebrands.com
  5. What happens when you have the idea for a truly differentiated hard cider? A hard cider that makes beer nerds order cider between his or her coffee stout and imperial IPA. One that makes a brewmaster reconsider what he or she knows about fermentation. One that turns a Bud Light drinker into a lover of craft beverages because his love of craft started with our brand. I'll tell you what happens, by any means necessary, you learn how to make it. It doesn't matter how much you know about fermentation, large scale production, or quality assurance; you read a few books and learn how to make it because in your heart you know it's possible. After that, you sell that cider. Then you buy more and more equipment to make more and more cider and hire a few people to help you. Then, one day, you wake and realize, "I have no idea what I'm doing anymore. I'm wayyyy out of my league. This has happened so fast I didn't have the opportunity to learn how to do things properly but, our cider is loved by so many people and we are growing so fast we must be doing something right... right?" After this, you think, "I need help with this. Everything else in the business in under control but, I want our production to be rock solid; after all, we are a hard cider company." Then, you write what you hope this person will do... it goes a little something like this... The CiderMaster (Production Manager) will work closely with the Executive Management team to ensure a consistency with process and cider production goals. This position oversees management of the cider operations team as well as quality control. They will work closely with production planning and purchasing. As part of the management team, the CiderMaster will be expected to contribute to our continued growth and expansion initiatives. ​If interested in more info or if you have referrals - please reach out to Ashley Schult at ashley@forcebrands.com
  6. Hops in Whiskey

    I am looking make a whiskey from a hopped beer. Before I started my trials I wanted to see if anyone had some input. A few of my questions are: How do bittering vs late hop additions influence the character? Does dry hopping have an effect? Anything to look out for in the cuts? Anything else you think I should know? Thanks, Max
  7. I can only seem to find info about transported tax paid and non-tax paid spirits, but nothing about transporting something like wine, cider, or beer into a distillery. For transporting the spirits, I know there is the TTB form - http://www.ttb.gov/forms/f510016.pdf - as well as a need to pay tax on the spirits. For transporting various wash materials that contain alcohol, are there any hoops to jump? Cheers, hon
  8. I have attached a photo of a few of the beautiful Vendome 500 gallon copper kettles that I have. I also have one 3000 gallon Copper Vacuum pans and three Stainless Steel units. Junior
  9. I've got a new project underway: a whisky distilled from full-flavored craft beer. I'm teaming up with a local brewery for the mash/wash. Working on the stripping runs as I type. Really excited about this project, however, it is my first go using oak barrels... My goal is to produce a whisky with a flavor profile more reminiscent of the beer from which it was distilled rather than being oak dominant. With this goal I'm currently intending on using 15 gallon medium toast barrels. The hope is this will allow for a rather quick oaking (~6 months) that is still apparent but subtle. Since my goal is to leave the beer from which the whisky was distilled as the dominate flavor profile I'm going with a med toast barrel rather than charred. Sounds like many craft whisky distillers are using charred oak barrels and hence that is why I'm seeking opinions in regards to my project. I'm thinking a charred barrel would bring too much oak into the spirit. Shouldn't need the charring to clean up the spirit either as the cuts are being made very conservatively. So, what is your opinion? Should I go the route of a toasted barrel or utilize a charred barrel? I appreciate any and all opinions/insight. Thanks!
  10. I've got a new project underway: a whisky distilled from full-flavored craft beer. I'm teaming up with a local brewery for the mash/wash. Working on the stripping runs as I type. Really excited about this project, however, it is my first go using oak barrels... My goal is to produce a whisky with a flavor profile more reminiscent of the beer from which it was distilled rather than being oak dominant. With this goal I'm currently intending on using 15 gallon medium toast barrels. The hope is this will allow for a rather quick oaking (~6 months) that is still apparent but subtle. Since my goal is to leave the beer from which the whisky was distilled as the dominate flavor profile I'm going with a med toast barrel rather than charred. Sounds like many craft whisky distillers are using charred oak barrels and hence that is why I'm seeking opinions in regards to my project. I'm thinking a charred barrel would bring too much oak into the spirit. Shouldn't need the charring to clean up the spirit either as the cuts are being made very conservatively. So, what is your opinion? Should I go the route of a toasted barrel or utilize a charred barrel? I appreciate any and all opinions/insight. Thanks!
  11. Hi everyone, I'm still in the process of building a startup plan for a micro in southern NH. I've been thinking about having a local mico-brewery do my mashing,fermenting,etc and then tank transport it to my facility. Or maybe just do the mashing and I do the fermenting (might be easier from a legal standpoint). Eventually I want to do it all but in the startup phase this might be a better way to do it. II'd like to work with a local brewer with my recipe specs and create small 100~200 gallon beer batches a week. Searching the ADI forums I have found similar posts but they are a bit contradictory Some say its illegal to transport fermented low wine while others say they have done it or are currently doing it , Reference: http://adiforums.com/index.php?showtopic=8&hl=%2Bbulk+%2Bbeer I'm curious to hear from other members who have done it in the past, who are doing it now or have tried it unsuccessfully. Thanks for everyones comments and suggestions, Kevin
  12. My teens and early twenties had me in Seattle watching an explosion of "beer culture" with small micro breweries popping up in every 'hood and locals having real pride in the neighbourhood brewing. I moved to central Virginia, into a desert of beer. Over the last 7 years a dozen small breweries have popped up and there is a new excitement in the area for local beverages. I have been brewing beer for 8+ years with a simple set up. and have become quite good considering. I really just developed a taste for bourbon in the last year and a half because of bourbon aged beers. Richmond, VA has only 2 tiny distilleries for 1.3 million people. Cirrus makes just potato vodka (world class) and reservoir distilling makes 3 whiskeys, all real tasty but very expensive. A couple of years ago Seattle changed a state law that allows special treatment of distillers that use 51% grains from washington state. Because of this special treatment there has been an explosion of craft distilling all over the state. Now Virginia softened restrictions on breweries and the law has implications on distilling in the state also. I guess what I am getting at is, there is a renaissance in artisan distilling ready to swell up in my adopted home and I want to be part of it. It is also obvious to me that much of the equipment is shared with brewing and there is really an opportunity to co-op the development of brewing and distilling. I have volunteered at breweries in the past but my efforts to help out the local distillers have been rebuffed surprisingly. (moderately skilled labor for FREE!...no thanks) I visited a tiny hobby distillery in Washington state that was little more than a farmers shed and 2 bored retirees. They let me participate in a day's work and I really enjoyed it. But their goal to not die of boredom isn't really a business plan. They might as well make jam or apple butter to sell on the roadside. I would like to hook up with some growing breweries, and make small batch spirits that reflect the local agriculture and palate. I have been watching Catoctin Creek and Wasmund's (copper fox) impressive growth. And think the Troy and sons development is inspiring. Educate me... and help me develop some relationships that will lead to understanding whether i should put this to bed or make a go of it. Thanks
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