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Rubbery Ring of Corn on bottom of my mash tun


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Fellow distillers, 

on our maiden voyage we had heat issues after dough in, we dumped 840lbs of hammer milled corn into our mash tun and since we could not get it hot, it formed a thick rubbery ring of corn that gel'd together. we corrected our heating issue and filled with water and boiled for new two hours and cannot break this thing up. Unfortunately the chinese manufacturer did not give me a manway an american can fit through to get in and clean it. Any recommendations how to liquefy this crap to drain it out? 

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7 hours ago, Hudson bay distillers said:

you could stuff the guy in there that sold you that mash tun with a scrub brush .......im kidding i jus couldnt help myself ..imglad you got ur out fit going ....onward and upward buddy 

tim 

 

that was my first thought, when my son went to china to visit the factory and inspect the equipment them little chinese guys crawled in and out like ants on a hill. so it never dawned on him that that manhole was too small for us. 

Anyway Thanks Tim

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I have always had great success with this product removing organic materials that were baked on, dried on or however it was built up.

the trick is time and heat. Just let it do the work. Running your mixer may help it speed along.

This is just my experience with the product. You could call Five Star and get their professional advise

https://www.fivestarchemicals.com

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14 hours ago, Dehner Distillery said:

make sure the mixer is turning the correct way.

looking down in to the mash tun it is spinning clockwise. how do i know if that is correct? the vortex created appears to pull upwards.

 

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15 hours ago, Georgeous said:

looking down in to the mash tun it is spinning clockwise. how do i know if that is correct? the vortex created appears to pull upwards.

 

ok then its wrong.

you want the blades to push down

When you tell me they turn clockwise it does not matter because I have no idea what pitch they are, Left  or right hand blades????

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Two options whichever you feel more comfortable with ... 1.  Swop two wires around of your three phase  or, .. 2.  Change direction of your VSD around in its setup.

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In the future I would use more premalt or add enzymes around 130 degrees before heating to 212. The gelled corn means starches weren’t converted into sugar. Learned this when I forgot to add enzymes as a premalt for a 100% corn whiskey and had to shovel out about 100 pounds of corn jelly from the bottom of a cooker. 

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Very painful effort with a pressure washer and a big catch pan and made a mess but thank goodness I have a 4 inch bottom dump drain. I did not have PBW on hand probably would have been a lot cleaner method we are all good to go now thank you everyone for your help

123_11.jpg

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I don’t have a mash tun so pardon my ignorance- we make booze from fresh sugarcane juice. Somebody care to explain why the direction of force matters regarding the spin direction? 

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12 hours ago, nabtastic said:

I don’t have a mash tun so pardon my ignorance- we make booze from fresh sugarcane juice. Somebody care to explain why the direction of force matters regarding the spin direction? 

Because a mixer in a cylindrical vessel shouldn't be straight down and in the middle. It should be offset and angled with the mixing blades pushing the liquid down, not up.

A vertical shaft in the middle of a cylinder will be prone to vortex, which can easily cause the shaft to wobble and potentially fail, and it will also not mix efficiently. Some manufacturers will put little blades on the sides of the tank to stop the vortex and to promote better mixing --but it's a solution to the problem of poor engineering.  A vertical system will also want to spin the liquid, and once it's spinning with the shaft the mixing blades won't cause as much turbulence since their speed relative to the liquid has gone down dramatically.

Mixing blades that are "pulling up" typically won't mix that well, and you'll probavly get a terrible amount of surface splashing (remember, there's a jet of fluid coming from the blades).

The direction the shaft spins isn't important as long as the entire system is made to spin that direction.

 

So, multiple reasons.

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Some videos

This first one doesn't denonstrate correct shaft placement. They simply put it off center yet still vertical and say "see".

 

This second video actually shows the correct placement, and it's very easy to see that it works much better than the other placements.

 

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11 hours ago, Skaalvenn said:

very easy to see that it works much better than the other placements

Super interesting. Guess my agitator is not placed ideally. I definitely get a vortex, and now I know what the side fin that makes cleaning such a pain is for.

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