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jeffw

fruity yeast strains

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What yeast strain do people like for fruity esters for bourbon and or malt whiskey?  

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English Ale strains fermented on the warm side.  Some might say Belgians or Saison, but there are a number of these strains that are high phenolic/clove producers, and that comes through loud and clear in the distillate.

Both Nottingham and S-04 have a nice balance of fruitiness when fermented on the warm side without significant off-flavors.

Also remember to underpitch your yeast to force higher ester production.

 

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You have a temperature range you like on the Nottingham and s-04 (high temp above the list range)?  I have never played with an ale yeast because they are ferment so low temp wise.  That said, doing a bunch of trial 120 or so gallon wash for malt (lautered), so keeping temp down should be pretty easy.

Cheers!

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Exceed the recommended temperature in both cases.  Nottingham is fairly clean in the recommended range, but will get very fruity as you push it.  78-80f is a good place to start.  TIGHT temperature control is KEY.

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Remember, you aren't making beer.  Fermenting either of these hot will give you a fairly sharp, solventy beer.  On the still you can control this with your heads cut.

Goes without saying that if you want to drive higher fruity flavors, you are going to have to dip into the late heads to get there.  Otherwise, all you did was create a bigger heads cut, and made less whiskey.  Let these two ferment without controlling temp, and you are going to be pulling massive heads cuts.

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Thanks guys!  All of that sounds about like what I was planning.  I have been making bourbon and rye for several years, but I haven't played with yeast strains in a while.  I like the idea of reexamining my procedures and trying some new strains here and there.  Started off with 15 and 30 gallon barrels, but now that I am using 53s exclusively, the oak dominates less and it makes me more curious to play around with yeast strains.

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