Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'tmit'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Covid-19 Response
    • Hand Sanitizer Production
    • Updated Guidance
    • Sanitizer Supplies - Supply Chain - Etc.
  • Terms & Forum Business
    • Terms of Service for ADI Forum Users
    • Forum Business
  • Welcome, ADI News & General
    • Welcome & Introduce Yourself
    • ADI News & Events
    • Beginners
    • General Discussion
    • Business Opportunities
    • Speakeasy
  • Producing Product
    • Equipment
    • Packaging
    • Technique
    • Safety
    • Slow Distillation
  • Spirit Specific
    • Vodka
    • Whiskey
    • Gin
    • Rum
    • Absinthe (and other herbals)
    • Brandy
    • Distilled Spirit Specialty
  • Selling Your Product
    • Sales & Marketing
    • Distribution
    • Distillery Tasting Room
  • Government & Guilds
    • Federal Gov't
    • State
    • Local Issues
    • State Distillers Guilds
    • Canada
  • Marketplace
    • For Sale - Peer to Peer
    • For Sale by Vendors
    • Wanted To Buy
    • Marketplace Archive [Closed]
  • Career Archive
    • Help Wanted [Closed]
    • Job Wanted [Closed]

Categories

There are no results to display.

Blogs

  • Scott @ Twenty2Vodka's HighProofSpirit Infusing Blog
  • emutch's Blog
  • mitchabate's Blog
  • EZdrinking
  • Self Distribution
  • Luwest's Blog
  • Black Water Barrels

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 27 results

  1. Good Day My Dearest ADI Readers, Ah … the days continue to come and go, and things have been VERY BUSY in the world of InsuranceMan 2.0!!! No binge-watching Tiger King at my fortress of solitude!!! During these temporarily strange times, it is great to know that so many of you are out there still producing your products, making sanitizer products, and yes, many of you are still opening new distilleries. It warms my super-heart to know that things are still moving along, albeit in a direction that we did not necessarily plan on for the time being. With that, I know that I shared some information a little while back on an insurance carrier that I have been working with for about the last 10 months, but I wanted to revisit this with you. Recently, I have been writing an incredible amount of distilleries with this carrier simply due to the fact that they offer amazing coverage and recently they have been coming in anywhere from 15% up to 52% (yes, that was typed correctly, FIFTY-TWO PERCENT) less than anyone else in the marketplace. I would STRONGLY encourage all of you in the following states to get a hold of me: Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. If you are located in any of these states and would like to save a bunch of money on your insurance premiums, you need to get in touch with me. The application process is simple, the coverage is among the best of any carriers out there, you can save a bundle of dough, and the pièce de résistance is … you get to work with a real life insurance superhero … ME … InsuranceMan 2.0!!! Talk about a win-win-win-win situation!!! If you are in one of these states and are just getting up and going, if your renewal is just around the corner, or even if you just reupped your coverage and are in the midst of a policy currently, it is never too late to make the switch and start saving. I look forward to hearing from each and every one of you in these 11 states. Until next time, dear reader … Stay Vigilant!!! Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! (307)752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  2. Good day to you wonderful ADI’ers, In this installment of the TMIT, I am going to keep things short and sweet. As this pandemic wreaks havoc upon our world daily and forces us to change many of our day-to-day activities, it is important to keep up with and stay fluid in regard to many different aspects of our lives. A few weeks back it was the battle to have insurance companies allow for the sale or donation of hand sanitizer. ***** Quick update to that as well, Philadelphia Insurance Companies has come out and stated the following on this topic: ”We can now confirm coverage for distilleries manufacturing and selling hand sanitizer, provided they’re selling the hand sanitizer at cost. So, our updated statement is that We can confirm coverage if certain conditions are met: · The insured does not have a contract to manufacture hand sanitizer for any entity. If a contract exists, we first need to review the contract before we can confirm coverage. · The hand sanitizer is sold “at cost” · There are no warranties or guarantees for any products. · If a communicable disease exclusion is not present on the policy, we need to add it in order to confirm coverage. · Adherence to WHO controls as outlined by the website: https://www.who.int/gpsc/5may/Guide_to_Local_Production.pdf “ ***** So, good news there. This has been something I have been working on for quite some time. Anyway, now the big battle is that folks are having difficulty making ends meet during these crazy times. Not being open or able to sell goods, products, or services is an economic impact that truly knows no bounds. How are people to pay ongoing bills without the ability to sell things, go to work and make money, and on and on. It is getting tough out there for many. That is where I, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! am here to come to the rescue. I promised “them” that I would not say who “they” are, but I have worked with many different insurance companies over the last few days to come up with some viable solutions during this worldwide emergency. With that said, if you are struggling with finances currently I would suggest reaching out to your insurance company, not necessarily your agent, but the actual underwriting company, and more specifically the BILLING DEPARTMENT, and let them know you are having some financial issues. Chances are that they will allow you to reduce your March and April payments, or possibly even skip them altogether without fear of cancellation. YES, IT IS TRUE!!! You very well may be able to make a small payment or none at all through until the month of May. Again, this is an ever-changing situation and that is why this is being offered until May for many carriers at this time. Dependent upon how long this all lasts will determine if this offer is potentially extended. Do yourselves a favor though, check into this and see if your carrier is offering this assistance at this time. Any little bit helps, and I am always here, on the front lines watching out for you. It’s just what insurance-superhero’s do. Until Next Time, Dear Reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! (307)752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  3. Safe and healthy Friday to you all, I know that I missed the Tuesday installment of the TMIT, but I did want to get a post out to all of you today. As you may or may not know, I sit on the City Council in Sheridanopolis and recently my time has been devoted to a localized issue that I know many of you may be facing on a national level as well. It fells like months ago, but it was just recently I was fighting the insurance companies to allow for the manufacturing of hand sanitizer. Now, I have been embroiled in the crafting of an ordinance that has taken a lot of time and kept me from my TMIT posting this last week. What was the ordinance you may ask? It was an emergency ordinance allowing for the delivery of alcoholic beverages from liquor stores, microbreweries, wineries, distilleries, meaderies, cideries, etc., as long as they have the proper licensing in place for the sale of their goods. Up until now, this was deemed as not permissible due to state and local statue. With the passing of this ordinance, which did unanimously pass, these folks are now able to sell and then deliver alcoholic goods to private citizens and their residences. WOOHOO!!! In these crazy times of “physical distancing” (InsuranceMan 2.0!!! refuses to say “social distancing”, we can still stay social folks, we just need to stay physically away), it is important to be able to assist people in not going out, but we certainly want them to be able to get their food, medications, and ALCOHOL! After getting this passed, I was feeling pretty dang good. I wasn’t going to break my arm off patting myself on the back, but I was pretty pleased with myself. WELL, NOT SO FAST!!! The universe has a funny way of doing that to us, doesn’t it. As soon as I get the ordinance passed, I literally received an email from a business saying that their insurance company was PROHIBITING them, under the policy, from making any kind of delivery. That it would be excluded and therefore, if they started delivering alcohol, they would have no coverage and likely be dropped!!! UGH!!! No rest for this superhero. On to the new fight I go. Thankfully, I have a lot of good friends in good places and I was able to quickly avert this crisis. I reached out, immediately to a myriad of underwriters and I am pleased to announce that I have several carriers that will allow for the delivery of alcohol. Mmmmmm …… pleased with myself twice in one day …….. no bad. With that being said, if you need coverage for the delivery of your product, or if you have local liquor retailers selling your product, CHECK YOUR INSURANCE TO SEE IF IT IS COVERED!!! I am being inundated with folks reaching out to me telling me their agent and/or carrier are saying they are not allowed to deliver their goods. If you, or someone you know finds that they are not going to be allowed to deliver alcohol, have them call me, email me, text me, raise the InsuranceMan 2.0!!! signal to the sky … whatever it takes, and I will fix their problem. We need to band together, people, and be part of a solution, not part of the many problems that we face on a daily basis now. Retail Liquor Stores, Distilleries, Microbreweries, whatever … if they are having issues that are keeping them from doing business, let me get them back to business as usual (or BIGGER business as this looks like this is how it is going to be for a while). The ultimate goal is to keep your sales up during this time so let me assist you or your sellers in doing so. Until next time, dear reader … Stay Vigilant, healthy, and safe, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  4. Healthy Tuesday Morning to you all, I truly hope my post finds you doing well and staying that way. The most important thing during these uncertain times is to remain positive. I know that with all is going on in the world and the economy, and businesses being shut down, it is sometimes hard to find things to remain positive about, but they are still out there. For one, it is St. Patrick's Day. That is a good thing!!! Maybe grab yourself a "Black & Tan" or a "Guinness", and focus on the day and all that you do have to be thankful for. Cheers to you, my friends. As I sit here in my lair of solitude, or as I know understand it to be known, "My lair of social-distancing", I am being inundated with questions and emails from clients and carriers alike. People have been asking and continue to ask, "What if we are shut down due to this virus? Is there some type of insurance coverage that may kick in?" Carriers have been sending out a flurry of informational emails that also speak to this topic and I wanted to share those with you here so that you can arm yourself with information as well. At this point in time, the insurance industry as well as specific carriers have been providing information in regard to Business Income (a.k.a. Business Interruption) & Extra Expense (hereafter known as BI/EE) coverage. This coverage is meant to provide for ongoing expenses and income reimbursement in the wake of a "covered cause of loss" that results in a business being shut down or slowing in sales as a result, as well as several other factors. The issue here is the definition of a "covered loss" or a "named peril". Currently, a pandemic, such as the Coronavirus, is not necessarily a covered loss or peril. Most policies have a Disease Exclusion, but even if they do not contain that specific language, unless your facility has been contaminated and deemed "inhabitable" or "not able to be used as intended", there is no coverage applicable due to this virus. I know that this is not necessarily the news you were hoping for, especially if you are in on of the states that is experiencing a mandatory shutdown of bars, restaurants, and other business, (or gatherings of over 10 people ... REALLY!) but keep in mind, I am here to assist you in whatever way possible, and I am just wanting to communicate the information to you so that you can arm yourselves with knowledge and know what to expect. I have also gone out to several different carriers and asked them about the possibility of coverage under the "CIVIL AUTHORITY" aspect of the policy. Again, unless there is a shutdown of an area due to a "covered 'loss'", BI/EE coverage would not apply. Let's say for instance that you are in a multi-tenant building and your neighboring business has been identified as property that has been contaminated by the Coronavirus and is therefore shutdown. Due to the fact that you may share ventilation (maybe), or perhaps a common lobby area or some-other-such "commonality", your business is now shutdown due to civil authority. This may be a BI/EE claim due to the fact that they have shut you down in order to determine if the virus has spread to your property. At the end of the day, we could sit and come up with a billion and one different scenarios in regard to this pandemic and the potential impacts that it is having around the US, and the world. In the end though, it would all just be speculation and "what-ifs" and not result in any certainties. As I have said in prior posts, and I will say again here, when in doubt, file a claim. If you feel there is legitimacy in filing a claim, then do so. That is why you have insurance. Hopefully, armed with this information, it will assist you with knowing where you stand in the process. Until next time dear readers ... Stay Vigilant (and healthy. WASH THOSE HANDS), Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  5. Good Friday to you dear ADI readers, As you know (or you should know by now), I put up a TMIT entitled “Coronavirus” that was done in jest to try and alleviate some of the stress and tension that is surrounding this pandemic. It was done for fun and to be funny. This virus IS a serious issue and is having economic ramifications that are far and wide and will be felt for quite a while to come. With that, I did want to put up a more serious insurance post. I, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! have been speaking with quite a few clients recently asking about how insurance may apply to this virus. More specifically, is there any kind of coverage that may pay for diminished sales due to the pandemic? What about if our employees contract the disease? Well, dear reader, let me address these quarries here so that you can know and be well informed too. The first question I will address is this, “Is there any type of coverage for a disruption to my business due to the Coronavirus?” The short answer is that it simply depends on a lot of things. It depends on what carrier underwrites your policy. It depends furthermore on the language of the policy, as well as the coverage options that you have chosen. One area that this potentially could see coverage would be under your “Business Income (or “Interruption”) & Extra Expense” (hereafter referred to as BI/EE) portion of your coverage. If you do not have that coverage, then there is no coverage available. Some carriers offer it as part of their overall suite of coverage enhancements, with others it has to be specifically asked for and a premium charge usually results. The only way to know if you have this type of coverage would be to check your policy or call your agent, or send them an email, or whatever you chose. Generally speaking, BI/EE coverage usually requires that a covered direct physical loss take place to the insured property. So, the question becomes this, is a pandemic a direct physical loss to your insured property? The quick answer would be no. It is not like a fire, wind incident, or smoke damage type of encounter that is normally contemplated and associated with this type of coverage trigger. However, several courts have determined that “property damage” can include property that is deemed “uninhabitable” or “otherwise unfit for its intended use” to be included in the meaning of “commercial property” which then may make this a covered direct physical loss. With this scenario mentioned above, if you facility were to be shut down due to the Coronavirus, for decontamination, etc., then it is quite possible that a case could be made that your facility was deemed “uninhabitable” or “unfit for its