Jump to content
ADI Forums
klattig

Spent Grains after on-grain distillation

Recommended Posts


So we've been lautering & sparging our whiskey & bourbon in our combo tun for about a year now, and are tired of all stuck mashes & low yields.  We're ready to look into fermenting on-grain, and possibly distilling on-grain.  But, we have a nice deal going with a local rancher who takes the spent grains off our hands & feeds them to his cattle.  We're concerned that the cows will not go for grains that have been fermented (no more sweet taste).  And it seems like the grains after distilling would just be nasty after all that cooking.

Are others out there still able to re-purpose their spent grains after fermenting on-grain, or after distilling on-grain?

Thanks!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Distillers grains, wet distillers grains (WDG), distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) - when you are talking about distilling grains, it's nearly always assumed to be post-distillation.

I've eaten a handful.  It's pretty sour.  It's hard to get past the sour.

It might take them a little while to switch over if they are used to eating that candy, usually when they get hungry enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hudson bay distillers said:

dont worry they will eat the spent grain and drink the stillage just fine , spent grain is usually mixed with fresh grain and silage they wont even notice the difference . 

tim 

Cows drink the stillage?  Seriously?  That stuff seems really nasty!  We've been running it down the drain (after neutralizing the acid & cooling).  What's the nutritional value of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Silk City Distillers said:

Distillers grains, wet distillers grains (WDG), distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) - when you are talking about distilling grains, it's nearly always assumed to be post-distillation.

I've eaten a handful.  It's pretty sour.  It's hard to get past the sour.

It might take them a little while to switch over if they are used to eating that candy, usually when they get hungry enough.

So you don't do any treatment to reduce the acid of the distiller's beer?  We've been boosting the pH a little using CaCO3 - mostly to keep the yeast happy, but also because we don't want pH < 3.0 in the copper still.   A side benefit would be to make the grains a little more palatable for livestock...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, klattig said:

We've been running it down the drain (after neutralizing the acid & cooling).

Interesting. Our local utility explicitly forbids sending spent grain to waste.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, klattig said:

So you don't do any treatment to reduce the acid of the distiller's beer? 

Pre-distillation?  No, that would directly impact the character of the distillate, by causing ester hydrolysis.  I mean, it might be beneficial in a neutral spirit, but it would mute esters some in a flavored spirit.  We do adjust the pH of the liquid stillage after separating it from the solid stillage, as required by our local sewerage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, indyspirits said:

Interesting. Our local utility explicitly forbids sending spent grain to waste.  

To be more clear - we lauter out the grain, so we're only putting (treated) liquid stillage down the drain.

So, if we were to distill on-grain, are you saying that livestock will eat both the spent grains & liquids leftover in the still?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a slightly different topic, how are you cooling the mash before pitching the yeast?  We've been using a "Brutus Pro" counterflow chiller - it works OK, but is slow for our 200-gallon batches, and only works if we have completely grain-free wort.  We've thought about making a really big version of a counterflow ciller, but wondering if there's a better method?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2017 at 9:40 AM, klattig said:

On a slightly different topic, how are you cooling the mash before pitching the yeast?  We've been using a "Brutus Pro" counterflow chiller - it works OK, but is slow for our 200-gallon batches, and only works if we have completely grain-free wort.  We've thought about making a really big version of a counterflow ciller, but wondering if there's a better method?

We use a much larger stainless version of a counterflow heat exchanger (2"), with a 60 gal/minute centrifugal pump. We use this to both heat and cool a 150 gallon mash. Works okay, should work better with wash than mash, and rye mash is most challenging. The longer the heat exchanger, the more efficiently it runs. Probably still slower than jacket-cooling the mash tun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a great reference HBD! Thank you...My cows are literally yards from my distillery and I've been fretting giving them wet stillage verses drying it. Some of the ref says wet is better and at 4.2 ph. I need some dedicated hose...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×