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  1. There is no question that it is an international Communist conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids.
    4 points
  2. What size is your plate/frame? Full size 40x40, or one of the 1/4 size smaller jobs (20x20)? Could be simply a matter of having more filter area. I think that's the reason, because based on what you've said, I'd bet you are blinding with tiny bits of impermeable skin and pump (which if you've ever eaten an orange you'll realize they do a great job of keeping the juice in). We had similar challenges filtering powdered carbon from white rum. We just needed to step up to larger media to eliminate the mid-batch filter cleaning. Going from a 10" Code-7 cartridge to a 30" cartridge did the
    3 points
  3. Why? I'm old enough that they didn't teach the metric system when I went to school, however I taught myself. Since it's based on 10 it is simple to learn. All that you have to do is understand the Latin root words. I can tell you without a doubt that the metric system works really well when it comes to engineering, design drawing, science and research. Since the metric system is based on 10, it is so much easier to use and learn. Resisting a system that is in common use in the US is not very smart. You limit yourself in huge ways. If you don't understand the metric system and don'
    3 points
  4. Selling our Beaver Likker Moonshine™ in 50ml Beaver Shots™.
    3 points
  5. Good intel, thanks Paul. On another note, I cringe at worm condensers. More and more I don’t think they belong in modern commercial distilling. Their design is a hazard - long narrow vapor path, narrow diameter soft copper prone to kinking. It becomes very easy to overwhelm and easily achieve vapor speeds high enough to blow vapor through a cool tank. In a puke scenario, clogging is a very real possibility, and cleaning them afterwards is difficult. Shotgun style condensers offer redundancy and a far larger vapor path, easy to clean, incredibly difficult to clog when properly sized.
    2 points
  6. 1. Register as a "Primary Source." This registration must be renewed every year. Send copies of all permits by email. 2. Set up an account on Intax. (Not Intime.) 3. File a report every month on products shipped to Indiana on Intax. If there were no shipments during a given month, file a "zero report." Indiana is currently transitioning everything from their previous filing system, Intax, to a new one called Intime. There are all kinds of warnings on their site to hurry up and get on the new site. However, Alcohol PS filers have to keep using Intax for about one year more. This
    2 points
  7. I can build an all stainless still, by outward appearance, with my copper catalyzers inside that will result in spirits with no detectable sulfur taste. In fact my catalyzers in a stainless still, will have interaction with more vapor than an all copper pot still with no plates or copper packing, because my catalyzers insure that 100% of the ethanol vapor comes in contact with copper. In an all copper pot still with no copper plates, packing or catalyzers, you never get 100% copper vapor interaction. Years ago, I designed 2 types of copper catalyzers for my stills. I call the first t
    2 points
  8. If you reasonably expect to pay less than $50K in excise taxes - that's something like 9600 cases at the reduced rate and that is a lot for a small distillery - you do not need a bond. You are correct, the regulations are full of references to bonds and bonded premises. When a person is not required to have a bond, any time the regulations state that a bond is required, the person is treated as if the person holds the bond. So, there is no affect on the application apart from not being required to furnish a bond. TTB explained this in Industry Circular 2016-2, which stated, "Bond-relat
    2 points
  9. Best thing to do would be calling a company that either makes filters or filter pads and ask them. You can try TCW the complete winemaker as they have lot of good people there who can recommend the right product.
    2 points
  10. This is coming from the guy with a -17 community rating who thinks metric is unAmerican and covid is a hoax. you go girl. btw where were you on January 6? asking for a friend...
    2 points
  11. This whole thing is so asinine... My attorney contacted the FDA and this is the step-by-step email they sent: 1) The first thing you will want to do is delist the drug product. To do this: 1) Login to the CDER Direct Account (https://direct.fda.gov) 2) Click on “Product Listing and Reporting” 3) Click on “Submission Accepted” for the most recently, previously submitted Product Listing 4) Click on “Create New Version” (do not alter any of the information in the Header Details as it is correctly updated
    2 points
  12. 1. As part of your Daily Records, create a "destruction" form. 2. Record all details of the destroyed spirits on this form. It should include date, serial number, type of spirits, PG destroyed, perjury statement, etc. 3. Report it as destroyed on Line 19 of the Processing Report. Alternately, you could use Line 20 of the Storage Report, or perhaps report it as withdrawn for R&D on Line 12 of the Production Report. You would also want to have an additional R&D withdrawal form for this last option. 4. Keep all documentation on file.
    2 points
  13. Why are all the crazy people from Utah?
    2 points
  14. As much fores as a fores cutter cuts if a fores cutter could cut fores.
    2 points
  15. The VFD is apparently single phase and converts to 3 phase for the motor. Perfectly normal.
    2 points
  16. Since you've got them in the tote, give them lots of oxygen and slowly proof them down over the course of a couple months and you might be able to better integrate some of the wood. I would probably put them back into used fullsize bourbon barrels at a relatively low proof for a year or two and see what happens.