intended use” and therefore the BI/EE coverage could be contemplated. However, if patrons just have decided not to go out and eat, drink, socialize, and have a good time, it would be very difficult to say that the drop in sales is a DIRECT EFFECT of the Coronavirus. It may be a correlation, but in a courtroom that may not be enough to show cause as a certain DIRECT RESULT of loss of business. Interestingly though, what if the whole area surrounding your business is shutdown and quarantined? This could also be known as a “CIVIL AUTHORITY” closure and that is usually specifically addressed in the BI/EE section of the policy. Here is a snippet from a policy I recently wrote for a client: Civil Authority We will pay for the actual “loss” of Business Income you sustain, and necessary Extra Expense you incur that is caused by action of civil authority that prohibits access to the described premises due to direct physical “loss” of or damage to property, other than at the described premises, caused by or resulting from any Covered Cause of Loss. The coverage for Business Income will begin 72 hours after the time of that action and will apply for a period of up to four consecutive weeks after coverage begins. The coverage forExtra Expense will begin immediately after the time of that action and will end: a. Four consecutive weeks after the time of that action; or b. When your Business Income coverage ends; whichever comes first. Here we see again that language of “actual ‘loss’”, which this may qualify as since it goes on to say, “… described premises due to a direct physical “loss” of or damage to property …” As described above, “uninhabitable” or “unfit” may very well qualify in this case. You will notice though that there is a “72 hour” wait time, similar to a deductible, meaning that if you are shut down for less than 72 hours, coverage will not apply. As well, you will see specific language that states that the coverage will end after four consecutive weeks of being shut down or you exhaust your limit of coverage. Not to go too far down the rabbit hole here, but if you were shut down for a week due to civil authority (7-days), you would have a 3 day waiting period and potentially be eligible for 4 days’ worth of BI/EE. If they opened your area back up, but then shut it down again a day later that would constitute a separate event and the whole thing would start over again. If you were shut out of your facility for 2 months, well, the first 4 weeks (or potentially your full limit is reached) would be covered, but then it would end after that fourth consecutive week. Just wanted to clarify that. OK, what about the case where you are still up and running but you have a supplier that is not, and it is now impacting your operations? Or, you are still up and running but maybe the distributer is shutdown due to the virus? If you have the “Contingent Business Property” endorsement under you BI/EE coverage, you may have a claim. Here is another snippet from the same policy: Contingent Business Property We will pay for the actual “loss” of Business Income you sustain, and necessary Extra Expense you incur when Contingent Business Property is damaged by a Covered Cause of Loss. We will reduce the amount of your Business Income “loss,” other than Extra Expense, to the extent you can resume “operations,” in whole or in part, by using any other available: a. Source of materials; or b. Outlet for your products. The most we will pay under these sections B. 1., 2., and 3. combined is $300,000 for any one occurrence. As you can see here, there may be coverage for you to pay to source your materials from somewhere else, or to pay to assist you in selling your products through another outlet, if possible and permissible by state law, etc. The additional cost of these would reduce your BI/EE limit, but if you can stay operational even if it costs a bit more, but the carrier would pick up that difference (up to the $300,000 amount illustrated in this policy coverage), it would be better than having to out of pocket it yourself. This brings us to Workers Compensation and the impact of the virus. Workers compensation does cover employees that are injured on the job, either in a physical sense, or in a disease sense. The limits are even broken out as “Bodily Injury by Accident”, and “Bodily Injury by Disease”. Here again though, it is going t be difficult to make a claim simply due to the fact that it would have to be proven that your employee contracted this virus while performing duties associated with your business, i.e., while “on the clock”. Being that the virus can live on surfaces, or be transmitted in a number of different ways, and may lay dormant for a time period, it may be a challenge to pinpoint that your employee picked this up on work time and not on personal time. If this type of instance arises, I would advise that you proceed as normal by placing a claim with the workers comp company, have a claims representative assigned to your claim, and let them make the determination as to when and where the employee may have contracted the disease and if coverage is applicable or not. The end story here folks is that that whether you may be looking to put a claim in under your package policy for BI/EE, or if you are dealing with a sick employee, expect the insurance carriers to meet you head on with pushback. We are talking about a pandemic here that is far reaching and could end up being very costly … even more so that it already has been. It has and will continue to wreak havoc on our economy and I don’t know of anyone that will be jumping up and down waiving their hands in the air wanting to be first in line to pay for whatever the end result of all of this will be. I would advise however, the old adage of, “You won’t know if you don’t ask” may apply here. If you are shut down due to civil authority, or if you have an employee that believes they contracted the disease while at work, put in a claim. The worst that could happen is that the carrier says that there is no coverage and the best that could happen is that they say that there is and you obtain some relief. Either way, it is better to make the carrier out to be the big bad wolf than taking the fall yourself for not doing anything. I hope you all stay well, stay health, wash your hands like a surgeon scrubbing in for a 10 hour procedure, cover your coughs and sneezes, and just be safe. I, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! have a dear place in my heart for all of you and I want all the best for you. If you do have questions about how the virus may impact your business and if there is an insurance solution for it, or any other insurance questions at all, please do not hesitate to reach out to me. Until next time dear readers … Stay Vigilant (and healthy), Aaron Linden a.k.a InsuranceMan 2.0!!! (307)752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  6. Dearest ADI members, I truly hope you are all well, and staying that way in the midst of this crazy pandemic. I have to tell you, I am disappointed with the news and media sources in the light of the events unfolding around the world. I personally think that this virus is horrible, do not get me wrong, but I think that things have become overly sensationalized in recent days. The common flu causes more deaths annually than this virus has caused, yet we do not cancel sporting events, drop the stock market through the basement, and ban gathering of 250 people or more. I am not 100% sure what is happening, or why this has taken on such an incredibly gigantic pandemic status, but it has. It is serious, I understand and acknowledge that fact, I do. With that though, I think that the masses need to remain calm, take precautions, but also keep your normal life and sense of humor in these difficult, "toilet paper shortage" times. With that, I offer you an invaluable marketing tip in the face of economic adversity. Are you ready? OK, here it is. If you have been to your local "Stuff-Mart" or other "get all your stuff here" store, you have probably run into a TP shortage (which BTW's, I totally don't understand. This is not an intestinal distress virus ... so what gives with people hoarding toilet paper???!!?!?!?! Really?!?!??!) Anyway, alcohol is supposedly one of the things that staves this virus off, and with that, I am about to divulge one of the most masterful marketing ideas to assist in driving your sales in this time of insanity. Ready? Here it is! Yes!!!! This is a marketing strategy to ensure sales in this time of crisis! Take each of your bottles and place a new, unused roll of toilet paper on the neck of your bottle and change your pricing by 50%-100% and watch your product fly off the shelves! Alcohol is supposedly a virus deterrent, and toilet paper is a hot commodity. Partner the two and voilà, instant increase in sales, instant demand, and instant profits. You're welcome!!!! One last piece of advice ... I have also heard that the only known deterrents may also be what are known as "Biological Anxiety Reliefs" a.k.a. BARS, "radioactive unvirus medicine" a.k.a. RUM, and "vaccine official depression killing antigen" a.k.a. VODKA. Keep this in mind, and until next time dear reader ... Stay vigilant (and healthy), Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! (307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insurancman2.0@yahoo.com ********** OBVIOUSLY THIS POST IS ALL IN FUN AND AN ATTEMPT TO KEEP CALM AND LIGHT IN THE FACE OF THESE UNKNOWN TIMES. IF YOU KNOW ME, YOU KNOW THAT I LIKE TO JOKE AND HAVE FUN, EVEN WHEN THE GOING GETS TOUGH. IN THESE TIMES THE TOUGH KEEP GOING!!! **********
  7. Happiest of Tuesday Mornings, My super-senses are picking up that the most loyal readers out there are wondering what happened to last weeks post. Alas, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! was simply consumed in various activities that were vying for my undivided attention, and I simply could not break away to get the post up. For that, you have my greatest apologies. That was last week, and this is this week (I know, I know, profound, right? Feel free to make note of that little gem and use it as you see fit). With that, let’s get to this week’s installment of the TMIT!!! I am often asked, “What is one of the easiest but most effective thing that I can do in regard to my distillery insurance?” I have pondered this query for quite some time, and often, my answer changes. I could pontificate on-and-on about risk reduction, transfer of risk, blah, blah, blah. After really putting some thought into this, I wanted to come up with something that is super easy, yet incredibly effective. After wracking my super-brain with this topic and mulling over several different ideas, it finally came to me! I had an “ah-ha” moment. Actually, I cannot take full credit for this, I mean, I can and will since I did finally come up with it, but it was so simplistic that I just knew I had to share it. Recently, my own Super-Lair Insurance came due for renewal (otherwise known to mortals as “Home Owners Insurance”). Well, just like when the fire departments remind you to check the batteries in your smoke detectors (speaking of, when did you last do that at home? Well, you should, it could save lives and property, thank you firefighters!), I go through my Super-Lair at renewal time and take photos of all of my Super-stuff. AND IT HIT ME!!! In the case of a loss, especially a monumental loss, having photo evidence of all of your “stuff” can prove to be invaluable. At the time of loss, and in the days that follow, your world can be turned upside-down. The last thing your mind can handle is trying to recall each and everything in your location that may have been lost, especially when some claims adjustor is asking for a list of each item. Boy-howdy, would it be nice if you could produce images of EVERYTHING in your place??? Yes, yes it would. Well, do I have a solution that is the easiest thing in the world and could really save your proverbial bacon in the case of a loss. Everyone today has the ability to take photos or videos with great ease. It used to be that you would have to break out the boombox sized VHS video camera and struggle to get that beast up on your shoulder … risking back injury … or snap away with a camera that would cost you a fortune to develop the pictures you took. NOT ANYMORE!!!! Each of us carries around our cell phone at all times, each and every day. Well, whip that puppy out of your pocket, purse, European Man Clutch, or wherever you carry it, and start rolling or snapping away. You can simply walk though your facility and take photos of each room, a panoramic photo of the larger areas, or video that $H1t, all well narrating what you are seeing along with maybe a barrel count, or value of what you paid for the equipment. The cool thing is that this is backed up to the cloud, it is on your phone, and it can be sent off to someone in a few seconds and alleviates the hassle of trying to recall all of those items that you cannot recall in the face of a loss. As well, it is documented and date stamped, so the adjustor knows that it was done in advance, and it can be zoomed in on to see the details of each and every item. OH, WHAT A WONDERFUL TIME OF TECHNOLOGY IN WHICH WE LIVE!!!! Those old photos that were printed out, and those old videos could not be zoomed in on, and if they were it was so pixilated that you couldn’t tell if it was a bunch of bottles or a Daisy Duke poster from back in the day. The ability to literally walk though your facility and document everything that you have could be a lifesaver and could make sure that you recoup every dollar of coverage that you have paid for throughout the years. I will offer some quick tips on this process as well, since I have done this for many, many years. First off, go through the facility and open all the doors, drawers, containers, equipment, etc., before you start. It may look like a poltergeist just left the area, but it allows for a more flowless flow of documenting everything as you just take one pass thought the joint. As well, if there is a special area of interest, or something that may take a little more attention to detail, take the time to focus on that area and maybe even zoom in if there are a lot of detailed items that need to be shown. Lastly, take your time. This is not the Boston Marathon, people. Don’t run through and think you have to have this done in under a five-minute sprinters pace. Really take your time to make sure that you have gotten everything that you feel is important. If you own the building, start outside and get the building from all sides. If you are leasing, but you have done a bunch of improvements (tasting room area, gift shop, whatever), make sure you get the details of what you have done, and if you are videoing everything, narrate, narrate, narrate. “Here we have the Yeti-hewn logs that we brought in from the Himalayan Mountain Range that we used Yak sleds to transport … we spared no expense, but no Yeti’s or Yak’s were harmed in the process. Each expanse of log was $150,000 and there are 5 of them, so in logs alone we have $750,000 of value.” You get the idea. There you have it! The answer to the age old question of what is the easiest thing you can do in regard to your insurance coverage that will give you piece of mind and may just save you a lot of time in the long run as well as heartache. I have bestowed upon you, dear reader, the possible key to the insurance universe. You are welcome. With that, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! is off to assist yet another struggling distiller in distress. Until Next Time, Dear Reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@raoaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  8. GOOOOOOOOOD Morning ADI!!!!!!!!!! Where do I begin this TMIT?!?!?!?! I guess with a flashback - wavy - movie type - memory sequence. Que the music and fog machine ... Many, many years ago I had the privileged of attending my first ADI convention after being involved on the forums. Back in the day, being a rookie to the convention, it was overwhelming walking into the expo area and finding my booth. All of the delicious copper stills set up, bottle sales people with grandiose displays, all the different barrel char wheels and stave samples, and on and on it went. And that was back when the amount of vendors were only about 1/8th of what they are now. It was a grand convention and I was fortunate enough to take the expo by storm. I had something that no one else really had, and the line in front of my booth was as long as the lines to get on "Its a Small World" in Disney during Spring Break. Toward the end of the day I noticed a gentleman hanging back that had come by several times throughout the day. As I wrapped up a conversation it was his turn to come up to me. He introduced himself as Bill