Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'spent grains'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Terms & Forum Business
    • Terms of Service for ADI Forum Users
    • Forum Business
  • Welcome, ADI News & General
    • Welcome & Introduce Yourself
    • ADI News & Events
    • Beginners
    • General Discussion
    • Business Opportunities
    • Speakeasy
  • Producing Product
    • Equipment
    • Hand Sanitizer Production
    • Packaging
    • Technique
    • Safety
    • Slow Distillation
  • Spirit Specific
    • Vodka
    • Whiskey
    • Gin
    • Rum
    • Absinthe (and other herbals)
    • Brandy
    • Distilled Spirit Specialty
  • Selling Your Product
    • Sales & Marketing
    • Distribution
    • Distillery Tasting Room
  • Government & Guilds
    • Federal Gov't
    • State
    • Local Issues
    • State Distillers Guilds
    • Canada
  • Marketplace
    • For Sale - Peer to Peer
    • For Sale by Vendors
    • Wanted To Buy
    • Marketplace Archive [Closed]
  • Career Archive
    • Help Wanted [Closed]
    • Job Wanted [Closed]

Categories

There are no results to display.

Blogs

  • Scott @ Twenty2Vodka's HighProofSpirit Infusing Blog
  • emutch's Blog
  • mitchabate's Blog
  • EZdrinking
  • Self Distribution
  • Luwest's Blog
  • Black Water Barrels

