Jump to content
ADI Forums
Runchero Distillery

Mashbill in pounds

Recommended Posts

I have seen some discussion about mash bill in pounds but haven't seen anyone spell it out. If my mash is 70% corn 25% Wheat 5% barley at 1000 gallons, how many pounds of each grain is that? Our farm has grown the corn and wheat for years and I am trying to determine the grain cost to the distillery. Cant do that without weight.  Distillery not up and running yet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on how high of an alcohol content you want your wash to have. This is always a nice reference if you are trying to build a recipe from scratch: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/calculator/

If you are going to shoot for a 10-12% wash, I'd guess that you are going to be in the neighborhood of 1,750-2,000 pounds, depending on what kind of efficiency you are expecting. Please keep in mind that there are may variables in the above assumptions....other things you are going to want to think about are yeast attenuation, grist profile/size, enzymes or malt only, will you cereal mash, etc..

Cheers and good luck!

Adam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep I second the 2lbs/gallon.  With 2 passes on a single roller mill, I had to go to 2 1/2lbs to get about 20 Brix after conversion. But now I have a hammer mill and have been able to drop down to 2 lbs/gallon and achieve same potential abv.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so with this 2lbs per gallon formula; using mgpi's famous 75/21/4 Corn/Rye/Barley as an example. In order  to yield 100 gallons you would need 200lbs of grain. So 150lbs corn/42lbs rye /8lbs barley, is this correct?

Also, barley is vague term, what is most common barley used in making whiskey?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Georgeous said:

what is most common barley used in making whiskey

My answer is always "whatever is lease expensive".  We use added enzymes so are not concerned with high diastatic power grains. We normally use bog standard 2-row. If you're one of those brave soles that doesn't use enzymes, you'll want to use distillers barley with a very high DP.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

curious, how do you calculate how much and what types of enzymes to use? is 21% rye and 4% barley not enough to do the trick? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it all depends if your talking about field feed barley , malted malt barley , or un malted malt barley . field feed barley is the poorest choice in my opinion . malted malt barley is best choice but is 32 bucks a bushel . un malted malt barley is a top choice at around 4 to 5 bucks a bushel but you need liquid enzyme to convert it . liquid enzymes have always been cheep insurance . 

tim 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Georgeous said:

curious, how do you calculate how much and what types of enzymes to use?

The enzymes come with documentation. I believe it's around .36ml / lb of starch.  Nice part about enzymes is you can use them during heat up so when the corn begins to gel the enzymes can get right to work. If you're using barley or rye by the time the temp is high enough to gel the starch in the corn the naturally occurring enzymes in the bar/rye have denatured.  I applaud the brave folks that use barley/rye/whatever else exclusively.  

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

41 minutes ago, Hudson bay distillers said:

it all depends if your talking about field feed barley , malted malt barley , or un malted malt barley . field feed barley is the poorest choice in my opinion .

How does field barley (I've honestly not heard the term) differ from unmalted/raw barley?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

indy that may be just a term that producers around here use . the actual term field refers to grain that is strait off the combine not cleaned or altered . 

 there are different varieties of barley grown around here some are field feed barley grown for cattle/hog  feed . some are malt barley varieties grown for the local malt plant . interesting to note not all malt barley grown for the malt plant is accepted as malt quality barley . all malt grown for the malt plant must be a malt variety and then pass there tests to be accepted as malt , germination and protein , nitrogen content ect.....  . also all malt barley is grown on contract . so if a farmer contracts a crop for 20 bushels per seeded acre and its a good year and he yields 25 or 30 bushels a acre they are stuck with the option of selling the surplus as feed barley to cattle/hog  producers  or to sell it as unmalted  malt barley . 

disclaimer ....im not a farmer nor do i claim to understand the science of grain marketing i just know what producers try to teach me ,

tim 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, indyspirits said:

How does field barley (I've honestly not heard the term) differ from unmalted/raw barley?

Field barley would be prior to cleaning.  Most times the barley would be cleaned prior to mashing just to get rid of nails, rocks, etc.  Cleaning does not eliminate DON.  However, it significantly reduces the level of the mycotoxin by removing lighter, more heavily infected kernels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Thatch said:

Field barley would be prior to cleaning. 

OK makes sense. We have been in conversion with a farmer near us who plants both barley and rye as cover crops. Were he to harvest this grain, how much work is involved in cleaning it up up to the point where we can truck it to a local maltster (admittedly I'm a city boy)?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, indyspirits said:

The enzymes come with documentation. I believe it's around .36ml / lb of starch.  Nice part about enzymes is you can use them during heat up so when the corn begins to gel the enzymes can get right to work. If you're using barley or rye by the time the temp is high enough to gel the starch in the corn the naturally occurring enzymes in the bar/rye have denatured.  I applaud the brave folks that use barley/rye/whatever else exclusively.  

 

 

 

 

When your using Rye/wheat etc for their enzymes youd cook your corn first - then cool until your strike temperature for mashing your malts/grains. Then add them in and hold till done etc etc.. So youd keep the enzymes from being denatured.

-S

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I understand how it works, but the corn remains viscous and easily worked when adding enzymes as the temp is on the way up. Stirring 800 lbs of corn as it gels without enzymes can be a challenge.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, indyspirits said:

OK makes sense. We have been in conversion with a farmer near us who plants both barley and rye as cover crops. Were he to harvest this grain, how much work is involved in cleaning it up up to the point where we can truck it to a local maltster (admittedly I'm a city boy)?

 

 

It just depends if he has a cleaner or not, and how that cleaner is setup. I've had a couple different farmers do seed cleaning for various grains we got, but only one was really setup for it, and for him it sounds like it isn't much work. The others had less efficient setups, and so it was more work. However, the local malt house should have a cleaner and should be able to take care of it. Unless they have a policy for some reason to only take in pre-cleaned grain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Tom Lenerz said:

It just depends if he has a cleaner or not, and how that cleaner is setup.

He farms about 5,000 acres. I know he puts up beans and corn but discs under the cover crops (if that's a real term). I'll drop him a line and find out.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, indyspirits said:

He farms about 5,000 acres. I know he puts up beans and corn but discs under the cover crops (if that's a real term). I'll drop him a line and find out.  

Have him talk to Caleb at Sugar Creek.  They are in Lebanon, IN and deal with local farmers.  They also have their own grain cleaner I believe.

caleb@sugarcreekmalt.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know Caleb, we've worked with him before. I'll give him a shout today. Thanks!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2018 at 6:57 AM, indyspirits said:

OK makes sense. We have been in conversion with a farmer near us who plants both barley and rye as cover crops. Were he to harvest this grain, how much work is involved in cleaning it up up to the point where we can truck it to a local maltster (admittedly I'm a city boy)?

 

 

See what Thatch said about the mytotoxins, good grain growers will have the batch tested for %, these can seriously affect your ability to send your spent grain to a farmer as it can be deadly to animals that eat it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×