    2 points
  17. oh jesus christ here's this "idiot again". What an "unbelievable dipshit".
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. Don't waste your time. Go directly to Universal Packaging and let them do the heavy lifting.
    1 point
  20. Just an update - we have been making our rum for a few months now, we ended up buying an eccentric screw pump to pump the molasses. It takes around 45 mins to 60 mins to pump across when cold, which is fine for us, I assume this will speed up as we head into summer and things get warmer.
    1 point
  21. I will support Paul. The use of "catalysts" (special devices) inside the steel tank is the best price-quality option. From the point of view of Chemistry and Physics, in order for chemical reactions to occur with maximum efficiency, it is necessary to provide the largest possible contact surface of the substance-catalyst, and to provide a temperature higher than the "temperature of the beginning of catalytic reactions". That is why catalyst inserts must be in the path of alcohol-water vapor at temperatures above 70 Celsius. Copper does not work below 70 degrees Celsius. The s
    1 point
  22. The impact is not as significant as you might think, as pH is not linear. You also need to consider the buffering capability of the remaining water. If you were mixing 10-20% backset with RO water (which you wouldn’t do), you might have a problem, otherwise, nah. Grain adds buffering capacity as well, if you mashed into 100% backset, the pH would rise. 4.8-5.2 is a good starting pH range. Don’t be afraid to pitch low - this allows yeast to thrive as they will outcompete bacteria (which can crash the ph). This is totally counterintuitive, but one of the solutions to crashing pH is
    1 point
  23. Mors9 To gravity feed correctly you must have your condensate return connections in the column bases high enough above the liquid level in the pot to overcome the back pressure created by the level of liquid in the trays (its amazing how many still builders don't know this). If you have 23" of liquid total in all of the trays in your columns, then the lowest that the condensate can be at the bottom of the column is 24" above the top of the mash level in the pot. We go around 3" higher than that for good column condensate gravity feed back into the pot. If your column bases are too
    1 point
  24. I DM'ed you regarding the Lenticular filters. Let's talk. Thanks for the info.
    1 point
  25. Saw this on the Ohio Craft Brewers FB page It looks like CBMTRA is going to make it through in the most recent federal legislation. Senator Rob Portman has been instrumental in making this happen and would like to share the news directly with our breweries on a conference call tomorrow (Monday, December 21) at noon. If you'd like to be on that call please email me for the call-in details at mary@ohiocraftbeer.org
    1 point
  26. Typically used is powdered E120 (FD&C Carmine Lake Powder, sometimes, but not always called Natural Red #4), added to the final product per manufacturer direction and your local regulatory limits. This is a processed natural color that must meet certain requirements to be used. You would buy this from a flavoring/coloring house as a ready to use food dye. There are strict labeling requirements associated with E120. Purchase this from a reputable coloring house that can supply you with all the necessary documentation, data sheets, and not something like eBay or Alibaba.
    1 point
  27. Right! I barely use caustic at all anymore. I love the fact that I have almost completely eliminated its use here. The less gnarly chemicals, the better.
    1 point
  28. I've been getting a lot of these since early May. Usually they lose interest once I tell them they have to figure out their own freight (since they seem to be from companies I can't verify exist and they want me to use shipping companies that don't seem to exist). I've started ignoring them. It has to be some sort of scam, not sure how, but like you said, seems suspicious and not worth my time.
    1 point
  29. NOBODY!!! The huge Scottish Malt Whisky industry filters out the grain
    1 point
  30. We're pretty guarded about what our spirits actually cost to produce. This is because, they all wind up roughly costing the same - but, we sell them at a variety of prices. Including, some pretty high price points - those beverages are super profitable for us and yet some of them are very inexpensive to produce. So we like the mystique - and I think, so does the customer. It makes what we do seem out of reach and therefore, desirable.
    1 point
  31. I know virtually nothing about distribution of spirits. But I am a salesperson by trade and can say with conviction that you do not want your customer knowing your COGS under any circumstance. You lose a lot of leverage, ability to negotiate price, and gain little in return.
    1 point
  32. Anyone ever hear anything about arak? I want to start making it but can't find any info anywhere. I've searched the forum and can't find anything. Please, for the love of god, someone post something about arak.
    1 point
  33. The idea of any contaminants in the final product - whether it be cardboard/dust/bottle production stuff, after spending years carefully crafting a spirit, is enough reason for us to go with a professional rig. @MichaelAtTCW is always wicked helpful with questions/customer support. We'll be placing an order soon.
    1 point
  34. I just take my shirt off. Everyone's a winner
    1 point
  35. Ok... here is the basic design of the 6x manual tapered bottle labeling jig. Cut the diameter of the half circles to match your bottle size at the base where it will sit in the jig, and the neck. If you get a board twice as wide as you need, then cut with a hole saw and rip down the middle and you will have two of these so you can make two jigs. You don't want the bottle too snug, but you also don't want too much wiggle room. the spools for the labels are just plumbing parts. I used a couple of drawer pulls with a string across to line up where the bottom of the label goes. The only othe
    1 point
  36. On that same coin don't fuck retailers with bad product or preloading and shitty undercutting out of your tasting room for special releases
    1 point
  37. Do not agree to this you are being manipulated
    1 point
  38. whoa your going to tell the hell out of this!!!