Owens, the president of ADI. He said that he had come by several times to see what all the interest was and we struck up an amazing conversation. Year after year at the conventions, Bill and I would always find time to visit, go for a few drinks, and even several dinners over the years. Bill would call me and ask for input on this or that, or tell me about his last road trip and where all he had been. It is truly something that I cherish and look back on fondly. Fast-forward several years up to about a year and a half or two years ago. I recall right where I was, and what I was doing (and if you have read past posts and replies, I have this weird photographic memory thing ... SUPERHERO, duh!!!!), when the phone rang. The voice on the other end started off by introducing himself as Erik Owens, Bill's son. From that moment and that conversation on, we became fast friends. Much like the relationship that Bill and I started, Erik and I picked up right up and ran with it. Just like with his wonderful father, Erik and I would catch up at conventions, chat away, grab drinks, and get dinners. Talk about a personable father and son combo, these guys are it. Erik and I would speak via phone, shoot texts back and forth, and work on always thinking of new ways to help improve the ADI family and offerings. Heck, we just talked last week about the potential of a very big idea that I will not divulge here, but Erik and I are working on something that could turn out to be very cool. Now that we are caught up to modern times and "today", it is with a very joyous and resounding "HUZZAH!!!" that I congratulate Erik as the new President of ADI!!!! Bill is undoubtedly an incredible asset to us all, has done so much to further the industry, is a fantastic person, and is till the life of the party. With that, I could think of no one else fit enough to take his place as El Presidente besides his son, Erik. Although I hate to see bill step down, I am so excited to see Erik step up into this roll and I can barely wait to see where he takes the industry and this organization. He is always thinking, creating new ideas, and is so knowledgeable, and I am not just blowing smoke here, folks. That is not Insuranceman 2.0!!!'s style. I say it like it is and if I like something, I say so, emphatically. If I don't like something, well I will either say so or I won't say nothin'! And I like this A LOT! Erik, congratulations on the new role. You have some seriously big shoes to fill, but I know you can do it and are up to the task. You know why???? Because I have already seen it, first hand. I would encourage all the ADI'ers out there to either shoot Erik an email, give him a call, or post something here to congratulate him. The future of ADI is exciting and I am glad that he is going to be at the helm. Until next time, dear readers ... Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  9. Happy Tuesday Morning to you, Dearest ADI Forum Go-ers!!!!!! In today's installment of the TMIT all I have to day is this. HAPPY NEW YEAR TO EVERYONE!!!!!!!!!! This has been an outstanding year, don't get me wrong. The FET extension, all of the new clients I have assisted, all of the past clients that I continued to enjoy yet again in 2019, and all of the amazing folks that I speak to everyday. I am fortunate, but I am Sooooooooo looking forward to 2020. I think it is going to be an amazing year, and the start of a fantastic new decade. So, enjoy your celebrations, be safe, and I look forward to seeing and hearing from all of you in the new year/decade. Until then ... the Waikiki surf is calling my name ... so back I go. Aloha, and until next time ... Stay Vigilant, Best, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  10. It is TRULY a happy Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit (on Thursday) kind of day!!!!!!!!!! Welcome dearest reader! Welcome to this installment of a historic and monumental TMIT. I, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! knowingly held off on writing this TMIT until today for a few reasons. Yes, yes, my superpowers know no bounds and I knew that I should hold off on this week’s installment until today. I had a sneaking suspicion (wink, wink, nod, nod) that the FET Extension would garner approval and be passed off to the POTUS prior to weeks end. Yes, there have been many grumblings and a lot of speculation and pontifications as to if the FET extension would be passed or not. Being all superhero-esque (actually I am not “LIKE” a superhero, I “AM” an insurance superhero!) and having connections on the inside and the outside, and all other sides that you can think of, I knew this was coming, and I could not be HAPPIER!!!!!!! Celebrate with a lowball, or even better yet, a highball, of your own handcrafted-spirit and enjoy this victory!!!!!!! Congratulations to all of you … my friends, and those of you I have yet to meet, just everyone!!!!!! I know it is only a year long extension, but it is an extension!!!!! This will allow for you, a year to keep taxes lower, a year of reprieve, but most importantly, a year to plan. Yes, a year to plan. I don’t want to darken the mood of this epic event, but I do encourage you to sit back and ponder what you have done with the last few years of this reprieve, and what you will do with the upcoming year. I implore you, do not squander this fantastic find of luck, who knows if it will last or not (fingers crossed it will)? One could only hope! Take stock of your good fortune and use this extension for good, not the other thing that I cannot speak of, as I am all good and knowing and it bitters my tongue. Use this year to save, invest, and do something for your operation that is not an ongoing cost. Equipment can be paid for and done. I am all about economic stimulus, but hiring people in positions with ongoing costs may not be the best place for your money to go. Enough said. Bottling lines, a bigger still, that piece of equipment you longingly look at on “Craigs List” every day … That is where you need to focus your efforts. Enough of me now pontificating, you know what you need and where to spend all that extra cash you have!!!!!! ENJOY that win, people!!!!! You deserve it, and well done. It would not have happened without you!!!! You all (and we all) fought our @$$3$ off to make this happen. So, take a moment, raise a glass, and toast this glorious moment! HIZZAH!!!!!!!! With that, on to the second point in the delay of my TMIT post. As you all know, we are drawing near to the end of the year, and quite honestly, the END OF A DECADE!!!!!! WHAT!??!!?!? Right!!!! That hit me like a ton of bricks. DUDE, seriously, we are just closing out a decade. SERIOUSLY … WHAT!??!?!?!?!? DAG!!!!!! 2020, y’all. Like, if I was an eye doctor, I would totally be owning this year in marketing with the whole 20/20 schtick, right?!?!?!?! Anyway, as you all know, we are closing out not only the end of the year, but the end of a decade, and InsuranceMan 2.0!!! is in search of a much-needed reprieve. So, the second point to the delay in my TMIT is to tell you that from the 20th of December until the 29th (and then it is all like New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day and stuff), I am leaving my super secluded high intensity fortress of solitude here in Sheridanopolis, and I am headed for the sandy beaches of Honolulu and Waikiki (see you soon Dave, I cannot wait!!!! I have to see some distillers whilst I am there, der! Part of the job and all!!!!) for some much-needed R&R. With that, I bid you all a found ado to 2019, and I am wonderfully excited to engage the upcoming 2020 decade of amazingness! A new decade of joy, prosperity (for all), and a decade of growth and opportunity. I wanted to take a moment to give all of you a heartfelt thank you for making this last year so amazing, and to really take in all of you, my dear readers. In this next year/decade, you, and totally you, have given me the opportunity to speak at the ADI conference in New Orleans (this is my third time), do several engagements with Moonshine University, and truly be grateful for my life, opportunities, and for the fact that I get to work with the best sect of people on the planet, and in the known Megaverse. THANK YOU!!!!!!! With that, I will implore you, DON’T EMAIL ME over the next week and a half, as I will not respond. I will be surfing, diving with sharks, and otherwise “preoccupied”! But, I will say, totes HMU after the first of the year, because I will rock your insurance experience and save you an @$$ ton of premium dollars all whilst increasing your coverage and making sure you are taken care of in a way that you have never known before!!! THANK YOU FOR AN AMAZING 2019!!!!!!!! HERE IS TO AN EVEN MORE AMAZING 2020 AND A NEW DECADE!!!!! Until next time, dear reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsurnaceMan 2.0 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com Or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com HAPPY HOLIDAY / HAPPY NEW YEARS!!!!!
  11. Happy Tuesday Morning Everyone, Ah yes, Tuesday! One of our most favorite days. Not because it is only two measly days into slugging through the week, but because it means it is time for the TMIT!!!!!!!!!!! <Sounds of throngs of adoring fans cheering and chanting TMIT … TMIT … TMIT …> Thank you … Thank you … You are too kind!!!!!! On to it then! Today I am touching on something that we have not spoken about before, but like a loud bang in the night, it awoken me in the midst of the night with me thinking to myself, “Self …” I thought to myself, “Why have we not talked about this before?” So, it is high time to rectify this and we are going to talk about it now. In the past we have discussed the finer points of “Replacement Cost” and what that means, as well as “Co-Insurance” and how that works. This topic folds in with each of those items, but is a bit more nuanced discussion on “replacement cost” in regard to buildings. Now, although this will apply to buildings that you have remodeled or rehabbed, it also very much applies to newly constructed properties and for the purpose of this conversation we will use the example of a newly constructed distillery. Let’s say that you recently just built your dream distillery and OH, IT IS SCHWANK!!!!! Everything you ever wanted. All the bells and whistles, knobs and dials, walls of glass to showcase your killer 32’ column shiny copper still from the 320 seat tasting room … the whole 9 yards baby!!!!! WOOHOO!!!! Congratulations. Now it is time to get this puppy insured. You call some Joe Schmuckatelli insurance guy down the way and tell him, “Hey buddy, you should see this place, it is amazing.” And you tell him all about your killer distillery. Then it happens. The worst possible question he could ask. “What did it cost you to build it?” Your eyes glaze over and numbers start flying through your head and you see cartoon money with wings flying away and giant bags tied at the top with a string with “$” signs printed on them rolling out your doors on a conveyer belt and you start thinking that you better start making a lot of hooch, and QUICK. After you moment of tallying your investment you tell Mr. Schmuckatelli that you are into this baby about $2.2 Million ( I know, that is a lot for a start up, but it is my story and I will tell it how I want. I will tell you, I have had people that “started up” with a $14.6 million cost before. Yikes. ) Then the next worst thing is said by this insurance schlepper. “OK, that is the value we will use to insure your building then.” You think, “Sure, why not, that is what it cost me to build this beautiful homage to hooch. Let’s do it!” And he does it, and you overpay through the nose and lose out on tons of money that you could have used to by barrels, or whatever you need next. Why are you paying through the nose you may wonder? Well, I will tell you. Remember a few short moments ago when you were off in la-la-land and thinking about all the money flying away? When you were watching all of that money flying away, which it was, you were also adding up and tallying costs that you most likely do not need to insure. Let me give you an example. How much dirt-work and prep work did your site take? I would imagine that out of $2.2 million, at the very least, $150,000 was in site prep and dirt work. How about the flat work, concrete, etc.? Another $250,00 or so? Oh, and the hook ups, good-night the hook ups!!!! Brining water and sewer in and all your underground piping, tap fees, architect costs with stamping fees, on and on and on it goes. EXACTLY!!!!!!!! Almost all of those costs are things that you factored into you “REPLACMENT COST” because that was real money that left your hands and was spent, so that is what you tallied and told the cruddy agent who is wanting to insure your building for ALL OF THAT COST when in reality quite a percentage of your “build costs” would not need to be redone in the case of a loss. Concrete does not burn, site work and leveling don’t need to be redone in the case of a fire, and generally underground pipes don’t burn and you will always have your plans and the tap fees are a one time deal. See where I am going here?!?!?!? You may have had costs in excess of maybe 25% or more of the actual value of your building that would not need to be redone at a later date in the case of a loss. However, because you didn’t think about it in this way, and this snake-oil salesman didn’t bother to ask or care (really, most of them don’t even know and the more they insure it for the more it costs and the more they make), and now you are paying premium on a $2.2 million dollar value when you probably could have insured it for a “replacement cost” of $1.5 – $1.65 million, which would save you A BUNCH of money annually. Not to mention, you would be spending money on something that you will never realize in the case of a claim, because the carrier will pay to “replace” the building with like kind and quality and if that can be done for $1.2 million, then that is what it will cost the insurance carrier, and as long as it is exactly like it was, who cares?!?!?! YOU DO!!!!! You were paying premium on way more than that, because you cruddy “evil-doer” agent was over charging you and didn’t care! Do not be that person that doesn’t know, who calls an insurance person who doesn’t know, and who is going to value something someway because you said that is what it cost you, that you are going to overpay on for years and years and years. Nope! You are better and smarter than that. You are the type of intelligent insurance purchaser who has read all the TMIT’s and you are armed with knowledge, or at least the fact that you should contact me, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! and allow me to work through these things with you and direct you and assist you in getting the correct coverage at the right amount for the right premium. Voilà !!!!! This is why I am an insurance superhero by day, and …… Well …. I am an insurance superhero 24/7/365, so …. With that my dearest readers, I am off to battle yet more insurance issues for some clients that came from a bad situation but are on their way to being much better and saving lots ‘o dollars now that they contacted me. Until next time dear readers, Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yaho.com
