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jbdavenport1

Separating rye and corn into their own mashes

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So here's one for the peanut gallery. I was watching an episode of "Moonshiners' and two of the guys were running a honey wash in one still and a rye mash in another still and letting the separate vapors come together in the lyne arm and condense together. Said it made for a much cleaner spirit where both the rye and honey carried over more flavor.

That got me thinking, could you run a pure corn mash, distill it. Then run a rye mash and distill it, then blend the two together and call it bourbon (once you age of course)?

I wonder if there would be any taste benefit, operational benefit, etc.  

 

Comments from the peanut gallery.

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I am sure it made for good television.

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9 minutes ago, jbdavenport1 said:

Could you still call it bourbon?

No. You made two different whiskies, and blended them. The definition of the named types is based on percentage of grain in the mash.

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Could you just cook the two mashes separately then combine for the fermentation?

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2 hours ago, HedgeBird said:

Could you just cook the two mashes separately then combine for the fermentation?

I suppose, since they are one mash when combined. More problematic, what if you had two different beers after fermentation, then combined them. I would want to query a TTB officer on that!

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2 hours ago, bluestar said:

I suppose, since they are one mash when combined. More problematic, what if you had two different beers after fermentation, then combined them. I would want to query a TTB officer on that!

My understanding is that Buffalo Trace cooks their corn and rye separately, then combines at some later point.

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18 hours ago, HedgeBird said:

My understanding is that Buffalo Trace cooks their corn and rye separately, then combines at some later point.

Yes, that would make sense, the grains can be optimally processed separately for conversion, but then combined to a single mash for fermentation.

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That just sounds like your just blending a rye and a wheat to get to a bourbon. 

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