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Neil

How to add sugar to VODKA

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So you think I added a costly step to my fermentation process in order to produce a false sweetness?     Come on man.....

 

 

Ethyl acetate is synthesized in industry mainly via the classic Fischer esterification reaction of ethanol and acetic acid. This mixture converts to the ester in about 65% yield at room temperature:

CH3CH2OH + CH3COOH → CH3COOCH2CH3 + H2O

The reaction can be accelerated by acid catalysis and the equilibrium can be shifted to the right by removal of water. It is also prepared in industry using the Tishchenko reaction, by combining two equivalents of acetaldehyde in the presence of an alkoxide catalyst:

2 CH3CHO → CH3COOCH2CH3

Silicotungstic acid is used to manufacture ethyl acetate by the alkylation of acetic acid by ethylene:[5]

C2H4 + CH3CO2H → CH3CO2C2H5

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I hereby nominate mrjeffthurmon for Most Disagreeable Distiller.  You have stolen my title.

And congrats on the excellent wikipedia usage.

 

 

no wonder Tito booted you

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I realize that I am almost two years behind the times but if you need to be a snob for your own gratification, WTH are you on here?

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Just a quick re-visit of this topic, as we have a contract that was asking about it.  I've seen folks post on here about adding sugar prior to proofing and after proofing.  Correct me if I'm wrong (famous last words), but I believe the group suggesting adding sugar prior to proofing are talking about prior to bottling proof, not at 190 proof.  Depending upon your volume, if you added 2g/L at 190 and then proofed to 80, you would possibly/probably go below the 400-600ml range.  I just wanted to clear this up or get another's input.

 

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By regulation, you must make the cut to bottle proof after all other operations have been completed, which includes sugar additions.  When you should do that , from an operational standpoint, is a matter about which I am not competent to comment.   

Here is what the regulations say:

  • Sec. 19.346  Determining obscuration.      A proprietor may determine, as provided in Sec. 30.32 of this chapter, the proof obscuration of spirits to be bottled on the basis of a representative sample taken from a storage tank before the transfer of the spirits to the processing account or from a tank after the spirits have been dumped for processing, whether or not combined with other alcoholic ingredients. The obscuration will be determined after the sample has been reduced to within one degree of bottling proof. Only water may be added to a lot of spirits to be bottled for which the determination of proof obscuration is made from a sample under this section. The proof obscuration for spirits gauged under this section must be frequently verified by testing samples taken from bottling tanks before bottling.
  • Sec. 19.353  Bottling tank gauge.     When a distilled spirits product is to be bottled or packaged, the proprietor must gauge the product after any filtering, reduction, or other treatment, and before bottling or packaging begins. The gauge must be made at labeling or package marking proof, and the details of the gauge must be entered on the bottling and packaging record required in Sec. 19.599.

I'm glad it is easier to search the regulations for answers than it is to do accurately what they require

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