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Bloody Butcher Red Corn

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Hey Guys,

We are going to be expanding our distillery's heirloom corn program this spring and will be planting some additional Bloody Butcher acres in a few weeks. I was wondering if there was any interest in purchasing some Bloody Butcher futures for delivery this fall. If there are a few interested buyers, we will be sure to plant some additional acres for you! Here is how it would work:

  • $0.35 per pound F.O.B Columbia, IL 62236
  • Q4 2018 Delivery
  • Grain will be whole kernel and cleaned prior to shipping.
  • 1/2 payment up front, 1/2 payment upon delivery
  • Minimum order 1,000 pounds

If you would like to learn more or purchase, please email adam.stumpf at stumpysspirits.com

 

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Just about full on this contract. Please let me know ASAP if you are interested. Corn is going in the ground in the next 2 weeks.

Cheers!

Adam

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How much per bushel for a semi trailer full I am in Muskogee Oklahoma the best way to get a hold of me is my phone 918-441-6672

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Hey Stumpy,

      How did the futures sale work out for you and your clients?  Are you growing other varieties or is this it?  Is it organic or conventional?  What kind of bushel / AC are you getting with tihs heirloom? 

I'm really interested in growing some heirlooms as well and wondered what the commercial yield is in the Midwest.

Would you be interested in selling some for seed? 

Anyone have any feedback on the taste and other aspects?  Sounds interesting.

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On 12/7/2018 at 7:24 PM, mendodistilling said:

Hey Stumpy,

      How did the futures sale work out for you and your clients?  Are you growing other varieties or is this it?  Is it organic or conventional?  What kind of bushel / AC are you getting with tihs heirloom? 

I'm really interested in growing some heirlooms as well and wondered what the commercial yield is in the Midwest.

Would you be interested in selling some for seed? 

Anyone have any feedback on the taste and other aspects?  Sounds interesting.

We actually never had anyone put the money down ahead of time for the futures option so ended up running everything at our distillery. We did a couple of heirloom varieties this year. One was this BB and the other was a white variety. We did smaller plots of a few other things...mostly just enough to get a seed bank built up.

It is "conventional light" if that's a thing...more like minimal input. More than organic, less than conventional. We quickly found out that you can't plant this stuff at high populations. We averaged 70 Bu/Acre this year. Yields were originally looking like they were going to be closer to 150 but we had quite a bit of lodging as the crop dried in the field....A LOT of deer feed left out there from poor stalk strength. That is pretty well a common trend across most of the OP heirloom varieties we have worked with so far.

At this point, we just have enough saved for our seed for next year. Sorry. 

If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out! adam.stumpf at stumpysspirits d.o.t. com

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I have a question?  Traditionally Hickory King and Hickory Cane Corn were the only varieties of corn used in the southern appalachians for making bourbon and whiskey.  These varieties were used by Jack Daniels and then Lem Motlow switched to yellow corn because of the price.  Though my family grew some indian corn and yellow corn for other uses they and the other families on the TN side and the NC side of the Smokies only used Hickory King and Hickory Cane Corn for their whiskey

My grandfather always said that yellow corn and especially Indian Corn did not make as good a whiskey as Hickory Cane or Hickory King.    Have you ever tried those traditional whiskey varieties.  Of course due to the 13' tall stalks it does not grow well in some areas. 

Here is something else that is interesting.  My grandfather said that you can't malt yellow corn.  It will always mold.  He said that hickory king and or hickory cane were the only types of corn that malted well but i have never talked to a malting house that has ever used them.

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Hey Paul,

Yep, we've done Hickory Cane as well as Boone County White (which E.H. Taylor supposedly used) and they definitely make great tasting bourbon....different than yellow corn for sure.

The taller stalks are a bit of a pain, especially if you let it dry in the field instead of mechanically drying. As the corn ripens, the stalks get incredibly brittle. However, if you want to malt the corn, you can't really mechanically dry it because of the temps involved in most commercial driers. 

We haven't had any issues with malting yellow corn yet. We've seen 90%+ on germination rates. We've tried both OP and conventional Dekalb hybrids. If we've had any mold issues in malting, we've found they are usually related to either the malting process or raw grain storage. So making sure the corn is 13-15% before going in the bin is super important. Even when we put it in at 15%, we still run the bin fans to dry it out as much as possible.

These heirloom varieties definitely make some great whiskey!!!

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5 hours ago, Southernhighlander said:

Here is something else that is interesting.  My grandfather said that you can't malt yellow corn.  It will always mold.  He said that hickory king and or hickory cane were the only types of corn that malted well but i have never talked to a malting house that has ever used them.

From our research, we learned the same conventional wisdom, that many corns won't malt well, like yellow hard dent, because of tendency to get moldy. Whether it is true or not, it is one of the reasons malting corn was generally avoided, that and the flavor for some corn gets too "green".

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