  12. Members 3 77 posts Report post Posted 3 minutes ago I know it is a bit late one the day, but I have been out celebrating!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Happy repeal day, everyone!!!!!!!!!! This is why you and I are in business together!!!!!!!! The repeal of the 18th amendment to the constitution, the only amendment to ever be repealed!!!!!!!!!!!!! 86 years ago on this day, the amendment to repeal liquor ordinance went away!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THANK GOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Happy REPEAL DAY everyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  13. It is Tuesday, that means it is time for the Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit!!!!!!!!!! My goodness! Where to start???!!!?! Well, as the title eludes to, I had some really well thought out and great plans in store and I was sooooo, soooo excited to execute them. I was going to put up a teaser on Tuesday last week and then hit you all with a great post on Thursday for Thanksgiving. I wanted to tell you all that I am so thankful for all of you, for being allowed to be InsuranceMan 2.0!!! for the last 9, now almost 10 years, how I am thankful for what I do and for all of the support of ADI and the community here. That is why I put those things now, because they are true and I am so very thankful and have a lot to be thankful for. My wonderful plans fell by the wayside however ... With that, I have to tell you that I am SUPER thankful to just have made it to see some family and back during "SNOWmagedon". Wowza! I have done battle with some serious evildoers in years past, but Mother Nature can be one of the evilest evildoers of all. She can be unrelenting, and just when you think you have her beat, she decides to really show you what she can do, and then you all but beg for mercy. I missed my post last Tuesday because we wanted to go see family and I figured we would leave early enough that I would write to all of my dear readers latter that day setting up the Thursday "Thanksgiving" post. I was wrong. What should have been a 7 hour drive ended up being like a 17 hour drive and by the time we got in I was to tired and nerve-wracked to type or see. I needed a Martini and bed, stat!!!!! The next day was not as crazy, but it was a bit stressful spending time on phone calls and relaying road reports to others and catching up with family and making sure everyone one in other places were ok as well. Then the big Thanksgiving day came and it was wild and crazy as well. People all over, which is what it is about, phone calls to those that could not be with us, and of course a lot of food and drink, which was glorious. In all of the fun and frivolity however, and the decompression of the prior days stress, my post did not get written and for that, I apologize. Then of course the next day and the next were full of family fun and catching up with old friends, etc. Then it was time to head home. Dunt-dunt-DAAAA!!!! "The roads are open", they said. "It should be fine", they told us. "I don't think the hard stuff is gonna come down for a while" (nod if you get that reference), we heard. Yup, the roads were open, but that does not mean they should be. That 7 hour drive that took 17 the first go-around took more like 2 1/2 days going back. Thank God I am InuranceMan 2.0!!! and I have nerves of steel and super vision. I have never been in ground blizzards, ice packed roads, and 60+ mile an hour winds like that in my life. A stretch of highway ... HIGHWAY was at a dead standstill with traffic in both directions for 30-40 miles. When it would move, it was slow, but that did not keep people from sliding off into the ditches or trucks from BLOWING OVER!!!! If you have not seen that, it is something to behold!!!!!!! And we are talking about a highway that runs in the middle of FREAKING NOWHERE where there are not towns every 5 miles. More like every 50-100 miles. Well, suffice to say, after getting through the nightmareish hell that Mother Nature threw at us, we were snowed in to a decent sized town for a day or so, and finally crept our way back to Sheridanopolis a few days late, and that is why I am just writing this to you all now. I am thankful for many things, all of you here being one of them. I am thankful for a good life, good family, good friends, good drinks, and to be home safe and sound. I am not thankful for wicked winter storms. I am hopeful that all of you had a great Thanksgiving, stayed safe, and are home and happy. I am not thankful for my best laid plans going out the window, but life is full of wrenches that get thrown in our cogs, and being able to ebb and flow is what we have to do, on a daily basis. So, no real insurance related items here today, but I will get something in here for you to make it all worth it that is insurance related so you get something out of reading all of this. I saw a great saying the other day that went like this, "If you only have liability on your vehicle, stay home. This is a FULL COVERAGE kind of driving day." Yes they were! Until Next Time ... Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  14. Happy Tuesday to all of you, my dearest readers, As you may have noticed, we have gone a couple of weeks without the weekly installment of the TMIT, and for that I apologize. As it turns out, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! was otherwise occupied fighting many facets of E V I L !!!!! From some family illness, to working on several very important top secrete projects (hopefully to be announced first here in the future), I have had to take a bit of a reprieve and structure some things differently for a time. Alas, I am back, and with a VENGEANCE (insert cool sound effect here)!!!!!!!!! For this installment of the TMIT I am going to address a topic that is at the top of everyone’s mind as we move closer to the end of the year … TO BOND, OR NOT TO BOND? That is the question—Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous potential Federal Excise Taxes, Or to take arms against a sea of taxation, And, by opposing, keep them low? What in the heck am I talking about? Well, as seen from my stolen and slightly modified Shakespeare quote, I am going to address the impending Federal Excise Tax Rate cut that many have enjoyed for the past many years. As most of you know, or should know, on December 22nd of 2017 a bill was passed that reduced the Federal Excise Tax rate on distilled spirits (amongst many other things) for the years of 2018 and 2019. The taxation rate was reduced from $13.50 per proof gallon down to $2.70 for the same, thereby leaving a lot of extra money in many a distillers pocket/businesses. Oh how we rejoiced and made merry at this news!!!!! Not only was the tax burden lessened upon the good and hearty distillery folk of this land, but they also passed a provision stating that if a distillery removed less than $50,000 worth of taxable product (which works out to roughly 18,518 proof gallons of product at 100 proof, or 23,148 gallons at 80 proof … which is A LOT of booze) in a years’ time, you were no longer were required to carry a Federal Distiller Spirits Plant (or DSP) Bond. Again, the “huzzah’s” rang throughout the land!!!!!! Many distilleries took these newly found riches and either upgraded their equipment, hired much needed assistance, put it into marketing, or simply enjoyed having some extra “walkin’ around” money. Whatever the case, it was a windfall in many cases and one that was enjoyed and well deserved. Fast forward from that time of celebration to now. We are late into 2019 and within a month and a half of this amazing bill, H.R.1 — 115th Congress (2017-2018), expiring. Yup! EXPIRING!!!!!! This bill was only good for 2018 and 2019 and has an expiration date of December 31st of 2019 unless action is taken by those duly elected national officials to either implement this change permanently or allow for it to expire. At this point in time, this bill has a lot of positive backing with several high-powered officials signing on to make this tax cut permanent, however … things like “impeachment hearings” and other political nonsense can get in the way of actual legislation taking place, and we are quickly running out of time before the House and Senate adjourn for Thanksgiving and then the long break over Christmas and New Year’s. PEOPLE, THERE REALLY IS NOT MUCH TIME LEFT HERE!!!!!!!!! This is one of the things that I, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! have been working on. So, what can you do???? Contact your representatives. How do you do that???? Go here: https://whoismyrepresentative.com/ to find out who you can send a letter to, AND SEND IT!!!!!!!!! OK, you have the background now, and the knowledge to go forward to make a difference, but how does this all tie in with the whole, “To bond or not to bond” question? Well, for those of you who are up and running and loving the reduced rate, that is great. For those that are just finalizing their paperwork in order to get their licensing and permitting, now is a precarious time due to the fact that they do not know if they need to submit a bond or not in order to have everything pass thought smoothly. Will the FET cut be made permanent? Will not submitting a bond screw things up and lengthen the process? Will a bond be needed or not come 2020?!?!?!?!? WHO KNOWS!!!!!!!!! So, the question becomes, to bond or not to bond at this point in time. The answer … I don’t have the answer. Here is the sage advice of the all-knowing and all-wise InsuranceMan 2.0!!!, DSP bonds for the past “minimum” required Federal bond stipulated that you must carrier at least $15,000 worth of “Operations” and $1,000” in withdrawal. That bond usually ran about $192 for the year. If you are new to the game and you want to make sure that you are not going to get caught up in sticky red-tape on your permitting, I would say get a bond if you are not a risk taker. The other side of that is, if you are submitting via the PONL system prior to the very end of 2019, take the risk and submit it without a bond since you are still technically under the deadline of the FET cut and you “should” be fine. The crappy part about this is, no one really knows what is going to happen and there is not much out there that addresses if this will get passed in time or not. So that leaves all of us sitting and waiting to find out what the future holds and if the tax rates will remain the same or be jacked up to the prior rates of years past. All I can tell you is this, get a hold of your representative and try to make a difference. Otherwise, if you just sit on your laurels and hope others will contact their public officials, you may end up having to contact me instead in order to purchase a Federal DSP bond!!!!!!! Which call would you rather make, one that will save you money, or one that will cost you money????? You decide. I am hopeful that this tax cut remains intact the way it sits at the $2.70 rate per proof gallon and I don’t have to write a single DSP bond this year. If it does expire however, take a number and get in line because InsuranceMan 2.0!!! is going to be one busy sonuvabeach, cranking out bonds across this nation. Trust me, I would rather see you keep that money in your pocket than to put some into mine and a whole lot into the pockets of the surety companies. Make your calls, send your emails, and tell them to keep the rates low. Hopefully in one month and 16 days we can all raise a glass and toast the permanent tax cuts and have yet another amazing reason to welcome in the new year! Until next time … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  15. Happy Anniversary and Good Tuesday Morning Dearest ADI’ers, Today marks the one-year anniversary of my return to the forums and my transformation from InsuranceMan to the new and improved InsuranceMan 2.0!!! that you have all come to love and adore. There will be cake at the end of this post in recognition of this day, so stick around. Well, as you have probably noticed, it is actually Wednesday, and no, I have not used my superpowers to reverse the rotation of the earth, go back in time and write this post for you. Although I am indeed an insurance superhero, I am not completely infallible and I have succumbed to some sort of superbug and have been a bit under the weather lately. Alas, it will not keep me from performing my super-duties so I present to you the latest installment of the TMIT! Today we are going to touch upon a topic that really will only pertain to about 17 states in this great country, but it should be worth the read for all of you. I will even make it pertain to several more of you in the end, since the overarching topic does affect many in the marketplace. So, what am I talking about?!?!?! None other than the notorious “ABC” states. Not to be confused with the “Notorious B.I.G.” That is something TOTALLY different. Anyway, if you are not in one of these states you have probably at least heard of them. An “ABC” state is an “Alcoholic Beverage Control” state. Clever, eh? Alcoholic Beverage Control = ABC. Somebody was really thinkin’ when they came up with that one! ABC states really developed out of a long and sorted history having to do with pre-prohibition laws, prohibition, and the repeal of national prohibition on December 5th of 1933. A day we should all celebrate, by the way! Under the ratification, the Twenty-first Amendment (which by the way is still the only amendment to the constitution that repealed a prior amendment. Use that in your tasting room trivia games. You’re Welcome!) control was given to the states over the sale, manufacturing, distribution, or continued prohibition of alcohol. OK, enough history lesson, but I thought you should know if you didn’t already. Here is a map off all of the ABC states, just in case you were wondering. “OK, great, InsuranceMan 2.0!!!, but what in the word does any of this have to do with insurance?!?!??!” I am glad you asked. Each ABC has its own set of rules that they operate under but the “gist” of the rules go something like this … A monopolistic system is set up whereby a manufacturer of Alcoholic Spirits is prohibited from direct distribution of said beverages. Alcoholic products must be shipped to state run facilities and distributed from said facility to state run or privately licensed retail operations. So again, what does this have to do with insurance? EVERYTING!!!!!! You make your product, and then you are required by law to ship your product to a state-run facility, either a “bailment” situation, or some other state-run facility where it will wait to go out for distribution. Well, what happens to that product if it is damaged while in the “Care / Custody / or Control” (a.k.a. CCC) of the state-run facility? Who covers the loss to your precious product? The answer is … it depends. Don’t you just love that answer? So vague, so mysterious. Well friends, I DO NOT LOVE THAT ANSWER and that is why I am here and writing this for you today. So, how do you know if you are supposed to insure your product, or if the state is supposed to insure it, or is it insured if it is off your premise? It all boils down to “contractual obligation”. What does your contract say? Do you know? Do you have a contract? Most of you that reside in an ABC state do or should have a contractual document outlining what the rules are, shipments, and insurance provisions. Go to the contract and find out. What you find may surprise you. Most of you may find that you are still technically liable for any damage that occurs to your product while in the CCC of the state-run facility. “How can that be?”, you may ask. “It is not in my control, and if some dufus hits it with a forklift, how is that my problem????” Again, look at the contract. In many instances not only are you still responsible to insure your product while in the CCC of the state, but you may also have waived you rights of subrogation to the state as well as a “hold harmless” agreement. Basically, what this means is that the insurability of your product is your responsibility even if some dufus ruins it without you being party to it. Seems pretty stupid, doesn’t it? Well, it may be exactly the situation you are in. If your insurance carrier is not aware of this situation, you may not have coverage. THAT IS WHAT ALL THIS HAS TO DO WITH INSURANCE!!!!! You may be paying a premium for a policy that is not going to cover the largest stock exposure that you have. That is no bueno for sure. If you are in an ABC state and you are not familiar with what your insurance obligations are then your agent and carrier probably have no idea either. That can leave you in an insurance-wasteland and that is not where you want to find yourself, EVER! There are ways to insure your product while offsite and in the CCC of others, but you need to know that you need to have that type of coverage and report it to the agent … Or, you could turn to an expert in the industry and I … I mean “they”, should know to ask these hard-hitting questions. If you reside in one of these states and you have not had this conversation, well, my number is listed below. You better call me. I had said that I will make this relatable for more folks than just the “ABCer’s” out there and we have come to that point, so here you go. Maybe you are a contract distiller/bottler for someone else, or maybe you have an arrangement for offsite storage at someone else’s facility. Trust me, I have seen a lot of different setups over all my years of doing this. If so, who is responsible for what, where, and when? If you contract out to someone else, is it their responsibility to insure their branded product while at your facility, or is it yours? Again, what does the contract say? You are a “Contract” distillery/bottler after all … WHAT?!?!!? There is no formal contract?!?!?!!?!! My super-nerves are sensing a HUGE potential issue. If this is not spelled out in writing there could be some serious ramifications if a loss were to occur. Furthermore, without a formal written contract it may be impossible for one or either of you to procure insurance on this product. Or even possibly worse, you (the contract distiller/bottler) may have to increase your insurance to protect someone else’s product thereby driving up your cost that you either have to “out-of-pocket”, or pass it on to the people you are contracted with which drives down their