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Jonathan Forester

What type of stills do you have?

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Hi Folks- I was just wondering what type of stills do you have? I figure almost everyone is running the steam jacketed types. If so which make, size, additional feature?

Are any of you old school using a direct fired pot still and such? That's what I'll be working with for at least the first few years.

I will have one of "The Colonel's" 60 gallon/225 liter Georgia Ridge with an additional Ozark Mountain head. Low budget but I've heard good things about his products.

http://www.coppermoonshinestills.com/id25.html

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We have two 600L copper pot stills which are direct gas fired, switchable between pot and a full frac columns, plus a larger 2500L pot for stripping, again direct fired.

Why direct fired?

  • It is much cheaper to construct and does not need a boiler
  • Organic production can not use direct steam, and jackets are less efficient
  • We are not on town gas, so we need to use propane, hence efficiency is key
  • Direct firing is traddional, there are many quirky (and beneficial) reactions that occur on the floor of the still with direct firing because the interface temperature is so high
  • We make Cognac style brandy, so again traddition is important. Brandy production is France is regulated to only use naked flame.

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Hi Folks- I was just wondering what type of stills do you have? I figure almost everyone is running the steam jacketed types. If so which make, size, additional feature?

Are any of you old school using a direct fired pot still and such? That's what I'll be working with for at least the first few years.

I will have one of "The Colonel's" 60 gallon/225 liter Georgia Ridge with an additional Ozark Mountain head. Low budget but I've heard good things about his products.

http://www.coppermoonshinestills.com/id25.html

Jonathan, I just realised that you are planning to make rum. Rum production in a direct fired still will present a lot of coking problems, the heavy unfermentable solids will burn on the bottom of the still. You need to make sure your really clarify the wash well before distilling (centrifuge? look around for an old ex-dairy Alfa-Lavel centrifuge) Also, regular caustic cleaning is going to be required, be sure to pacify the pot after cleaning or your two year plans will turn into 2 months.

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Jonathan,

I use direct fired pot stills for the last 10 years because they yield the most flavor to my spec.

Don't worry about how you start, you'll be changing and improving the design yourself as you go. I suggest having a modular design, where you could add parts later, even if you don't know what they are now.

Best regards,

Donald R Outterson

Hi Folks- I was just wondering what type of stills do you have? I figure almost everyone is running the steam jacketed types. If so which make, size, additional feature?

Are any of you old school using a direct fired pot still and such? That's what I'll be working with for at least the first few years.

I will have one of "The Colonel's" 60 gallon/225 liter Georgia Ridge with an additional Ozark Mountain head. Low budget but I've heard good things about his products.

http://www.coppermoonshinestills.com/id25.html

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Yeah, I figured that. I have enough room in the distillery to set up different processes. I think I may have to go take a metal working course since I am going to be playing with versions of pot stills and such and am on a low budget. I'm glad my partners have light industrial engineering backgrounds besides being winemakers. This is going to be fun if I don't go broke.

Jonathan,

I use direct fired pot stills for the last 10 years because they yield the most flavor to my spec.

Don't worry about how you start, you'll be changing and improving the design yourself as you go. I suggest having a modular design, where you could add parts later, even if you don't know what they are now.

Best regards,

Donald R Outterson

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I have a 450L with an eight plate side column shipping any day now. It is from Christian CARL.

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Yeah, I figured that. I have enough room in the distillery to set up different processes. I think I may have to go take a metal working course since I am going to be playing with versions of pot stills and such and am on a low budget. I'm glad my partners have light industrial engineering backgrounds besides being winemakers. This is going to be fun if I don't go broke.

We have three stills. A 500 l. Alembic, a 300 l. moonshine/stripping pot that we made and a 450 l. Christian Carl with a four plate side column. Obviously for different applications.

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We are using a Stupfler Alambic Still... hand made in Bordeaux by a 3rd generation still maker and master craftsman. Natural Gasdirect fire, 500 liter capacity.

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We use two 380l stills, one plated column and one stripping still. Both use immersion elements and we run grain washes & rum without issue.  

  • Confused 1

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