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Differences between Distilamax RM & SR

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Just wondering if anyone has any experience with Distilamax RM or SR and what their results were with a mollases based rum?  Or just experiences with any style rum. Thanks

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I have used RM a lot and it makes nice rum.  I have used it with almost 100% cane sugar and mixed with molasses, both work well.  Looks like a rolling boil when it is fermenting. 

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We also use RM for our rum. 100% molasses at 71% TSAI.  Gotta keep an eye out on pH bottoming out.  We started with an agressive nutrient regimen but now only dose with DAP spread out over the first three days.

 

 

 

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Awesome thanks guys. Would you say it’s got more character than say EC1118? I am wanting to make a heavier bodied rum with more of a ester profile than what EC1118 contributes. 

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EC1118 should produce very little character but has a higher alcohol tolerance. I personally prefer plain old bread yeast for character but it has low alcohol tolerance, so finishing with ec1118 as the bread yeast is petering out can give the best of both worlds.

 

Red Star Champagne yeast is a close kin to ec1118, however is much cheaper when bought in bulk, and has the benefit of being quicker to reproduce after initial pitch, and can survive colder temps that would kill ec1118.

I know lots of people like the Danstill EDV 493 for rum, but I am not particularly keen on it, it does ferment well but produced too many off flavors for me at low temps. it could just be my palate, and those "off flavors" where character.

I know this was intended as a discussion on nutrients, but has taken a turn into yeast strains, so take my advice as what it is.

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Edv493 is Distillimax RM, I think it makes a nice rum.  I don’t like SR - aka 46edv.

You can coax a clean white rum from ec1118 - aka Distillamax LS.

 

 

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SR/46edv was isolated in France from beet molasses fermentation.  It’s goal is high ethanol yield fermentation, with low congener production.  In addition to beverage production, it’s also sold for fuel ethanol.

RM/edv493 was isolated in the Carribean from Molasses fermentation.  It’s goal is a congener profile characteristic of rum.

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17 hours ago, Silk City Distillers said:

beet molasses fermentation

What exactly is beet molasses? I assume the "waste" from producing beet sugar but don't want to, well, assume.  I agree with you re: SR / RM. We too use RM in our unaged white rum.  SR is, well, uninteresting. Early on we did produce a sugar based neutral which initially suffered from that "sugar twang". Switching from EC1118 to SR cleaned that up a bit. We've since switched to corn.

 

 

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On 1/4/2019 at 7:58 AM, indyspirits said:

What exactly is beet molasses? I assume the "waste" from producing beet sugar but don't want to, well, assume.  I agree with you re: SR / RM. We too use RM in our unaged white rum.  SR is, well, uninteresting. Early on we did produce a sugar based neutral which initially suffered from that "sugar twang". Switching from EC1118 to SR cleaned that up a bit. We've since switched to corn.

 

 

Correct, it is the waste from beet sugar refining. It's disgusting. It can not be consumed by humans, inedible. I think it can be consumed by livestock. The only way you might want to use it for spirit is if you distill the ferment to completely neutral spirit.

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Cointreau is known to be made using beet ethanol.  Stroh from Austria was widely reputed to be "rum" distilled from beet sugar.  I hear that many French Liqueurs use beet ethanol as the base.

 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Silk City Distillers said:

Cointreau is known to be made using beet ethanol.  Stroh from Austria was widely reputed to be "rum" distilled from beet sugar.  I hear that many French Liqueurs use beet ethanol as the base.

Yes, beet ethanol (as neutral spirit) was used in France for many spirits and liqueurs, especially once grape became scarce during phylloxera epidemics. Most notably, it was used for many absinthes. Beet sugar "rums" like Stroh's were never made from molasses, but from beet syrup, second to last step product in refining beet sugar. Still a challenge to make a good spirit from that. I did my own tests making beet syrup "rum".

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3 hours ago, Silk City Distillers said:

I hear that many French Liqueurs use beet ethanol as the base.

Do you know of any commercial vodkas that are from beet ethanol? Curious if I can tell the difference between those and corn / cane. I'm certain many of our first forays into distilling started with a bag of Domino sugar, bakers yeast,  garden fertilizer and a few multi-vitamins. To say the resulting spirit was anything but rough and twangy is a compliment. 

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I have used SR for very clean rums and high proof spirits. Works great for a very clean spirit.

RM temp has to be watched, mine one time came to a stand still when the temp dropped to 72f I raised the temp to 85f and it took off like a rocket. Because it is from the Carribean it operates at a higher temp I find.

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