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Does the term stillage apply in column still distillation

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I understand stillage is what is left behind in a pot still after distillation is known as stillage (variously called pot ale and vinasse)

My question is whether the term applies to column (continuous)  stills in any way?  Is the pumped wash (ready for stripping) filtered in some way before being pushed into the analyser of the column still ?

Thanks

 

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The bottoms product from a continuous stripping column (beer still, analyzer, etc) and the stillage from a batch distillation from wash are the same.

There is no filtration involved in most stripping columns, they are designed to handle the solids load.

You might, however, find more alcohol in the batch distillation stillage, but that's simply procedural.

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most but not all continuous column stills are designed for grain in distillation. This means a on the grain bourbon wash can be sent through a column grain and all.

One of the essential steps in running this type of wash through a continuous column is that it must be throughly mixed, as solid chunks of grain or yeast can easily clog up the system.

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9 hours ago, captnKB said:

One of the essential steps in running this type of wash through a continuous column is that it must be throughly mixed, as solid chunks of grain or yeast can easily clog up the system.

Also why you are more likely to see hammer mills vs. roller mills.

And the concept of a beer well, a kind of surge tank used as the feed tank for the stripping column (instead of feeding directly from fermenters).  Usually a beer well will have a mixer to keep the liquid/solids well suspended, but also to de-gas CO2 (remove bubbles) that can cause headaches with foaming and non-condensible gasses.

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