profits. Either way it is an insurability nightmare if you do not have a formal written contract between you and the other party. Whether it is a contract distiller situation, bottler, or with the state. You HAVE TO KNOW what is in the contract and who’s responsibility the insurance is. If there is no contract, then it DEPENDS, and you know how much I love that!!!!! I highly suggest that if you are in one of these states, or in a situation where someone else has CCC of your product, or if you have the CCC of someone else’s product, you get in touch with me, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! so that we can hash out the details and make sure that if the day comes where the unforeseen is seen, we know that you will be made whole again in the way you are supposed to. With that my friends, as promised, here is your anniversary cake in honor of the one-year mark of me being back on the forums. ENJOY!!!! and until next time dear reader, Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  16. Happy Tuesday My Friends, In today’s installment of the TMIT I want to talk about what it means when an insurance speaking person mentions the term “Hard Market.” As with most things, insurance operates on cycles. Most things in the world are cyclical, and insurance is no different. Often times there are many good years in the insurance industry where businesses flourish, the economy is good, and losses are low. Years without natural disasters assist in this arena very much as well. These times are known as “soft markets”. Insurance companies write a lot of business and the premiums are lower than normal because everything is ice-cream cones, rainbows and unicorns. But then it happens … Dun-Dun-DAH!!!! Maybe natural disasters happen, one after another. Big losses occur, or perhaps smaller but multiple losses occur within a sect or several sects of business (think Jim Beam fires, Rickhouse collapses, etc.), and the market turns! Keep in mind, there are two types of “hard markets”. The first is one that we have all been through if you have been around 5 to 6 years, since that seems to be the natural cycle of the insurance marketplace. The first “hard market” type is the one where, with out any changes to your policy, your premium all of the sudden increases 10%-25% at renewal. You are thinking, “What the H311 just happened?!?!?!?! I didn’t change anything!?!??!?!” You are correct, you may not have changed anything. So, what did change? Well, here is an InsuranceMan 2.0!!! basic insurance lesson. Insurance is the spread of risk among many to pay the losses of a few which thereby allows the carriers to charge smaller premiums to many individuals to offset the losses of those few. Well, in a year, or more accurately, in a succession of years where the losses are more severe, the insurance companies reassess the amount of premium being charged to offset said losses so that a “combined loss ratio” number is achieved. I am not going to go into the intricacies of what a combined loss ratio is at this point in time. Suffice to say, if you are ever having trouble sleeping, give me a call and I will use my superpowers of hypnosis to put you right out by explaining this to you. For now, let’s just say that insurance companies, like casinos, don’t build big amazing buildings with all of the losses they sustain. Capeesh? It is the second type of “hard market” that I am most interested in telling you about here. It is not the kind of hard market that jacks premiums overnight, instead it is the kind that I have spoken about in a few other postings here on the forums. In a way, it is a much more insidious type of hardening of the insurance market. The kind where premiums don’t necessarily go up, rather, the underwriting guidelines change, become more stringent, and it is just harder to get a carrier to provide coverage that isn’t for some “main street mom & pop nothing shop”. Distilleries have never technically been an “easy sell” for an agent to approach a carrier with. Trust me, I know! I was the first guy ever to develop an insurance program for distilleries and it took years and years of getting doors slammed in my super-face. Anyway, distilleries have always been a “high risk” in the world of insurance, which is so stupid! I don’t want to get off on a tangent here for the next hundred lines of text, but you all know what you are doing, you are highly regulated (by many governmental agencies, both local and nationally, as well as you highly regulate yourselves. This is your livelihood and your soul, you never want to see anything bad happen.), and you are all very safe. So, this is just a stupid concept that I have fought to prove for dang near the last decade. Hey, I am here for you and on your side. See?!?!??!! Here I GO!!!!!! OK, back to the topic at hand. Distilleries have never been an easy sell, we got that. However, they had been easier in the past than they are becoming now. What do I mean? Just what I mentioned above. We are entering into a hard market cycle where it is becoming more difficult to place distillery clients with “Standard” carriers. If you don’t now what that is, go find my post on “Standard vs. E&S” … Oh, just let me do it for you, here! The long and short of it all is this, we are certainly trending toward a hardening market whereby it is becoming a much harder sell for most agents to get standard carriers to look at good distillery clients. However, if a GOOD insurance agent can get a GOOD distillery client in front of a GOOD insurance carrier, and they know what they are doing, BAM! They will still write the account which means less in the way of premium and more in the way of coverage. If you want to know what you need to do to be considered a GOOD distillery that can be written with a GOOD insurance carrier, then you should be contacting a GREAT insurance superhero. Let’s see, who comes to mind?!?!?! Hummmm ….. This is a tough one! NO IT IS NOT!!!!!!!! IT IS ME!!!!!!!!! InsuranceMan 2.0!!! I can walk you through what you need to do to better your chances, increase your coverage, and lower your premiums. I love to do what I do, I love to get great distilleries placed with great insurance companies that provide great coverage with great premiums. It is all just “GREAT”!!!!!!!! Want to be “GREAT”? Great!!! Let’s all be great together. Call me, email me, text me, PM me here, shoot the InsuranceMan 2.0!!! beacon against the clouds from your distillery … whatever it takes, but get in touch with me. Until next time dear readers … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  17. Happy Tuesday Morning Dear ADI Forum Readers, Today in the TMIT we are going to turn our attention to something that many of us don’t want to necessarily discuss or talk about. With the days getting shorter, and many of you located in those cold and snowy areas (see, we don’t want to talk about this, right?!?!), something that needs to be at the top of your mind is the fact that as temperatures dip into that “below freezing” area, pipes can and do freeze. Now, I don’t want to get into some type of physics lesson here, but we are all aware of what happens when water freezes, right?!?!? Yeapers, it expands. If a pipe is full of water, which distilleries have a boatload of, and it expands with nowhere else to go, pressure builds, and “BLAM”!!!! Burst pipe, water everywhere, damage, soggy stuff, fried electrical, and big trouble! So, the question that arises is, are you covered for this type of a claim? Do you know? Do you care? Well, you better know and you better care because I have seen this type of loss many times over, and water damage can be COSTLY!!!!! So, do you know if you have coverage? If you are a normal insurance purchaser, you rely on the agent to get you what you need and leave it at that. You know what, if you are working with an expert who is a professional in the industry, then that may be OK. If you are working with someone that is a “generalist” and you told them to just get you what they think you need, you could have issues. There are several different types of property coverage forms associated with insurance policies, and if you do not have the right coverage form it could cost you big dollars. WAY BIGGER than the small premium charge that could have made all of the difference. The three common property coverage forms are Basic, Broad, and Special. Under the basic form this type of a loss IS NOT covered, so you may want to go dig that policy up and take a look at it to see what you have. Under the Broad and Special forms, the coverage of frozen pipes is covered … with certain parameters that we will get into in a second. The big question is though, why would an agent only provide you with Basic coverage forms? Well, honestly, they shouldn’t. If they are any type of professional, they will know the difference and should know enough about your operation that this should not happen. Once in a great while though, and if they have no idea what they should do for a distillery, they may end up working with an Excess & Surplus lines carrier that only can offer Basic property coverage. Or it may be due to the age of the building or a myriad of other factors. Point being, you better know, and if you don’t know your coverage form, you better ask. OK, now on to the Broad and Special forms. Again, I have not seen a Broad forms policy for quite some time as there really is no reason to utilize this form unless the carrier specifies that they cannot provide anything better. If that is the case, then the agent should be looking for other alternative options. The cost differential between Broad and Special is dang near nothing, so there is no reason to shoot for the stars here folks. The Special property coverage form in insurance-ese is CP 10 30 04 02 (in most cases, it could be CP 10 30 06 95 so check for either) and in a nutshell, Special form covers EVERY TYPE OF LOSS unless it is specifically excluded (see your coverage form – Causes of Loss – Special form – A. Covered Causes of loss, subsection B – Exclusions, Item #2, subsection g. water. I did this purposefully to get you to pull out the policy and look at it. Clever, no????). This is the best coverage that carriers can provide, and this is the coverage that you need to have. This type of coverage has inaccurately been call “ALL PERIL” coverage, but that really is not true, as there are some specific exclusions that are always excluded by insurance policies. That is not to say you cannot obtain coverage for things such as Earthquake, Mudslide, Hurricane, Terrorism, etc., it just means that you must purchase a separate and specific policy to cover those things. So as you can see, it is not truly an “All Peril” coverage form, it is Special … Isn’t everyone?!???! So, let’s get to the exclusionary language as it pertains to frozen pipes and water damage. Again, under the Special Form CP 10 30, freezing of pipes is covered … provided a few things have happened. The loss must be “sudden and accidental”, meaning that it cannot have been due to corroding pipes or other issues that could have been prevented earlier on. As well, you must certify that in the case of a frozen pipe with resulting water damage that you have done what is needed to maintain adequate heat to prevent freezing, or in the case that you are closed for whatever reason for a period of time, that heat was maintained or the system was completely drained of all water. If those things have been done, and you report the loss in a “timely manner”, you will have coverage. “Timely Manner” is an interesting term in insurance. For a bunch of lawyers who like to define tons of words in policies (there is a whole definitions section for crying out loud), they never define what “timely” means. I will tell you this, I define it as sooner than later for sure! Not to mention that water damage is only part of a burst pipe claim. Did you know that water damage, especially when absorbed by wood, sheetrock, etc., can start producing mold within 24-48 hours????? Dang, that stuff is prolific, isn’t it??!?!?! Mix that with heat and moisture (which distilleries have quite a bit of), and that process can happen even faster. “Well then, all knowing InsuranceMan 2.0!!!, what should I do in the case of a broken pipe and water damage claim?” I am glad you asked, devoted reader. In the case of a broken pipe that is spilling water everywhere, first and foremost, shut off the water, duh. Then, do what you can to mitigate any of the damage. Mop it up, push it into a floor drain, suck it up with a shop vac, whatever you can do to get a majority of the water out of your facility. Then, FANS!!!!!!!!! Lots of fans. Being that the water damage came from a frozen pipe, I would not suggest throwing the doors open to get a cross breeze in your facility, it may just turn the whole place into an ice rink. But in the case of a sudden and accidental burst pipe in warmer areas or at other times of the year, go ahead and throw those doors wide open. The point is to start the drying process as quickly as possible to avoid any mold growth. Speaking of, guess what, mold is EXCLUDED under every policy, including Special form, so mold = no Bueno. Once that process is underway, and you are looking at all of the damage the water has caused, pick up the phone and call your agent to tell them what happened. I would consider that “timely” even if it is hours or a day or two later, since it can be an arduous process to get that water out of there. When you contact your agent (which by the way, if it is not me, SERIOUSLY?!??! What are you thinking at this point, obviously I know what I am doing and I have provided you with all this great information. If you are not using me by now, I don’t even know what to say.) and report the claim. They will get it to the company and an insurance adjustor will contact you, usually within 24 hours to come out and take a look. Start inventorying the damage that you want them to take a look at so that you can make sure they see all the things you want them to see. Then, voila, the claim should be paid and you can recoup the money/value you have into the process and recover your loss. Well dearest reader, that concludes today's fun insurance lesson on frozen and burst pipes. If you have any questions about this type of loss situation or any other insurance questions what-so-ever, feel free to give me a call at any time. I can be reached on the RED emergency InsuranceMan 2.0!!! phone at any time, day or night at 307-752-5961. Until next time dear reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insurancman2.0@yahoo.com