    1 point
  39. Just to make sure this is clear distillers in the USA must follow TTB rules and labeling exactly as written and pay tax if the alcohol was not prepared to United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) grade or wasn't denatured. WHO and FDA set guidelines. TTB sets rules and waivers that DSP & AFP must follow for Covid-19 production of sanitizer. If in the USA start with the TTB guidance listed here and make sure you comply. https://www.ttb.gov/public-guidance/other-public-guidance-documents
    1 point
  40. Certainly not upset. Just think your conclusions might be overreaching, and could be wrong in specific cases. We have experimented with 5, 8, 10, 15, 23, 30 gallon barrels, all chars, all toasts, different modifications (traditional, honeycomb, sliced, etc.). We also use 53g traditional in all chars. Our experience is that it VERY much depends on the barrel type, not just the size, as well as the type of spirit being aged. Even confining to whiskies, we found quite a difference in optimal choice for use of smaller barrels with malt barley, malt rye, and bourbon. With bourbon, it matters what t
    1 point
  41. From the conclusion above: Don't forget about the small barrel maturation curve, it goes like this: 1. Young harsh distillate. 2. Tastes faintly like whiskey. 3. OH MY GOD ITS OVER-OAKED. 4. Wow, that's really good, I now realize that #2 tastes terrible. 5. Ah christ, now it's really over-oaked. 6. Garbage. Many pull at # 2, on the upswing of the extraction curve. I feel this is incorrect, misleading. You generally see these as products aged 6-8 months in 10 gallon. What you get it extraction products and color without maturat
    1 point
  42. Appeals to tradition usually make me laugh. While I certainly enjoy studying traditional methods and means and even own a few great traditional tools across the various trades I’ve studied, they are almost always made better with application of new technology and knowledge. Sure, I might like a Brown Bess musket and respect her place in history and her capabilities but even in that same form factor I can now have better barrel steel, stronger lock and trigger, better more efficient projectiles, cleaner faster powders, better sighting systems, and stronger more durable stocks.
    1 point
  43. Instead of slow distillation, for the last few years I've been advocating for something I call guided traditional practices. It is something I see in the fine wine industry and something that is part of many spirits category's history such as Bourbon. Bourbon went from practical distillers who weren't formally trained and knew little science but often produced excellent products to scientific concerns that relentlessly pursued efficiency to bland commodity ends and then back upwards to guided traditional practices with Maker's Mark and Wild Turkey when they got their own production (tequila is
    1 point
  44. Waaahhh Mom, it's really hard. Do I have to really do it if I can scam the customer instead? Please don't make me? I've got an idea, lets encourage Amazon to apply for their DSP and then the totes can be shipped right to their warehouse where they can add the drops of flavor and ship it direct. They can brand it "One Click Craft". Lets just eliminate the middle man all together : You !
    1 point
  45. While much of what Joseph says is, and always was, true (operating capital management, marketing 101), I don't buy the bubble argument for one second. People have been saying the same thing about craft brewing for 20 years. It's still growing in volume nearly 13% year on year. Spirits are just getting started. Millennials re-wrote the markets for craft beer and wine, and they're about to do the same for spirits. They don't have the age statement bias of their parents. They're not afraid of trying new things (would you or I have ever tried a cinnamon whiskey - bleah!) They also crave exper
    1 point
  46. Hey Spirited We are currently using both Poly and stainless tanks. They definately have a lifespan longer than three years, but I do see the wear on the poly tanks much more than the ss ones. Wit a clear spirit, I would suggest a 1 micron filter because you will see some cloudiness with anything much larger.
    1 point
  47. Hi Spirited, With regard to the question of polypropylene vs. stainless, what specifically are you referring to? The housing or the filter media? Brian 73 is right. We sell a lot of 5 and 10 micron nominal filter cartridges to distillers. Among our distillery customers I would say 10 micron edges out 5 micron in terms of popularity, but everyone's product is unique and will respond slightly differently to filtration. 1 to 5 microns constitutes the range of "sub-optical" particles, i.e. haze or cloudiness. You can't see the individual particles, but you can see their net effect.
    1 point
  48. So Im curious about the effectiveness/efficiency of the number of plates on a still. Now lets say I want to make vodka and I go with a larger still manufacturer, their set up will have 16+ plates. But if Im starting on a tighter budget and go with a component type set up, say the hillbilly flute or still dragon, I can apparently get by on making vodka with far fewer plates. Why is this? I get that more plates = a more pure distillate so it that it? The bigger systems simply produce a superior product in one run vs a smaller system requiring maybe two runs to get something comparable? Is it a s
    1 point


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