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  1. High West Campfire is one example, check out their label for clues. I imagine it was submitted as a distilled specialty https://www.highwest.com/products/high-west-whiskey-campfire.php Tell your client that "Burch" is a totally stupid name.
    3 points
  2. There is also a whisky called Virginia Highland that blended US whiskey (malt?) and Scotch. The Scotch association went after them claiming the Highland portion of their name was geographically misleading. Since Scotch has to be bottled in Scotland you may have to be creative with how you describe the spirit. And in terms of class/type it might just end up as just whisky, blended whisky or whisky specialty.
    2 points
  3. Standard of fill is definitely the issue. Largest container allowable is a 1.75L. Generally, kegs are either built on site at accounts in soda style kegs or there is some sort of patented mechanism/process to get alcohol into a sanke-d style keg after everything has been run through the 3-tier system. The problem with the soda style keg is that it requires draft line conversion, cleaning (who does it and how often) and the account can honestly put whatever the heck they want in it. We take the second approach with a methodology we developed. One thing you do need to be careful about is state law on who can and cannot make a cocktail. In one state we distribute in, the supplier and "build" the keg at the account under the account's supervision. In another state we distribute in, the account must do everything themselves. Kegged cocktails are a bit of a gray area right now but make sure to do your due diligence before you start and understand all of your state-by-state restrictions and guidelines.
    2 points
  4. In an effort to make it clear I am not trying to be pejorative or negative or tell you you're wrong I want to start out by saying I really enjoy your anecdotal references and I welcome the conversation on this topic, but I very much disagree with your opinion of the process. LCP was never intended to make a neutral grain, thats not functionally how activated carbon filtration and purification works, and well column stills were already invented and in use by the time the LCP (allegedly) was created or committed to. It is said that LCP was invented or committed to by JD in the 1830s. Aeneas Coffey had patented his Coffey still in 1830, and Fournier had already made the first continuous column all the way back in 1814. So high proof and high purity ethanol was already a thing by that point in time. I believe that the LCP came out of a need for distillers to be able to produce better cleaner whiskey despite having an incomplete knowledge of fermentation mechanics, yeast microbiology, and frankly sanitation technology. Distillers didn't have the resources to clean their copper pots like we do today with cheap and available citric acid. There wasn't automated temp correction on ferments. From one aspect of it to me, I believe they probably were looking for ways to mitigate some off tastes and smells and flavors, but they were probably also trying to filter out solids and just stumbled upon the taste benefits. Again, not telling you you are wrong, just that I disagree. But I love the conversation. Cheers my man! If you're ever in Wisconsin look me up.
    1 point
  5. So rereading this it sounds like I take a dim view of the LCP.* I don't. For the time when it was created it really was innovative. It helped create product consistency at a time that the science of fermentation wasn't very strong and the results were less than consistent. There's lot of opportunity to do something creative with it, just not that many have. *It's not the LCP I take a dim view of - it's America's reliance on wood to create flavor. We should try to do more with the distillate. The wood should be an accent to the spirit, not the other way around.
    1 point
  6. My Bain Marie is actually a Affordable Distillery boiler 😀 Paul / Jonathan at Affordable Distillery built the 8” side column for me. I talked to Paul a bunch before I did this conversion and as always he was very helpful. Always a great guy to work with. Thanks
    1 point
  7. Also had this one https://www.logobarproducts.com/custom-imprinted-bar-mat-20-x-4
    1 point
  8. Stillage. It's kinda the generic word for whatever is left in there after a run regardless of the original material. But this is distilling so there's probably 20 other words I've never heard of that mean the same thing.
    1 point
  9. Update: I macerated at 100 then proofed down to 60 for the most recent batch. I also jacked the temp up a little at the very end when she started getting nasty and noticed that I brought out some new and positive flavors. I think its just a little bit of everything sometimes. I do believe the lower proof allowed me much more control of the spirit and that helped in a lot of ways. I ended up increasing my collection into the 60% range, about where I was hoping to get to thanks for the input everybody
    1 point
  10. To me, and I am no historian, the LCP is about a primitive way to make what in essence is vodka before column stills and and not having to redistill several times. It allowed folks to make a mediocre distillate into something neutral. Then you dump it into a barrel to get flavor. You also pick up some flavor of the wood that was used to make the charcoal also. I had a discussion somewhere*, I think here, with someone and they had mentioned using different woods, including fruit, to give the distillate a minor essence of that fruit. I think for the LCP it allowed a more consistent flavor profile by reducing any flavors coming over from the distillate. At that point you're only dealing mostly with wood flavors. It makes the blender's job easier. At this point in my speech about the LCP I normally start ranting about how most American spirits are about the barrel and not the distillate but I haven't had anything to drink tonight so I'll spare you that part... *Found it:
    1 point
  11. Hello everyone, it is a pleasure to be a part of the community! eduard@narenewableenergy.com .................... cayugaingredients.com We are located in the Finger Lakes NY and the largest producer of whey and milk neutral spirits in the Americas. Our processing capacity is close to 1 million gallons of 192p neutral spirits per year. It has been used for Vodka, GIN, liquors, Cordials and recently Light Whiskey Our spirits has amazing quality: sweet and creamy. I encourage everyone to try it! Thank you Eduard
