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Odin on Gin

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4 hours ago, Odin said:

Okay, thank you very much for your feedback. We are going to make this happen. More info soon. We are aiming at the first week of June and looking at New Jersey: Corgi Distilling. Owner and distiller Bob Hageman makes amazing gins, has a great tasting room and loves to host us.

Remember, this is going to be much more than a gin school! The goal is to do your personal gin recipe formulation, so that by the time the workshop is done, you'll know all there is to making amazing gin ... and you'll have your personal recipe ready to launch into production.

We'll dive into:

- Odins Theory of Distillation;

- Recipe formulation;

- How distillation can help you harvest the tastes you are looking for;

- Methods of flavor extractions (pros and cons);

- Taste evaluation: The Objective Taste Model;

- Still design and gin: how your specific still needs to be set-up to maximize results;

- And so much more.

And we'll do gin runs, make extracts, essences and a whole lot more, while working in small groups of 2 to 3 to push not only your knowledge but also your experience in gin making forward.

I am very excited about all this!

Regards, Odin.

What would the cost of something like this be?

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We are still working on the pricing, Proof. The reason I do not know yet, is that we are considering a few things. Like bringing over an additional world class gin maker from the UK. And we are even considering bringing a lab gin still for everyone. To do the gin recipe development on and to take back to your distillery later for possible future experiments. That kit is still in development, but it would be awesome to work with. Column, potstill, reflux still and extractor in one machine. Only a few liters big, but amazingly versatile as a kit to develop ANY future product in. Not just for gin! A hole laboratory set-up in just one piece of equipment. See picture underneath for a the prototype we are building right now. Also, we didn't decide yet on how many people we'll allow in. What are your guys ideas on this?

Regards, Odin.

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On 3/23/2018 at 9:09 PM, Odin said:

We are still working on the pricing, Proof. The reason I do not know yet, is that we are considering a few things. Like bringing over an additional world class gin maker from the UK. And we are even considering bringing a lab gin still for everyone. To do the gin recipe development on and to take back to your distillery later for possible future experiments. That kit is still in development, but it would be awesome to work with. Column, potstill, reflux still and extractor in one machine. Only a few liters big, but amazingly versatile as a kit to develop ANY future product in. Not just for gin! A hole laboratory set-up in just one piece of equipment. See picture underneath for a the prototype we are building right now. Also, we didn't decide yet on how many people we'll allow in. What are your guys ideas on this?

Regards, Odin.

a4ac37db-8a5b-4db5-a5cb-95eb2cbe0f42.JPG

Well I am ready to sign up - just let me know!

-Scott

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Congrats Jon, on winning another medal with your Canterbury Gin!

Regards, Odin.

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Wanna see some iStill Gin Magic? Check out the movie in the link underneath:

 
We'll teach how to do this during the Jersey City Advanced Gin School!
 
Regards, Odin.

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Hi Odin, I'm santiago from Argentina, first of all, I'm sorry if my English is not good haha. I saw a video of you making a gin on YouTube and if it's not a problem, I want to ask you something because I'm new to the subject of distillation and I'm learning.

i will destill a neutral alcohol with 96%, first I reduce the abv with destilled water to 40%, I would like to know when to start collecting distillate and when to finish. From what I understand, you should start collecting at 80ºC (because the metanol) and finish no further than 92ºC (tails will destroy my flavours ? ). I'm wrong? 

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It depends a bit on the still you use and the flavor profile you are after, BJ! If you use an iStill you'd be pretty much spot on for a multi-dimensional gin. Front, middle, and back. I just helped set-up a new Irish distillery and those were the settings we dialed in. I do advice you taste, especially from 91C onwards to make sure you don't make your gin to tails oriented.

On Ireland ... the visit here was amazing. Beautiful distillery (see my other tread on how iStill is doing), amazing people, beautiful weather.

And a nice surprise on the way out, via the airport: our customers are taking over the shelf all over the place. Rumor has it that "we" kicked back big alcohol and made them lose 55% market share in the last two years. Craft distillers rule!

https://istillblog.com/2018/05/17/istill-customers-take-over-irish-gin-market/

Regards, Odin.

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And here's a picture of Tim picking up his iStill 100 for product development. Genever and gin will be among his first products! A dozen iStill distilleries in Belgium and counting!

Regards, Odin.

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We still have two places available for the iStill Advanced Gin School in Jersey City! If you want more info, please reach out to jason@istillmail.com or veronika@istillmail.com!

For more info, see:

https://wordpress.com/post/istillblog.com/12383

Regards, Odin.

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Another success for an iStill customer. Congrats Craig!

Regards, Odin.

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Two more medals for one of our gin customers. Congrats Boatyard!

Regards, Odin.

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Verdant Spirits, proud winner of the Best Scottish Spirits Award and iStill customer, is building a visitors experience center! Congrats, Andrew MacKenzie, owner and distiller!
 
