Jump to content
Allan

Pneumatic Air tools for mixing...safe or deathwish?

Recommended Posts

Hey all, 

I've done plenty of searching, but forgive me if this has been answered ad nauseam - haven't found anything on the topic. 

I'm wondering if your run-of-the-mill (think DeWalt, Aircat, Etc...just search "pneumatic drill" on amazon and you'll get the breed) tools would be acceptable for mixing a small tank (70 gallon stainless variable capacity) of booze? 

I deal mostly in lots of this size...so I'll empty a barrel and proof it down. Approach thus far has been to pump-over. That's fine. But I'd prefer a more efficient method for mixing re: proofing down. I Know that the ideal would be a multi-thousand dollar "ATEX" industrial pneumatic mixer (the kind I see which are designed for 55 gallon drums and such) would be the "obvious" answer. Still. 

Does anyone have any insights into the safety of these pneumatic hand-held drills? My guess is that the concern would be static electricity ...?

We've all seen these stainless steel mixing chucks, the kind that you might use for typical food use or perhaps mixing paint or whatever...I've got one with a 1/2 inch chuck for a standard drill, and I see all these pneumatic drills that are really built for socket sets and whatnot. 

Any insights would be appreciated. Would love to save the money in the short term, but wifey and kids would probably appreciate the pump-over method if there's any doubt otherwise :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HDPE Paddles work great too.  A little bit of elbow grease, but pretty reasonable and no explosion risk

  • reaction_title_1 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why the intense mixing? Use a paddle if you feel the need to agitate, otherwise proof slowly and allow it to rest.

  • reaction_title_1 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, yes, I should have specified that I also have SS mixing paddles, HDPE paddles etc. Getting a tank fully turned over manually with paddles and pump-overs does the job, yes. No disagreement there. I have a use for the pneumatic-powered mixing paddle in other operations outside of ATEX concerns. But would like to use it in the distillery if I could.

Having said that, my question really has to do with whether or not these pneumatic drills are safe.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...