  18. Good Morning My Friends, In today's installment of the TMIT there is only one thing that I want to say. Let us never forget the real, everyday heroes that gave their lives on this day eighteen years ago, and those who have given their lives over the last almost two decades due to illnesses sustained from the terrorist attack on 9/11. Every day, first responders, fire fighters, police, military service people and others provide us with protection, put their lives on the line, and serve us so that we can live in freedom and know that we are safe. If you see someone in uniform today, please take a minute to thank them for what they do. It is often a thankless job, but we ALL depend on them, every hour of every day. Until Next Time .... Stay Vigilant, and NEVER FORGET, Aaron Linden a.k.a InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  19. Tuesday is upon us once again, dearest ADI-ers, so here we go. In today's installment of the TMIT I am actually going to ask a short and sweet question and I am hoping for several responses from the forum goers. I am wondering to myself, "Self ...", I wonder ... "How many distillers out there would like to have a health insurance alternative?" So, what I am asking is the following, how many distilleries out there would be interested in some sort of health insurance plan? It could be an individual group type policy, but more what I am wondering is would there be interest in a larger group policy for distillers guilds, etc.? Let me know if this is something of interest to anyone out there and if so, where you are located and what your thoughts or questions are. I am doing some exploratory research on my end, but I want to know if anyone else out there has thought about this and I am wanting to get a feel for the potential need of such an offering. I look forward to hearing from you. Until next time my friends .... Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 aaron@roaringforkins.com or insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  20. It’s Tuesday, It’s Tuesday, Woo, Woo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Good morning my friends in ADI-land! Do you ever have those days where you wake up and do your superhero work out (usually consisting of the dog running me, not the other way around), your weight training routine, and then have some wonderfully flavorful French press coffee and a luxurious breakfast and you just feel like the word is your oyster?!???!?! Well, if you have had those mornings then you know how I am feeling. All is right in Insuranceopolis and I am just in a hap-hap-happy mood. I hope this post finds you feeling the same. In today’s installment of the TMIT I want to touch on a topic that we have never really spoke about here previously. This is something that may concern some of you, and for others it may not be a big deal at all, it just depends on your operation. Although insurance has a long history and is a concept almost as old as dirt, this coverage is one that actually did not even exist just a few decades ago. What am I talking about???? Any guesses???? CYBER LIABILITY!!!!!!!!! Yes, siree Bob. Cyber Liability actually came into existence well after the advent of computer technology, email, and quite honestly, a rather long time after the wide accessibility of the internet and shopping online. As we have discussed previously, insurance is antiquated in many senses and big ships turn slow. Although there was a need for this type of coverage prior to it being offered, this “late to the game” approach by the insurance industry is quite typical. Often times this approach is born out of bureaucracy and red-tape, but more-often-than-not it is simply due to the fact that no one really knows what the true exposures are or how to underwrite or provide coverage for such a new threat. We have been dealing with fires and lawsuits since the beginning of time so those are easily dealt with by insurance carriers. There are specialized underwriting matrix that exist regarding property loss and liability that are backed by over a hundred years’ worth of data. But cyber … well that is something that simply did not exist previous to 1988. Why 1988 you may ask? Well, according to NATO International, the first documented attack on the cyber infrastructure occurred in 1988 and was called the Morris Worm. This was a rather simplistic attack that took advantage of a weakness in the Unix system Noun 1 and slowed computes down, ultimately making them cease completely. Oh, how far and much more nefarious have attacks progressed from then to now!!!!!!!! Realistically, cyber liability coverage can trace it’s roots back to somewhere in the 1990’s, but back then, as is mostly the case through today, no one really understood the need for this coverage and very few purchased it. It was not until around the year 2000 that Lloyd’s of London launched the first Cyber Liability policy. Fast-forward to 2019 and you may think that the percentage of companies that purchase this coverage would be HUGE due to the increase of cyber attacks. Well dear reader, you would be very, very wrong. Less than one-third (1/3) of all US based companies carry any type of Cyber Liability coverage. SERIOUSLY!?!??!! Everyone gets attacked at some point, right?!?!?!?! Well … according to statista.com, not everyone is attacked. In 2018 the annual number of data breaches was upwards of about 1,300 in the U.S. Although that may not seem like as many as one would think, please keep in mind that the AVERAGE COST of a cyber breach at that time was $27,370,000! Yes, that is twenty-seven MILLION DOLLARS!!!!!!!!!!! Now, obviously we are talking about some big-time companies here, hospitals, credit card companies, etc. With that said though, smaller businesses get hit all the time and everything is relative, right??!?! If a big corporation has a cyber liability loss of $27,000,000 it still is going to hurt their bottom line at the end of the year, just like if your business has a loss of maybe $270,000 it is going to hurt your bottom line, maybe even to the point of putting you out of business where as the “Big Boys” can absorb such a loss a bit easier and continue to operate. Ok, enough of the history lesson, although it was needed in order to set the table so that we can discuss this topic further. So, what does Cyber Liability cover? Well, that depends on the type of business, the size, what kind of records you keep, and quite honestly it depends on the carrier that you purchase the coverage though as they are all different. In a nutshell, Cyber provides coverage for financial losses that result from data breaches or other cyber type attacks. As stated, different carriers offer different policies, but most do cover not only first-party (you and your business) coverage, but third-party coverage as well. That means that a cyber policy can provide insurance for losses that you sustain due to a cyber attack that ruin your personal data records as well as anyone that is damaged due to your data being breached. How about an example, eh? You sell your product to John Smithe (pronounced “smYthe” 😊 , either on site at your location or via an internet sale, if that is legal where you are located), and you retain Mr. Smithe’s information in your database. Maybe you have his name (duh!), address, phone number, etc. … but here is where it gets scary … maybe you have also retained his date of birth for legal verification reasons, as well as his credit card number and other vital purchasing information. If Mr. Smythe’s information is stolen due to a cyber-attack, UH-OH, you could be in serious trouble now. In fact, there are multiple sites out there on the world-wide-interweb-thingy that offer “Data Breach Cost Calculators”, and according to one that I like the best, if you have been breached and exposed only 10 clients personal payment information or their personally identifiable information, that loss could cost you upwards of $180,000!!!!!!!!!!! That is on 10 clients!!!!!!! The average cost per record can be nearly $20,000. That number should be an eye opener for sure! Now, just to be fair, that is a large amount of loss due to a data breach, don’t get me wrong but there may be a silver lining to all of this. Let’s say you had 10,000 clients that were breached, who had their information stolen, the claim may not be extrapolated by the same per client cost that was previously mentioned. Again, it depends on the type of loss and your coverage, but typically the majority of the expense comes in the way of incident investigation costs. Those costs typically are the most expensive as the “investigation is the investigation” regardless of the number of clients, but the per client cost goes down dramatically as that is spread across all 10,000 which could essentially drive the per client average down to around $40 per client. Hey, we are still talking about a loss of $380,000 though, and that is enough to put a sizeable dent in your profits and potentially put you out of business if you don’t carry this type of coverage. OK, now that I have your attention, I can hear you pondering the ultimate question that everyone inevitably will ask, “How much is this going to cost me?!?!?!?!” Honestly, it is not as daunting as one may think. The average cyber liability policy premium for a business ranges from about $1,000 annually up to $7,500. It just all really depends on the size of your business, the type of records retained, and a myriad of other factors. All-in-all it is not as much as one would think for such a viable and real threat in today’s world. I have heard many reasons from folks as to why they don’t want or need cyber liability. From, “Well, we only use ‘Square’ and don’t keep any records of a personal nature”, to “We don’t have any records that are worth anything.” I hear you and I understand, but … Although payment services like “Square” and others take care of most of the PCI data compliance for you, maybe that is not your biggest exposure. Do you keep records on employees, or maybe some “trade secret” data of your products, or your own payment and purchasing information? Do you have a website that generates sales for you? What if your website is hacked and you lose revenue? Could this be an issue? Yes, yes it could and yes you do have these exposures! We all do. Let’s face it, everything in our life is all ones and zeros stored on an electronic device somewhere. We don’t have piles of paper files clogging up valuable square-footage like in the olden days. Well, that data has intrinsic value my friends, and without it, or if it is corrupted or stolen and held hostage, what are you going to do? If you have a cyber liability policy in place the world becomes a lot less “gloom and doom” and more “sunshine and rainbows” knowing that you may not have to bear this burden alone since InsuranceMan 2.0!!! and the cyber liability insurance carrier will be there to save the day. Do you want to know more or find out if you really have a need? Then get in touch with me and I can assist you in the process, I am here to help. Until next time … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  21. Happy Tuesday To All, In today's installment of the "Tidbit" we are going to try something I gave a shot a while back but it was not as well received as I had hoped it would be, but first ... In the spirit of always growing my superpowers (and due somewhat to regulations and complilance), InsuranceMan 2.0!!! has been a bit preoccupied with CE. Ah yes, as any of you that came from or are still dwelling in the professional world (outside of distilling), there are requirements for Continuing Education (CE) in order to keep your licensure up to date and make all of the regulators happy, happy, happy. Well, 'tis the season, and I am neck deep in it, but that does not mean I am not here to serve and protect you! I should have it all wrapped up in the next day or so, but I have been a bit busy with it all. That then brings us to the meat of the TMIT for today. As stated, I tried to do a little Question and Answer (Q&A) post a while back and I have either done such an amazing job at educating all of you that no one has any insurance questions, or people just did not want to ask questions. I hope it was the former but methinkst thou ADI-ers mayst not want to appearest naive. Whatever the case, I would like to open up this post to questions. Any questions that you may have. There are no silly questions, people, so let's have at it. Do you have questions about your General Liability, perhaps your property coverage, maybe how your stock should be calculated?!?!?!?! Do you want to know how to make a killer Pad Thai or ask what I am doing this weekend? Nothing is off limits, so let's get this party started?!!??! Who will be first???? What will they ask?!?!?! So many questions ... but all from me so far. Now it is your turn. Be the first to post a question and let's have some fun with this. Until someone does ... Stay Vigilant!!!!! Best, Aaron Linden a.k.a InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  22. The very best of Tuesday mornings to you!!!!!!! Yes, Tuesday is upon us once again! I know we all look forward to what that means! It is time for today’s installment of the TMIT. Today I am going to shed some light on something that I have mentioned many times in the past but never really took the deep dive on. That “something” is co-insurance. Ah, co-insurance. This “something” is something that most insurance agents cannot even wrap their minds around. Don’t believe me, just ask them. I have actually had conversations with underwriters who have said that they really don’t quite understand it. Well, ok. I guess their job is underwriting and not claims adjusting, BUT STILL!!!!!!!!!! As you sit down with your insurance policy to give it a loving perusal (really, who does this?!?!?!!) you will inevitably come across your property section of the policy. In that section you will see the amounts of coverage you have in regard to your building (if you own it, or maybe your tenant improvements and betterments), your equipment (at least I hope you have coverage for that), your contents or business personal property (BPP), and maybe even your stock on hand (if your agent knows what they are doing that is) to name a few. If your policy is of a more standard ilk, you will see the description of what is being covered, the limit of value of that coverage, your deductible, and more likely than not, your co-insurance limit. OOooooooo …… Yep, there it is!!!!!! It is the insurance equivalent of spotting a unicorn in an open field. It is mythical, it is magical, and really, when you see it, you may rub your eyes and wonder silently, “What the heck am I looking at?!?!?!?!?!” Co-insurance comes in a myriad of different flavors depending on the carrier providing your coverage, but typically you will see an 80%, 90%, or in some cases 100%. I will say that one of the only times you see a 100% co-insurance clause should be if it is an “agreed value” or something of the like. Fear not dear reader, I will explain this so that you understand it, no matter what percentage you have listed. Then, armed with this all-knowing insurance geek knowledge, you can sit around your next dinner party or tasting and astound people with your incredibly in-depth repertoire of insurance knowledge, which to be honest, probably won’t get you anywhere. REGARDLESS, let’s get to it. For this example we will use your building value (fear not, if you do not own your building you can simply apply this to whatever aspect of property coverage you like, it all functions the same way). Let us hypothesis that you have your building listed with a nice round value of $1,000,000 (places pinky to corner of mouth with one eyebrow lifted)!!!!!!! Excellent. Maybe your agent went to the painstaking lengths to run a Marshall & Swift cost estimator or some equivalent based on contractor costs and types of materials used in your location to accurately decipher what your actual building costs would be if you needed to rebuild from the ground up. Wait, what?!?!?!! Who did what now?!?!?! Well, this is an interesting point of fact. Where did your insurance amount come from? Did you give it to the agent and they just said ok and used it? Is it what the property would sell for if you wanted to sell it???? Either way, dollars to donuts, it is wrong. First of all, your agent should always be providing you with a replacement cost estimation of what it would run if you had to rebuild the entire building, end of story. If they have not done that, run, screaming!!!! Not that you don’t know your building and what intrinsic value it may have to you, but in this case, the cost of construction is ever changing and the only accurate way to know what that cost would be is to do an “Insured To Value” (ITV) or “Total Insured Value” (TIV) cost estimation based on the most recent and up to date figures available in your area. As to “what would it sell for”, again, WRONG! The sale value takes into account things such as location, overall land and land size, etc. The sale price is not what it would take to rebuild the building. In fact, sometimes the sale price could be much more, and in some cases it could be much less that what the building alone would cost to replace. Interesting, isn’t it?!?!?!?!?! In fact, I am going to use a real-life example for you so you can see how dangerous this can be. I have a client in a middle of the country city, a city that was hit hard with having too much warehouse real estate and not enough buyers for the market. He was able to score an incredible deal on his building. He procured a 10,000 square foot warehouse for around $150,000!!!!!! That comes out to $15 a square foot (not including the land), which is UNHEARD OF! He calls me all excited and wants to get insurance coverage for his distillery in this location. I said great, and congratulations. He tells me that he wants to insure everything like it was before, but now he owns his own building (proud moment for him to be sure) so he wants to include that on the policy for $150,000. WHOA!!!!! Pump the breaks … What? He tells me of the amazing deal he got, and he only wants to insure the building for what he has into it. Can anyone say, “co-insurance clause”?!?!?!!? OK, here we go. A co-insurance clause is put into insurance policies (almost always reflected as a percentage) and used by insurance companies to ensure that policyholders insure their property (again, any kind of property) to an appropriate value. Why do they do this? Well, it is a way for the carriers to make sure that they are receiving a fair and accurate premium for their risk involved in insuring the property. Ah yes, it all boils down to money! A prime example is the one that I just gave (as by design). This insured wanted to insure his building for $150,000 when the true replacement cost of the building would be much higher. The premium to insure a $150,000 building may be around $1,125 (if it is a $0.75 rate) as opposed to a premium of nearly $7,500 in order to insure a $1,000,000 building value. Now you can see why the carrier is interested