    1 point
  12. Archi or arak is the most famous and traditional strong alcoholic drink made from milk, which was widespread in Siberia and Central Asia. Depending on the country and region, it varied in strength, raw materials and manufacturing procedure. Since archi is not a fermented drink like kumis, but a distillation product, great technical knowledge and special equipment are needed for its production. Traditionally, the Mongols made it in special distillation apparatus. It is believed that it was Genghis Khan and his warriors who brought this skill with them to the conquered lands, although the art of distillation itself originated in the Arab world, presumably in Iraq. Soyots, unlike the Mongols, made milk vodka not from fermented mare's milk, but from fermented cow's milk whey. After separating the milk into cream and whey, milk yeast was added to the latter, the whey was fermented and a light alcoholic sour drink called "hurunge" was obtained, which compensated for the lack of vitamins and microelements necessary for the body. And milk vodka was prepared like this: about one and a half buckets of khurunge were poured into the cauldron. At a distance of 2 arshins from the boiler, a wooden tub ("khyiber") was placed, half filled with cold water. A cast-iron jug ("tanha") with a tightly attached wooden lid was lowered into it. Two holes were made in the lid: one an inch in diameter, central, and the other side - very small, through which a measuring stick was passed into the jug to determine the amount of the finished drink. The cauldron was also closed with a lid, in which there was a hole with a diameter of one vershok. The cauldron and the jug, which served as a refrigerator, were connected by a curved, elbowed wooden tube ("surgo"). The ends of the tube were placed over the holes in the lids of the cauldron and jug. Then all the cracks in the lids and the joints of the tube with the boiler and the jug were coated with clay. If there was no clay, it was coated with cow dung. A fire was made under the cauldron, and the khurunge began to boil. The steam passed through the tube into the jug, cooled and turned into a liquid "tarasun". After 45 minutes from the start of the boil, 1 liter of a fairly strong drink was obtained. The longer they boiled, the weaker the tarasun turned out. If the khurunge was good, that is, the milk was fat, then the tarasun was obtained with a strength of up to 20 degrees, from a bad khurunge they received tarasun at 10-12 degrees. If the tarasun was distilled several times, then an even stronger tarasun was obtained, which is called "archi". The alcohol content in it was such that when ignited, the arch burned. It was prepared as a reserve in case of feasts, and the tarasun was drunk immediately hot.
    1 point
  13. needmorstuff, Below is a picture of one of the many stills that we have built for customers with height restrictions. This 300 gallon Ultra Pro Vodka Still with Gin Basket is less than 9 ft tall. The still is easy to operate and runs as smoothly as any 20 plate still. You can run any individual plate column and any number of individual plates in the system or bypass the bubble plate columns altogether with a turn of a handle. The dephlegmator and final condenser coolant flow is semi automated using a single thermostatic valve (not shown). The gin basket can be bypassed with the turn of a handle. Unlike certain continuous bubble plate columns, which must be torn down to remove plates to disengage them and then reassembled, no tearing down is necessary to reconfigure our Pro Series and Signature Series stills. Just the turn of the handle is all that's needed. Our fastest stills put out 75 gallons of white dog per hour and cost less than any new continuous column still that we have seen with the same output. This still can also be used as a mash tun if needed. If you would like a quote for a still that would be designed specifically to fit your needs email paul@distillery-equipment.com and we will set up a phone conference.
    1 point
  14. https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IFC2018/chapter-50-hazardous-materials-general-provisions
    1 point
  15. Our main green factors are Solar System w Insulated Electric Still/Masher local/reused construction materials for distillery building construction local and/or organic grain/sugar ect.. Cold spring water for cooling onsite reuse of cooling water for crop irrigation onsite reuse of mash as livestock feed reuse of barrels no use of caustics/acid/harsh chemical cleaners - enzyme cleaner instead re-use of heads as sanitizing spray
    1 point
  16. I found some very interesting technical resources that are relevant here. Pharmaceutical compounding syrups technology is very relevant. I found this great presentation that discusses how to preserve a syrup via water/alcohol vs sugar concentrations (starts on page 64) and general syrup technical goodness: https://www.philadelphia.edu.jo/academics/rmansour/uploads/Pharmaceutics/Solutions.pptx Great free Sugar Technology textbook: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781444314748 I found the exercises in Appendix B particularly helpful. Table starting on page 31: https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/TechnicalProceduresManual[1].pdf Cool calculator: https://www.vinolab.hr/calculator/gravity-density-sugar-conversions-en19
    1 point
  17. Hello there! We're creating a map to help connect womxn in the distilling industry. We also hope this can be an asset to the press, and consumers hoping to support minority-affiliated spirits companies. We're mapping Woman Owned, 50% Woman Owned, Women on Exec team, BIPOC, LGBTQ, Woman Distiller, and more. Womxn in Distilling via High-Proof Creative To add your company to the map, please follow this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScS2OEhTp1H6E_iiZAhD4TwzSdQ0G6iZ-gpruaROxxrqOu2hQ/viewform
    1 point
  18. You are on the right track when the distillery smells like someone vomited in a sweaty locker room.
    1 point
  19. I don't know if this is any help, but I run about 25 to 40 grams of botanicals per proof litter in my basket. 25g is for a mild gin with 9 botanicals and close to 40 grams for a full flavor gin with 23 botanicals
    1 point
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