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Transfer Pump (small) 4 GPM

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If you have a compressor on site something like a Yamada High Purity DP-5F would probably fit the bill, it's got both a teflon body and seals. A bit less flow than your desired 4gpm, but moving up to the larger DP-10F is a big price jump. You can occasionally find a nice one on eBay for a big discount. You'll need to mount it to some kind of pump cart if you plan to pull hoses around, as it's relatively lightweight. Would advise to control for static, but at least it doesn't have any electrics to worry about.

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Where are people buying their hoses for alcohol transfer? I have got to break down and buy me a pump and hoses. The way I am transferring right now is REAL painful !

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We have a great little explosion proof ATEX rated alcohol pump for $379.00 It will move 5 gallons per minute. We don't have it on our web site yet, so if you are interested email paul@distillery-equipment.com and I will get right back to you, or you can call us at 417-778-6100. We have many other alcohol and mash pumps available.

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We have a great little explosion proof ATEX rated alcohol pump for $379.00 It will move 5 gallons per minute. We don't have it on our web site yet, so if you are interested email paul@distillery-equipment.com and I will get right back to you, or you can call us at 417-778-6100. We have many other alcohol and mash pumps available.

We sell a little 5 GPM ATEX-rated, explosion-proof air diaphragm pump with Kalrez diaphragms for high-proof transfer. It's made by Flojet.

These look like a pretty nice option, what are the internals made out of? Anyone have any experience with these

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Hey RyeWater,

The Flojet G70's wetted parts are made of Polypropylene, Kalrez, Viton Extreme, and Hastelloy. All of these materials have excellent compatibility with high-proof alcohol.

We have many dozens of these little pumps out in the field. I have not received one back for service or for failure. The diaphragms may need to be replaced after a long, long time, but that's about it in terms of service.

Obviously they won't pump mash, but for bottling, small-scale barrel transfers and the like they're pretty much the perfect pump.

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I'm sorry if this is a stupid follow on question - but I'm trying to size out some things... I looked at the spec sheet for the Flojet C70 and I really can't tell how to read it - but it looks like the max CFM this thing would need is 2.2... Does that really mean I can get away with a tiny compressor to run it? We don't have a compressor or a lot of spare room.

Can someone confirm how little air this uses?

Thanks!!

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My small ARO double diaphragm runs fine on a small portable nailing compressor, and it is much larger than the Flojet. Per the spec, it only requires 1scfm at 40psi, 2.2scfm at 100psi. You aren't building any appreciable back pressure in a transfer situation. If finding a location for a compressor is an issue, you can always run it off a co2 tank and regulator, a 20 pound tank could probably run that for 2 or 3 hours straight.

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My small ARO double diaphragm runs fine on a small portable nailing compressor, and it is much larger than the Flojet. Per the spec, it only requires 1scfm at 40psi, 2.2scfm at 100psi. You aren't building any appreciable back pressure in a transfer situation. If finding a location for a compressor is an issue, you can always run it off a co2 tank and regulator, a 20 pound tank could probably run that for 2 or 3 hours straight.

Which ARO pump do you use?

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Yes the Flojet pump only requires 2.2 CFM to pump 5 gallons per minute so you can run it from a very small compressor. Also my price is only $379.00 + shipping. The ARO pump will be much more expensive. If you need a larger double diaphragm pump then let me know. I can get you a much better price than the other vendors. paul@distillery-equipment.com

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On 4/6/2015 at 6:40 PM, Southernhighlander said:

Yes the Flojet pump only requires 2.2 CFM to pump 5 gallons per minute so you can run it from a very small compressor. Also my price is only $379.00 + shipping. The ARO pump will be much more expensive. If you need a larger double diaphragm pump then let me know. I can get you a much better price than the other vendors. paul@distillery-equipment.com

Realise this is an older conversation but I've just looked at the Flojet G70K202A. Whilst it says it is AtEx rated there is a note on the data sheet that it should not be used to transfer liquids with a flashpoint below 37 degrees celcius...which seems to rule 97% abv NGS with a flashpoint of 17 degrees celcius out of the equation. I can't see any reason why the unit should spark, esp is the pump and hoses are grounded. Anyone else have any concerns over this?

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On 9/27/2016 at 8:25 AM, Spirited said:

Realise this is an older conversation but I've just looked at the Flojet G70K202A. Whilst it says it is AtEx rated there is a note on the data sheet that it should not be used to transfer liquids with a flashpoint below 37 degrees celcius...which seems to rule 97% abv NGS with a flashpoint of 17 degrees celcius out of the equation. I can't see any reason why the unit should spark, esp is the pump and hoses are grounded. Anyone else have any concerns over this?

I talked to our Flojet rep about this a while back. The older data sheet did have that warning. It's been removed from more recent versions, such as the one here.

As I understand it, the reason the warning was included in the first place is because a long time ago a customer tried to use a small Flojet electric impeller pump to transfer boat fuel. It didn't end well. From that point on they included the boilerplate warnings on all their pump sheets.

There are still old data sheets floating around on the internet, of course. The new ones simply give warnings that it must be used in compliance with ATEX directives, as well as outlining how those directives apply to a number of flammable fluids.

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17 hours ago, MichaelAtTCW said:

I talked to our Flojet rep about this a while back. The older data sheet did have that warning. It's been removed from more recent versions, such as the one here.

As I understand it, the reason the warning was included in the first place is because a long time ago a customer tried to use a small Flojet electric impeller pump to transfer boat fuel. It didn't end well. From that point on they included the boilerplate warnings on all their pump sheets.

There are still old data sheets floating around on the internet, of course. The new ones simply give warnings that it must be used in compliance with ATEX directives, as well as outlining how those directives apply to a number of flammable fluids.

 

15 hours ago, JustAndy said:

We've been using the flojet pump from TCW for a few weeks and have been pleased with it's performance.

Thanks for the feedback. I finally got an email back from the UK distributor. They advised on not using it...that said they did not really know what AteX was all about. My only concern was with the flashpoint issue. If its a air operated unit with non sparking components and no major build up of heat then there is surely a lack of ignition point. As you folks are still around to testify to it's use then I'm confident it will be okay.Cheers

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Michael at TCW gets the absolute highest ratings in my book. We use the G70 that came with mounted on our Mori filler for a variety of spirit transfer tasks. Harvesting barrels, filling barrels, bottling etc.

Justin Manglitz

ASW Distillery, Atlanta GA

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