in making sure that things line up correctly. This is one of the reasons why they have the co-insurance clause. Co-insurance works like this: It is the amount of insurance you DID have at the time of the loss divided by the amount of insurance your SHOULD have had (and just where does that value come from you are wondering????? You guessed it, mainly from an ITV/TIV that the claims adjustor runs, usually from Marshall & Swift. Oh, all the pieces are fitting together like I had this planned out or something!!!! The voice of experience is loud and clear coming from me!). Take that percentage, multiply it by the loss amount, subtract your deductible and that is what you get reimbursed from the carrier. Lost yet? Most people are, even those who have been in insurance for years. It is easy to understand when we go back to our example. We will get there in a minute, I promise. If this insured’s building has a true replacement cost of $1,000,000 and he has an 80% co-insurance clause, this means that to be in compliance with this provision he MUST insure his building to at least $800,000 (0.80 x $1,000,000 = 800,000) If he insures his building to that amount, he can avoid any kind of co-insurance penalty and he would receive the full amount of insurance (minus the deductible) in the case of a loss. Keep in mind that he will only be able to recoup the amount of value shown on the policy coverage form ($800,000 in this case), which would leave him having to out-of-pocket $200,000 in order to build this same $1,000,000 building, but that is better than what happens if you do incur a co-insurance penalty. OK, now that you understand that aspect, I will illustrate what happens if you are out of compliance. In our example it would look like this: $150,000 (DID have) / $800,000 (SHOULD have had since the value is $1,000,000 @ 80% = $800,000) = 0.1875 or 18.75% Yep, if an insurance agent didn’t know any better (which I of course do!!!!!!!) this client would have only had his building insured to 18.75% of its actual replacement value. VERY BAD!!!!! Here is the equation: Amount of insurance the insured DID have (if they had not known better): $150,000 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- = 18.75% Amount of insurance the insured SHOULD have had: $800,000 Obviously the insured is WAY out of compliance here. What happens next may make you cringe or toss your cookies, so hold on tight or prepare to look away! You have been warned. If the building were partially damaged, let’s say to the tune of $50,000 here is how this would play out: $150,000 (DID) --------------------------- = 18.75% multiplied by the loss amount of $50,000 – Deductible $800,000 (SHOULD) So you would have a co-insurance equation that looks like this: 18.75% x $50,000 = $9,375 - $1,000 deductible = $8,375 insurance claim payment. GASP!!!! As you can see, due to the insured being out of compliance and the co-insurance penalty being implemented, this insured is only going to received $8,375 on a $50,000 claim. This leaves this poor bugger having to out-of-pocket $41,625 in order to repair the building to bring it back up to where it was prior to the loss. Horrifying, right?!?!?!?!?! I don’t want to leave you with that vision today though, so I am going to show you what happens if everything is a hunky-dory! Same situation, but we have the building insured at $800,000. $800,000 (DID) -------------------------- = 1 or 100% x $50,000 loss - $1,000 deductible = $49,000 $800,000 (SHOULD) AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!!!!!!!!!! Here is the real deal folks and what you really need to know about co-insurance. Just don’t even play the game. My advice is to never try to get into a situation where you are trying to hit right on the value you need to meet your co-insurance limit. The price of concrete fluctuates, drywall, plywood, etc. Even if you think you are right on the money, it could all be different tomorrow and it could cost you big time! Think of this, what is it going to cost you to insure your building to its full value instead of 80% of its value? Well, in the case I gave above, it may cost you $1,500 more a year to insure your building (maybe!!!!) at $1,000,000 as opposed to playing the co-insurance game of Roulette and having it at $800,000 only to find out that is not enough. Do not scrimp on your coverage here, please, I implore you. Unless you are a “let it all ride on red” kinda gambler, this is something you need to stay away from. There are ways to shave some of the costs off your building replacement cost, there are. I have tricks and tips as to how to get some of the value down, but I am not going to share that here. Too many non-superhero agents read my posts to try and garner some of my super insurance knowledge, but there are ways to reduce the overall ITV/TIV. If you are interested in that further or need a comprehensive review of all things insurance-y, get a hold of me, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! and I would be glad to lend you a helping superhero hand. Until next time dear reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insruanceman2.0@yahoo.com
  23. It is Tuesday here on the ADI forums, and we all know what that means … In today’s installment of the Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit we are going back to the basics. I have had many conversations with folks who were not entirely certain what the different coverages of an insurance policy are, how they are broken up, or really what they mean. So, in today’s installment of the TMIT we are going to dissect a basic insurance policy and provide a 30,000 foot perspective. First and foremost, again, this is a very rudimentary explanation of an insurance policy. Many of you will have needs far beyond this, but for several of you it may be your first time thinking about these issues. Wherever you fall on the spectrum, I hope this is helpful. Where shall we begin? Well, let us start with what is potentially the most important piece of information on the insurance policy, YOUR NAME! You would not believe how many times I see this messed up, and you really would not believe the impact this can have on your coverage. Your name is going to be your name, the name of the distillery, entity of the distillery, etc. Simple, right? Well, for some, not really. Let’s say “Joe Smith” owns “Main Street Distillery” to keep things simple. What should the NAMED INSURED section of the policy read then? Well, who are we protecting with the policy? Joe Smith owns the distillery and as the owner/partner/member/officer he is provided coverage by the policy if done under the entity name. That would then mean that we should use Main Street Distillery then, right? Well, maybe and maybe not. Is Joe Smith a sole proprietor? If so then we have to name Joe Smith as the named insured doing business as (DBA) Main Street Distillery. Confused yet? Right! It all depends on the structure of the individual or entity that owns the business. If Joe is a sole proprietor, then in order for Mr. Smith to be provided coverage he has to specifically be named on the policy as the named insured dba the business name. If Joe set things up as a C-Corp, S-Corp, LLC, etc., then he would be afforded protection automatically by the policy under the entity. So, if it is Main Street Distillery, LLC then Joe would be included for coverage under the operations of the business. It should be simple, but it can be confusing, and it can impact your coverage in a monumental way. Case in point, let us say that Joe is a sole proprietor who is doing business as Main Street Distillery but the policy only names Main Street Distillery. In this scenario there is a loss and not only is Main Street Distillery sued, but Joe is sued individually for his negligence. Well, if Joe is not name as an insured on the policy then “Joe ain’t got no ….” coverage!!!!!!! That’s right, the only thing contemplated for coverage is what appears on the policy declarations sheet. WATCH OUT FOLKS! If the scenario is changed and the entity is an LLC, let’s say, then if the entity is sued and Joe is named individually, he would be afforded coverage via the policy since he is the owner/managing member of the LLC. See how this can be confusing and have a huge impact on who is and who is not covered? OK, so what if Joe operates the distillery as Main Street Distillery, LLC but owns the building under “Old Joe S Enterprises”? Well, how is the ownership structured here? Is it a subsidiary of Main Street Distillery, LLC dba Old Joe S Enterprises? If so, then I would hedge on the safe side and list it as such, but many miss this factor. Is it a separate LLC? If it is Old Joe S Enterprises, LLC then it could either be listed as an “Additional Named Insured”, a straight up “Named Insured”, it could be included to have coverage on the overall policy, or it could have its own policy. Ah, down the rabbit hole we go, HOLD ON!!!!!! Long-story-short, if you have never had the discussion with your insurance agent about what the ownership looks like, what the name of all of the entities are, and how they should be covered or separated out you could be in big trouble. Or … you could work with someone who has a tight grasp on all of this. Someone like me, InsuranceMan 2.0!!!, and you would know where you stand on this subject. Next we have the actual coverage, the meat and potatoes side of the policy. What you are actually being covered for and what that is based on. Again, a rabbit hole of impressive proportions in its own right. Simply put there are a few key coverage factors you will need to know about. They are as follows: General Liability Liquor Liability Property Coverage Commercial Auto Umbrella (maybe, depends on how big you are, lease contracts, distribution contracts, etc.) (and potentially) Workers Compensation. I say “potentially” Workers Compensation due to the fact that many distilleries that are starting out may not have that need as they may not have pay rolled employees, or if they do they may not be subject to work comp. It depends where you are located. See my post about Workers Comp here: For the General Liability it is broken out into roughly 6 different sections. Those sections are “Each Occurrence Limit”, “Personal and Advertising Injury Limit”, “General Aggregate Limit (Other Than Products – Completed Operations), Products/Completed Operations Aggregate Limit”, “Rented to You Limit”, and “Medical Expenses Limit (Any One Person)”. HOLY INSURANCE OVERLOAD, InsuranceMan 2.0!!!, “What does that all mean?!?!?!?!?”, you may be screaming at your screen. Well, in brief, your Each Occurrence Limit is the amount of coverage you would have for any one liability loss. Your Personal and Advertising Injury Limit would be the amount of coverage you have for any injury (physical) to a person or persons where as the Advertising portion would be if you were sued over saying something in your advertisements about someone else’s product tasting like caca and yours being superior. Then the Aggregate limit is the total amount of coverage that you would be afforded in any one policy period. So, if your per occurrence limit is $1,000,000 and your aggregate is $2,000,000 that means that the insurance company would pay out up to $1,000,000 for any claim, but never more than $2,000,000 in any given policy period. Clear as mud? No? OK, think of it this way. You have one claim wherein someone is injured and that claim is $900,000. Ooooo ….. yikes, that was dang near that Million limit, but you are ok, it was under. 6 months later you sustain a liability claim of $500,000. Boy Howdy, it is not your year! Well, due to the fact that you already used $900,000 of the million limit you may be concerned that only $100,000 will be covered. Not so! Because of the aggregate limit, the full $500,000 is covered in this claim. However, you now have had two instances that add up to $1,400,000 so you really only have $600,000 more in liability coverage to get you to the end of the year, and the way you are going, that may not be enough. The Products and Completed Operations Aggregate Limit works much the same way but this coverage only contemplated your products. So if someone were to be injured by your product, that would fall under this portion of the policy coverage. Somewhat easier, and there is more to say, but I will leave it there for the time being. Keep in mind that your General Liability premium and Products premiums are all based rated on your sales. Again, a rabbit hole that we don’t have time to go down but this is a huge pet peeve of mine. A L L sales need to be broken out and classified correctly, enough said. This is something that I find to be incorrect on about 80% of the policies I see that are not mine. I can fix this for you to make sure things are accurate, just give me a call to discuss this in detail. That bring us to the Rented to You Limit. This is for properties that you rent. WATCH OUT HERE!!!!!!! Most policies will give you $100,000 on the surface, and many of you are in lease situation where the building value you are in far exceeds $100,000. Many of the policies that I provide include an endorsement (you’re welcome) that replaces this $100,000 limit with a $1,000,000 limit. Ah, that’s better. But watch out for this, if there is no increased limit on this line item you could be in trouble. You can buy this limit up, but it will cost you some additional $$$$$$$. Last in the Liability section is Medical Expenses Limit (Any One Person) of $5,000. “Does that mean if someone gets hurt at my place, I only have $5,000 to cover their injury?” Great question my astute reader, but the answer is no. Medical Expense is kind of a sub-limit of the overall General Liability. This is for “nuisance” claims. If someone comes to your facility and slips on some spilled water (hypothetical) and twists their ankle and has to have it looked at and wrapped at the hospital, and the expense is $2,500 then the carrier would pay them that amount in exchange for them waiving their rights to seek further damages. If though, that same person who happens to be a concert pianist, slipped and fell braking their hand and now is claiming that they are going to be out of work for months on end, then it becomes a General Liability claim and would fall under that $1,000,000 limit. Now we are on to the Liquor Liability coverage. I know, I know … I hear it all the time, “But I only serve four (4) quarter ounce tastes, there is no way I can be sued for over serving under my Liquor Liability!” Well, read this: As for the Property coverage, this is where you are going to cover your assets. Your equipment, your building (if you own it), your contents, stock on hand, and miscellaneous items such as computers/boxes/labels/bottles/caps/corks/closures/etc. You are going to want to make sure that this figure is accurate for a few reasons. One, if something were to happen you want to make sure that you are reimbursed the correct amount so that you can replace your “stuff” and keep going. Second is that if this figure is not accurate you could face a co-insurance issue. Third is that you need to make sure that your product is covered correctly and adequately, especially if you are aging anything. The is so much more to this aspect but this is only a quick look at the overall coverage. If you want to know more about limits, co-insurance, deductibles, various coverage forms and what types of losses are covered, get in touch with me. How about Commercial Auto? If you own a vehicle in the name of the business, then you are going to want to place a commercial auto policy on that vehicle or vehicles. One, it protects you for a higher limit than you can obtain on a personal policy; Two, most personal policies exclude business use; Three, it protects the entity from lawsuits. You may be thinking that commercial auto does not apply to you because you don’t own any vehicles in the name of the business. I get that, but do you ever drive a personal vehicle, or ask others to do so for work related needs? If so, you have a commercial auto need. It is called Hired and Non-Owned (HNOA) Auto coverage. If you want more details go here: This brings us to the Umbrella coverage. What is this? Well, it truly is like an umbrella because it provides an extra layer of protection above the rest of the policies. Usually the limit is $1,000,000 and that is on top of your General Liability, Liquor Liability, Products, Auto, etc. So that $1,000,000 limit that you had, with an umbrella, is now $2,000,000. WHAT!?!??!!? SWEET!!!!!!! Yes, sweet indeed! However, it is truly only $1,000,000 as most umbrellas only provide an aggregate limit of $1,000,000 meaning that the limit really is just $1,000,000. Some reasons that you may consider an umbrella policy is that they are cheap, and they afford you a lot more protection. Maybe your operation is such