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Odin on Gin

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... and congrats to Peter Mulryan and his Blackwater Distillery for being nominated best international gin producer of 2017 by IWSC!

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If you are from North America and want to learn what we have to share on distilling, fermenting, and of course award winning gin making, please see attached link:

http://www.newworlddistillery.com/news/

We are organizing a new 3-day workshop at the New World Distillery in Utah. In January, so if you want to combine it with some skiing, that's perfectly possible. Only half an hour from SLC Airport, btw. Participants rate our workshop with a 9.7 out of 10. Very proud of that result.

For more info and/or registration, please reach out to ashley@newworlddistillery.com

Regards, Odin.

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Shaun and Lindi launch their Vryheid Gin! Congrats guys!

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Multi-Shot vs. Mono-Shot

So a new topic that isn't about gin distillers but about gin making. Today, I want to dive into "multi shots". A term that disturbed me at first. But it was all over the (especially) UK market, so I had to dive in and find out. Well, here is what multi shot means. And if you already knew, sorry to bore you. Multi shots basically means that you make a gin and then dilute it over a bigger batch of grain neutral spirit. You use one gin run to make more gin than the actual gin run provided.

Okay. Now, some could say that its basically dilution, right? And technically it is. But the counterpoint, the counter argument, if you will, may sound like this: "But if you add way more herbs on that one gin run, you basically create a (very) concentrated gin. And that concentrate (an essence, technically, but then again: all gins are technically essences) can then be used to make more gin by diluting with more gns. Right, dilution, there you have it again.

At a presentation by the lovely looking professor doctor X and the slightly less impressive looking gin master Y on multi shots (vs. mono shots - an approach where you just make gin in one run, dilute it, then bottle it), a customer asked them, after listening carefully, if they had any advice: "Should we use it or not?" The answer was: "Well, some like it and others don't." Not very helpful in my opinion.

Let's cut out all the wording and zoom in on the essential. It's not about multi or mono shot strategies. It's simply about dilution. And about the taste profile you are after. If you are after a bold, heavy gin, you will not want to dilute. If you want to call that approach single or mono shot, because that sounds better, be my guest. If you want a lighter style gin, dilution works great. No problem whatsoever. And if you are after big, bold tasting gin AND after efficiency, yes, you can create an oversaturated gin essence, but please know there is only so many taste the alcohol - during a distillation run - can bring over. In other words: efficiency, by persuing a dilution (sorry, I mean multi shot) strategy to gin can only be taken so far. In my experience maybe 1:2. So one heavy botanicals run of - say - 100 liters of 70% results is good to add to no more than 200 liters of 70% gns. For a bold style. Anything else by definition becomes lighter style gin. Good, if that was your goal.

One last thing I'd like you to take into consideration is that on the gin run we cut. We cut out the first little bit of the run to get rid of excessive juniper oils. And we stop before the run is done and before all alcohol comes over, not to over-emphasize tails related rooty and nutty flavors. So by doing the actual gin run, we also cut the gns we work with for heads and tails. Now, depending on the quality of your gns, you may not need any cuts on heads and tails of your gns at all. But if your gns quality is not perfect (and I found most do have some heads and tails present), and you do a multi shot/dilution strategy, you will introduce nicely cut gin/gns to non-cut gns, potentially affecting total product quality and taste in a negative way.

Now, that's it for today. Almost of to catch the plane from Detroit to Madison!

Regards, Odin.

 

 

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Hi Odin-

Wouldn't "multi-shot" technically be compounding? If one is distilling a concentrated gin for the purposes of diluting it into GNS, how would that be different than adding concentrated gin essence to GNS (ie. compounding) to make a compound gin? Is it just the scale of the process that is different?

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Hi Sator Square, yeah, good point! Maybe multishot sounds fancier than compounded. On the other hand I have heard compounded being used for sorta macerated gins. GNS or vodka and soak the herbs in it and create a gin without distillation. Gin confusion.

Odin.

