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George A

Bench still for Proofing

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I believe that working at 30°C is a practical solution to the problem, and would be a good way to do internal (i.e. non excise) measurements that you would use for blending or proofing calculations.  But you might run into problems with excise authorities who want to impose the letter of the law.

There are two areas where the authorities might object. The first is that you will probably not be able to purchase volumetric flasks that are calibrated at 30°C.  If you measure 250 ml at 30°C in a flask calibrated for 20°C the true volume (at 20°C) would be 294.4 ml.  But if you start with 294.4 ml and then make up to the same 294.4 ml after distillation does that introduce any error?  I don't think so.

The second possible objection would be that if you measure the proof (or ABV) with an hydrometer at 30°C you would have to correct back to 20°C (or maybe to 60°F) and that is quite a large correction.  It can be done, but whether it would be acceptable to your inspector is something you would have to negotiate with them.

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1 hour ago, meerkat said:

If you measure 250 ml at 30°C in a flask calibrated for 20°C the true volume (at 20°C) would be 294.4 ml.  But if you start with 294.4 ml and then make up to the same 294.4 ml after distillation does that introduce any error?  I don't think so.

I was thinking the same. 

If you want to use your hydrometer you can always cool the sample down. 

 

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