that you are seeing many people in your facility, you do a lot of events, or your distribution area is so large that if there were tainted product and you could not recall it quick enough there would be the potential for a lot of claims. Who knows, but we can discuss that further if need be. Another reason would be that it is a requirement. Maybe the landlord requires you to carry $2,000,000 for any one occurrence. If that is the case, really, one of the only ways to achieve that is via an umbrella. Sometimes “big box stores” or distributors will require this in order for you to sell your products through them. Whatever the case may be, it is something to think about and have knowledge of. Last but not least is Workers Compensation. If you didn’t click the link above that references this, scroll back up after reading this and click on it to get a feel for what we are talking about. In that article it discusses what Workers Compensation is, who needs it, and why. I don’t want to regurgitate all of that here, so, if you think you have a need for this coverage, do yourself a favor and give it a look. OK, dearest loyal reader, there you have it. A brief (-ish) synopsis of an overall insurance policy, what to look for, what you need at a basic level of understanding, and some interspersed humor (hopefully, so that it is not as painful or dry). With that, I will leave you until next time. If you have questions, would like to learn more, or just want someone to bounce things off of (I am a superhero after all so things just bounce right off of me), give me a call, shoot me an email, or flip on the InsuranceMan 2.0!!! beacon and I will swoop to your assistance. Until next time dear reader … Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  24. Happiest of Tuesday Mornings to You, My Dear ADI-ers!!!!!!!!! Well, today’s TMIT is going to be fairly short and to the point (fairly). I am not putting up this post to Insurance-shame anyone, I am just addressing a particular issue that has been somewhat prevalent as of late. Let’s start with a scenario, shall we? You make booze. No, you actually are handcrafting a unique and individual spirit unlike those produced by anyone else. You have taken painstaking amounts of time to hone your mash bill, tweak your recipes and keep insanely detailed notes as to the overall distillation process. You put your heart and soul into what you do to make it uniquely yours, different and better than anything else available. YOU ARE A TRUE CRAFTSMAN! So, what if someone comes in to your distillery, tours around, sits down for a tasting flight and winds up saying something to the effect, “Yeah, the Vodka is OK, but not as great as Ti-o‘s though! Your bourbon doesn’t taste anything like Pen----n or J- -k.” (Yes, I know that neither of those are bourbons, that is the point here folks!) Your eyes may widen, you jaw may hang agape, and you may gaze deeply into the persons soul and think, “What the … ?!?!???!” Same can be said about what I do. I too am a craftsman. I too have taken painstaking lengths to hone my skills, to tweak my insurance recipes and keep insanely detailed notes to the overall insurance process to provide something completely different and better than anything else available, to make something that is uniquely yours! Crafting an insurance policy that no one else has, that takes into account all of the details of your unique and individual operation. So, when I hear things like, “Well, insurance is insurance, I don’t really know that you can offer me anything better than what I have.” I tend to have the same look that you might. “What the … ?!!!?” Has your current agent discussed your stock values and provided you with a spreadsheet that will calculate the correct values of your products regardless of the stage of maturation that they are in? Has your current agent taken an active interest in how your equipment is being valued and where it should be placed to get you the best insurance premium for your buck? I would say that for the most part the answer would be no. How many distilleries does your current insurance agent work with? Have they worked with 400+ distilleries across all 50 states and done import/export ocean-marine cargo policies for products being shipped overseas? If the answer is no, I think you can tell where I am going with this. God forbid, but if you or a loved one were ill and needed specialized care I dare to imagine that you would not run down to the GP doctor in town and say, “Well, I need brain surgery so let’s get this skullcap off!” NO, OF COURSE NOT! I have said it before and I will continue to say, you would seek out the best doctor in the specialized field and you would have them treat you. If you did choose to utilize the GP to treat you, well … you will probably get the results that you could expect, not so good. Same thing applies here. If you want to utilize a general practitioner of insurance, someone who writes shoe stores, a contractor or two, and a lot of homes and autos, you are going to get the results that could be expected. They are not going to understand the valuation of maturation (they may not even know what “maturation” is), they are not going to understand the difference between your tasting room and a bar, they are not going to take the time to dissect your overall business operation and make certain that each and ever aspect of off-site tastings, special events, gift shop sales, wholesale and retail sales are accounted for and how that may impact your overall premium. You very well may end up with a policy that is cobbled together with a carrier that may not be a good fit or the best use of your money, and in the case of a claim, well, if it was not done correctly you may be in a world of hurt. I always say that even if you don’t have the right insurance, you may have insurance anyway because you may have to get into a long and miserable battle of having to put in a claim against the agents E&O policy. In the meantime, and over the years that could take to settle, you may not operational and all your efforts may have been for naught. Is that a risk you are willing to take with your business, your passion, your life? If the answer is no, then I suggest at least letting an expert take a look at your policy. Let an expert dissect the coverage and ask the deep questions to see if you really have the coverage that you need for what you are doing. Each distillery is as unique as fingerprints, no two are the same. There is no catchall policy for every distillery. If you are uncertain as to what you are covered for, if the coverage has never been explained to you, or if you just bought a policy ‘cause you needed to have it, then it is time to bring in an expert. Unless you are the “put it all on the line” gambling type, I highly recommend that you get a hold of someone who has taken the time to go grain to glass at several different distilleries. To find someone that has spent nearly 20 years in the insurance industry who specializes in distillery insurance for nearly a decade. Someone that has been endorsed as the recommended insurance agent by ADI! Here, I am going to make that search easy for you, it is me, InsuanceMan 2.0!!! Heck, even if you just have questions about your current policy situation, I am more than happy to take a look at it, offer my insight and expertise, and if you choose to stay where you are at, OK. Dollars to doughnuts though, we will end up working together and have a great relationship. You may have tried the rest, now work with the best (I know, that sounds cocky and I really don’t want it to come off that way, but I have spent a very long time working diligently to understand all aspects of what you are doing as well as deep-dive into the insurance industry as a whole, so it is not cocky, I just really am passionate about what I do because I LOVE IT!) OK, end of rant for today. Was it a rant?!?!? Maybe. Was it informative? I think so. Does it clearly spell out that what you do is unique and truly different from everyone else? Yes, just like what I do for my clients is unique and truly different, something you likely won’t find anywhere else. Here is the best piece of advice that I can offer anyone that is either just starting out, has been distilling for a few years, or is a massive scale international producer, call 307-752-5961 and have a conversation. A no-obligation conversation. I guarantee, you will not be sorry. Until next time my friends …. Stay Vigilant, Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
  25. Happy Tuesday Morning, ADI-Land!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I know, I know, you are probably currently undergoing some-sort-of anxiety as well as other physical symptoms of withdrawal associated with not having you weekly dose of the Tuesday Morning Insurance Tidbit for the last couple of weeks. Well dear reader, sit back, take in a deep breath, sip your coffee or what-have-you, and relax. I am back and you can rest easy knowing that the TMIT is back in all of its outstanding glory for your reading pleasure ….. You’re Welcome!!!!!! Yes, it has been a few weeks since the last installment of the TMIT and for that I apologize. As it turns out, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! was otherwise occupied administering superhero justice in a different capacity. Suffice to say, although it was not insurance justice, it was justice nonetheless and it was doled out in healthy, hefty amounts to the evildoers. With that said, let us get on to todays “Tidbit”. As you all are aware (unless you have either been under a rock or doing an insane amount of runs and bottling to get ready for the 4th of July sales) there have been a lot of sizeable disasters in the distilling world as of late. As you know, the Barton bourbon warehouse #30 that initially collapsed back on June 22nd ruined nearly 18,000 barrels of Bourbon. Despite attempts to shore up the warehouse and save what bourbon was left, those attempts proved to be unsuccessful as the rest of the warehouse came tumbling down on the 4th of July destroying the remaining barrels. Ugh, the horror!!!! Then on July 2nd we had the Jim Beam fire in Woodford County, Kentucky that destroyed 45,000 barrels. Again, THE HORROR!!!!!!!!!! This is just insane, people! Now, to make matters worse, an alcohol plume 23 miles long has spread down the Kentucky River from the runoff killing innumerable amounts of fish. Although Beam Suntory has brought in a team of environmental cleanup contractors and consultants the damage is far reaching and unfortunately far from over. As if all of this was not enough, back on March 5th of this year Sazerac had a 120,000-gallon mash spill in which not only was there a massive cleanup involved, but people were also injured. To this I truly say, OH THE HORROR!!!!!!!! Loss of property, damaged stock, and massive cleanup efforts are one thing, but injury to human life is undoubtably something that gives us all pause and is certainly “worst case scenario”. Things can be replaced, people cannot. My heart goes out! So, why am I bringing you all this doom and gloom in todays “Tidbit” you may be wondering? “I’m just a micro-distillery and I don’t have anything close to 45,000 barrels or 120,000 gallons of mash! What does this have to do with me?!?!?!”, you may wonder. Well, honestly, it has everything to do with you and here is why. Yes, although it is true that many of these larger disasters took place at the “big boy” distilleries and many of those are either self-insured or coverage is placed with a large reinsurance company, it still has an impact on all of us. Although the losses in these aforementioned cases may not have a direct impact on many of the insurance carriers that I work with, the overarching scenarios certainly do. Underwriters are a fastidious bunch and they pay a lot of attention to the news, especially when it has to do with an industry that they are providing insurance coverage for. Although the claims of these horrible losses may never hit my carriers P&L sheets, that does not mean that they are not paying close attention to the types of losses, the severity of the losses, and the frequency at which they are occurring. That is an interesting point. “Frequency” and “Severity” are two terms that are often batted around in the insurance world. Some may argue that it is better to have one event of “severity” over the course of many years than it is to have less damage but more “frequency”. Why is that? Well, in the world of insurance, it is not “if” you will sustain a loss, but “when” according to many actuaries (and you know how I feel about them if you have read my other posts). Generally, actuaries will say that everyone will have a loss at some point in time. And if you have never had a loss, then you are due to have one sooner than later. I don’t like that saying, but it is somewhat true. “Severity” is sometimes better in that if you have one large loss over the course of a decade it could be said that everyone is due to have a loss and that may not be as impactful to your premium as having multiple smaller losses every year or so. The reasoning behind this is, that if you are having losses more often, than there is potentially something inherently wrong with your process, safety protocols, or overall operation. Underwriters and actuaries do not like “frequency” in the slightest. These types of losses often have a greater impact on your overall premiums and can even lead to loss of coverage completely. Circling back around, these news stories and losses have an impact on the industry as a whole since they demonstrate that there is a potential for losses within the distillery business. Fire is of course one of the utmost concerns that carriers have when insuring alcohol. Alcohol is flammable and fire can spread quickly. In the case of the Jim Beam fire, they are hypothesizing that the initial fire was started by a lightning strike. Obviously, if lightning were the cause than this was not an operational or safety issue on the part of Beam Suntory, but it still resulted in an incredible loss. A loss that now is not just a loss of product, building, and value but now it is also an environmental loss, or a loss due to “pollution”. The point to all of this being that no matter your size of operation, things can and do happen. Things that more often than not are out of your control. Tanks leak, structures give way, fires break out, and people can be injured. If it can happen on a large scale at facilities who have been honing their skills for hundreds of years than it can certainly happen (albeit on a smaller scale) at any size operation no matter the precautions taken. Afterall, that is why they are called “accidents” and not “on-purpose-es”. Take for instance the matter of the Jim Beam fire. According to sources, the building was equipped with a fully functioning sprinkler system, yet the results were a complete loss. (ASIDE HERE … I have made this argument time and time again to underwriters, fire marshals, etc., that sprinkler systems do not stop these types of fires, if anything they only possibly mitigate the damage slightly, but I digress!) Could they have had lightning rods in place? Maybe. Would they have helped? Possibly. At the end of the day though, although this loss may have been due to an “act of God” (again, I don’t like that term. I would like to think that God, no matter your manner of religion, would never destroy so much delicious alcohol) and not due to their policies or procedures. A true “accident”. Accidents though are what drive insurance premiums and cause underwriters and companies to tighten up their already stringent underwriting guidelines. That is the impact on all of us. That is the issue at hand. This is why these losses are devastating not only to those who have sustained these atrocities, but to all of us in the industry as a whole. As I have written about previously (see: ), carriers have been undergoing an underwriting guideline tightening over the last 6 months or so and these stories certainly are not helpful. So, take heed and be warned, the difficult underwriting requirements that we have all been facing could potentially become more challenging in the months to come. So far, we have not seen an increased impact from these issues, but they are relatively new on the scene, but be prepared in the months to come. In the meantime, if you are struggling with your insurance coverage, need coverage to get up and going, or want to have a more in depth conversation about pollution coverage as it relates to the alcohol industry (especially if you are close to a natural body of water or waterway), just call on me, InsuranceMan 2.0!!! and I will zing to your rescue. Until next time dear reader …. Stay Vigilant!!!!!!! Aaron Linden a.k.a. InsuranceMan 2.0!!! 307-752-5961 insuranceman2.0@yahoo.com
×
×
  • Create New...