For the article and a nice movie, see:
 

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Bart Joosten, owner and master distiller at Eaglesburn Distillery, congrats on winning two more gold medals for your great gin!

Regards, Odin.

 

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Craig Innes in the iStill University Network:

Absolutely delighted to have received an IWSC Silver medal for Devil’s Staircase and an IWSC Bronze Medal for Gin & Tonic! Congratulations also to all you other i-stillers who made the cut this year! https://iwsc.net/result/search. To receive such an accolade within a few months of our launch is incredible!

 

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And congrats to Meanie Distilling, Schouten Distilling, Oakvilla Distillery as well, for winning medals at IWSC!

Regards, Odin.

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Joe McGirr, congrats on your Boatyard Distillery winning two silver and one gold medal at IWSC as well!

Regards, Odin.

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On 12/22/2016 at 6:01 AM, Odin said:

Aging White Gin

I think there are two topics here. First, the making, diluting, and bottling of gin, does that require any aging? Secondly, there is a big move towards barrel aged gin. I will start with the first question first ... and I will leave "barrel aged gin" for another post.

White gin requires aging. Not much, but you can't just dilute it and bottle it and sell it. Well, you can, but you won't create the best tasting gin that way. A gin that's bottled right after it's been diluted to bottling strength has two issues:

1. It tickles on the tongue;

2. Taste is not integrated.

The tickling of the tongue is a very good indication that a gin is not yet aged out. The tickling is caused by alcohol sucking water up water. Since alcohol is highly hydrofile or hygroscopic, that makes sense ... if you didn't give your gin enough time after diluting it to bottling strength. If you add water to your gin to bring it down from (for example) 70% to 45%, a process starts that I call "the marriage between water and alcohol". It is not an instant process. It is not a gentle process either. It is a process where some of the water gets dissolved into the alcohol. A process that creates heat (some), slightly lowers the total volume (total volume is lower than the volume of the original alcohol and water), and raises the proof a bit. All because water dissolves - over time - in alcohol.

So here's the first trick in letting your gin age out: dilute it, then give it like five weeks for the marriage to take place. After this period, when you taste the gin, the tickle on your tongue is gone. The five week period also helps the different oils and tastes settle out. Please try it. Make your gin, dilute it, fill one bottle, open the cap on that bottle like every day, and taste is:

- On day one (not coherent, tickly, is this the gin I wanted to make?);

- After three days (nice, its moving in a good direction, wow, this is different shit!);

- After five weeks (when you'll have reached your final taste profile).

This test will teach you that you will achieve around 2/3rds of the final taste profile already after the first three days. It will also teach you that giving it more time really pays of.

I know that waiting for five weeks can be a pain. You need more time to market, and you need more storage space. But in the end, if you want to make the best product, there is no escaping it. There are, however, a few tricks you can use to speed up the process. Here they are:

1. Use an ultrasonic cleaner (50 Watt per liter minimum and at 40 kHz) and give your gin like three ten minute treatments. It won't skip the five week rest period completely, but it will get you closer sooner. The process of especially water marrying to alcohol is sped up. And if you look in your ultrasonic cleaner, while doing it, you'll see for yourself that this process is not a gentle one: the liquids turn grey during the first part of the ultrasonification.

2. Use corks instead of caps on your bottles. A cork may allow for slight air movements in and out. If you allow for that, the process of water dissolving into alcohol can take place in the bottle. But if you have a hard capped bottle, the process of water dissolving in alcohol cannot take place, because its a process that shrinks total volume. A relative vacuum developing in the air pocket would prevent the water to dissolve properly. So ... with hard capped gin bottles, you may want to skip the white gin aging process a bit with ultrasonic treatments, or not and you wait five weeks before you bottle. The good news is: it will improve your drink hugely. And the fun thing is that if you did the tests I proposed, you'll recognize other gins as having had the appropriate amount of aging or not.

Aging white gin is not completely straight forward in the sense that five weeks will do it. Time and again, I learn that the vapor speeds and how deep we go towards tails / the end part of the run influence the aging curve. See the first post on that please. The concise? If you run your rig harder (higher vapor speeds) more aging is needed. If you run longer, more aging is needed. If you run your rig slower and cut a bit earlier, for a more floral gin, the marriage may just take as much as only three weeks to take place.

Next post in this thread will be about barrel aging gin. After that? Lets dive into herbs bills!

Regards, Odin.

Super interesting! I wondered if there is any more info (or opinions) on whether the ultrasound oxidation decreases flavor?

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Yes it can. Try a very old fruit brandy. The front part will be missing. Fruitier notes tend to get lost via over oxidation. "Over" being the key word. So if you use ultrasonic treatments you will be fine and actually develop into better taste. But you can oxidize too long and then loose them all together. Hasn't happened to me while using ultrasound though, so I guess it is a pretty okay way to move forward.

Odin.

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Visitors from China! We'll make some gin together in the coming days!

Regards, Odin.

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