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Wow! Glasgow Distillery, one of our customers in Scotland, won 6 medals with their Makar gin line-up at the International World Spirits Challenge! Congrats to Liam and Ian and the rest of the team. May more medals - and more iStills :) - come your way!

https://glasgowdistillery.com/makar-gin-causes-a-stir-at-international-world-spirits-challenge-with-a-six-medal-sweep/

Regards, Odin.

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Here's a picture of one of our Texas customers starting a gin run. And let's do a post on extraction next week. And how it can help out the craft distiller at making better gins (and other products).

Here is a start. Just a few definitions so we all speak the same language. Maceration is where we put alcohol and organics together with the goal to extract tastes. Vapor infusion is where we put the organics (herbs, berries, spices) in the vapor path while distilling. Boiler infusion is where we put the organics in the boiler while distilling and harvest the taste rich gases thus created. If we extract via maceration we create an extract. If we redistill that extract and create a higher proof clear liquid, that liquid is called an essence.

All right. More after the weekend. I am about to wrap things up here. It's of to Germany in a few hours, where my daughter - goal keeper of the Dutch national girls soccer team - plays a tournament. One very proud daddy signing out for now.

Regards, Odin.

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On 9/14/2017 at 7:03 AM, Odin said:

Herbs Bill for Gin Recipe Development

Kudo's to the Yahoo group of old and to Tony Ackland, who came up with this. I just tested it, changed a few things for the better,  and will publish it over here. It is for a bold style boiler infused gin. I use it time and again and if I don't, it usually puts me in trouble.

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Procedure:

X is the amount of juniper berries. You need half of that in coriander/cilantro, a 10th of the juniper amount if you want to use angelica, etc.

Orris root, etc. only 1/100th of the amount of juniper. Peel, be careful, only a total of x/100. So if you use lime and orange, devide both in half.

Liquorice is difficult to work with. Use  a powder or do it in a seperate distillation run. Bigger chunks will vary too  much in the heat they give off: too hot or not there.

Herbs per liter of 30% boiler charge.

Run prep procedure:

Fill the boiler with (example) 100 liters of 60% the evening before the run. Throw in the juniper so it can soak. Next morning dilute to 30% by adding more water. Then throw in the rest of the herbs, peels, roots, etc. Now start the run.

I hope you find this information useful. If you have any Q's, please let me know.

Regards, Odin.

 

I understand that scaling is not always proportional but using approx. 26 g/L as my base and converting to lb/gallon and then adjusting to a 500gal batch I got:

juniper = 66#

coriander = 33#

majority spices = 6.6#

others = .66#

Does this seem like an accurate batching for a 500 gallon charge @ 30%? I plan on making adjustments based on the first run results but I'm interested in if this seems like a standard load of herbs (106#).

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Odin you are the King I love this post!!!!

I had two questions for you.

1. When I age(rest) a gin for 5 weeks does that have to be in a tank or can it be in the bottles?  And if in a tank should the tank be open to atmosphere?  I’m not talking fully open but a small valve to allow it to breath?

2. In your recommendation on how much of each ingredient to use you say herbs per liter 30% boiler charge.  Seeing it says 25-30g of herbs per liter at 30% boiler charge.  I want to make totally sure you are suggesting after watering down the boiler charge from 60 to 30% I then use 25-30g/liter of the new 30% boiler charge? And is the 25-30g/liter of juniper is that of the 60% boiler charge or the 30% after watering down?

 

Look forward to your answers!!

Jon

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Indie, you can scale this one up indefinately. No problem whatsoever. Make sure you use my formula, not the original Tony Ackland version, since it has two mistakes in there.

Flyhigher, water slightly dissolves in alcohol. In a closed bottle, this would create a slight vacuum basically preventing the marriage to take place. Storing in a big SS container is a great way to move forward. Just open the lid every day for a second.

On your second Q: I use 30 grams per liter at 30%. You can go less no problem. The 30 to 35 grams is pushing it towards cloudiness, which is a great starting point to make amazing gin. For more reading on that, see the earlier posts in this thread.

Glad to see gin is picking up in the USA! We'll bring a few gins with us for the March conventions for visitors to taste.

Regards, Odin.

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