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I was recently reading a different post from a few years back and hoped to get some info on this.

A large batch of pear cider sorta feel into our lap recently (Aprx. 2,000 gal). We planned to take a similar approach to most of our apple brandy runs we have done in the past and do a two run/ strip and finish distillation. The initial pH of the cider when we received it was measured around 3.5. Our stripping runs are tasting great with a decent yield but we have noticed a definite acidity to the distillate itself (pH aprx. 2.9-3) as well as noting a general blueish hue (we have a copper condenser so no surprise there). But due to the high acidity after the stripping runs even, we are thinking of adjusting the pH of the distillate prior to our second/ finishing distillation.

Should pH adjustment be happening prior to stripping runs?

 

 

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On 10/30/2017 at 5:18 PM, Muschiana said:

I was recently reading a different post from a few years back and hoped to get some info on this.

A large batch of pear cider sorta feel into our lap recently (Aprx. 2,000 gal). We planned to take a similar approach to most of our apple brandy runs we have done in the past and do a two run/ strip and finish distillation. The initial pH of the cider when we received it was measured around 3.5. Our stripping runs are tasting great with a decent yield but we have noticed a definite acidity to the distillate itself (pH aprx. 2.9-3) as well as noting a general blueish hue (we have a copper condenser so no surprise there). But due to the high acidity after the stripping runs even, we are thinking of adjusting the pH of the distillate prior to our second/ finishing distillation.

Should pH adjustment be happening prior to stripping runs?

 

 

DON'T USE A COPPER CONDENSER WITH FRUIT SPIRITS that can produce acid vapors. You likely have a fair amount of acetic acid (maybe malic acid) in the distillate, and it is creating copper acetate (maybe copper malate) which gives the bluish hue. It is toxic.

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