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 3 results

  1. KASON CORPORATION 67-71 East Willow Street Millburn, NJ 07041 Tel: 973-467-8140, ext 211 Fax: 973-258-9533 Website: http://www.Kason.com E-Mail: JLing@Kason.com Model MO-SS Centri-Sifter in 8 Feathers Distillery The best equipment to remove spent grains from their distillery’s discharge stream was found by 8 Feathers Distillery to be Kason Corporation’s Centri-Sifter. Substantially less expensive than alternatives from other manufacturers, the solution simplified equipment needs. Once grain is fermented or distilled, it requires disposal by a means acceptable to the local community. Craft distilleries, often located within a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) service area, require strict limits on solids discharged in the waste stream. Since many craft whiskey distilleries use hammer mills to grind grains, the resulting byproduct is too fine to allow lautering as the grain removal method, so an aggressive process like the Centri-Sifter must be used. When originally presented with 8 Feathers process challenge, Kason Corporation offered the MOS Centri-Sifter with a heavy duty screen as the best separation option – though possible to accomplish with a traditional Vibroscreen, the Centri-Sifter allows higher flow rates while also producing a discharge of spent grain with less remaining free water. After sending a sample of the material to be separated, Kason Corporation conducted a free process test and suggested a screen mesh and paddle design to separate material and minimize the risk of screen blinding. For a small distillery facing these restrictions, the challenge to economically remove spent grains becomes limited and daunting. Trucking of stillage discharge is cost prohibitive with high water content so producers seek solutions to separate grain from liquid for efficient disposal. Before choosing Kason Corporation’s Centri-Sifter, other separation methods identified included passive settling systems, chemical flocculation, or mechanical separation. Among mechanical separation options considered were filter presses, screw presses, and centrifugal separators. Initial studies indicated all these as viable choices where presses are the most expensive and centrifugal sifters are the most cost effective solutions. 8 Feathers Distillery studied these options and concluded that mechanical separation using Kason Corporation’s Centri-Sifter offered the best combination of cost, function and efficiency. Though settling tanks provide effective separation, the process requires multiple holding tanks with excessive time and space requirements. Use of chemical flocculation renders the spent grains unfit for use as animal feed – instead they become solid waste which must be disposed of in landfills. A filter press sized to meet distillery needs requires a large compressor to drive air diaphragm pumps. Without adding some form of solids coagulant to the process stream, the filter cloths require extensive cleaning after each use. The chemicals which enhance the solids collection render the collected grains unacceptable for use as animal feed. These additional equipment and chemical needs make filter presses, though effective, the most expensive option. Screw presses are appropriate for general industrial use but lack features to clean adequately for a distillery. No press fit within budget, flowrate and footprint constraints of 8 Feathers. While mechanical separation is the best solids removal method, Kason Corporation’s Centri Sifter minimizes cost, time, space, and environmental impacts best within the types considered. After purchase and prior to installation, Kason Corporation supplied mechanical drawings to allow 8 Feathers to construct the necessary platform to house the Centri-sifter. Once the unit arrived it was installed without issue and began initial testing immediately. The results were as good, or better, than expected. The unit processed a 1500 gallon, 40% solid test sample fed at 40gpm, without any screen blinding or degradation of performance. The separated grain was suitably dry for transport by truck. Now, the MOS Centri Sifter provided by Kason Corporation is in production at 8 Feathers Distillery and provides a key function in POTW compliance while still allowing captured solids to be used for animal feed in an efficient and cost effective grain separation solution. Links to Videos: Kason at 8 Feathers - Video 1 Kason at 8 Feathers - Video 2 Kason at 8 Feathers - Video 3 Kason at 8 Feathers - Video 4 Kason Centri-Sifter in 8 Feathers Distillery.pdf
  2. Distillery Turns Stillage Waste Into Revenue With Centrifugal Sifter LEWISVILLE, TEXAS Bendt Distilling Company, a maker of handcrafted whiskeys, uses a centrifugal sifter to turn spent grain byproduct into saleable livestock feed while recovering the liquid sour mash, a valuable component in the distilling process. Founded in 2012 by Natasha and Ryan DeHart, Bendt Distilling currently produces 1200 barrels per year of straight whiskeys and whiskey blends, employing traditional distillation methods. Dewatering stillage centrifugally Grains including wheat, rye, barley malt, oats, corn and triticale (a hybrid of wheat and rye), are ground to the consistency of coarse flour, then mixed with water, cooked, mashed and fermented. After fermentation, the strip run (first round of distillation) separates out the alcohol from the fermented mash. The remaining grain/ water mixture called “stillage” consists of water containing 5 to 10 percent grain solids. In its watery state, the stillage is a waste product to the distillery but contains enough grain and nutrients to be useful to farmers as livestock feed. Originally, Bendt pumped the stillage into a 20-cubic yard disposal container for pick-up by farmers at no charge. This saved the company disposal costs as long as the stillage was collected. If it wasn’t, the company had to pay to have it hauled away. In researching a solution, DeHart read about another distillery’s use of a centrifugal sifter to dewater stillage. He contacted the manufacturer, who evaluated Bendt’s application and recommended a Kason model MO-3BRG. The stillage now accumulates in a 10,000 gal (38,000 l) holding tank, and is pumped about once a week into the centrifugal sifter. The water/ grain mixture passes into the sifter’s horizontally-oriented cylindrical screening chamber where rotating helical paddles accelerate the mixture against the screen by centrifugal force. Liquid passes through the screen, exits through a flanged discharge chute at the base of the sifter and flows into discharge piping. Oversize grain solids are propelled along the cylindrical housing until they exit the downstream end of the cylinder and gravity feed into a 20 cubic yard (15.3 cu m) enclosed container. The centrifugal sifter operates at a rate of 30-40 gal/min (114 to 151 l/min), so emptying the tank takes four to five hours. The unit is 74 in. (1880 mm) long, including its motor, and 32 in. (813 mm) high. The stainless steel wedge wire screen is sized at 140 mesh (105 micron). After dewatering, the grain still contains about 80% water but has a texture “you can hold in your hand,” DeHart says. A full container holds about 15 tons (13.6 m.t.) of grain, which is the yield of 20,000 gal (75,708 l) of stillage. The liquid, called sour mash, is recovered and stored to add to subsequent fermentation batches. “Using sour mash saves water, provides flavor consistency, and naturally adjusts the pH,” Ryan DeHart says. Customizing the solution Working with Kason’s applications engineers, Bendt Distilling Company identified solutions for problem areas, such as dealing with the sludgy consistency of the stillage at the bottom of the holding tank, which could cause the sifter to stall, and dealing with stillage containing corn (a byproduct of bourbon production), that holds more water than the other grains and tends to become spongy. Kason’s solution was to run the unstable 208 3-phase supply more efficiently at a higher voltage by adding a transformer to step up the voltage. For the corn stillage, changing the screen mesh size and installing a higher-pitch paddle assembly pulls the stillage across the screen cylinder effectively while maintaining the same throughput and de-watering performance without any clogging or imbalance, allowing unattended operation. Ease of cleanout was a big factor in choosing the sifter, DeHart says. “We can clean it quickly, getting to all the pieces. With the three-bearing design, the front of the sifter opens for cleaning and changing parts. Internal components slide freely from the shaft.” The sifter’s compact design was also important for the distillery, as was its low power requirements “with just a 3 hp (2.2 kW) motor,” DeHart says. Heavy duty construction also suited the distillery as the sifter is installed outdoors. Finally, DeHart appreciates that the unit is relatively quiet. “We’re really happy with the setup,” DeHart says. “It’s a good low-cost solution compared to what else is on the market for separating the grain at a fast speed.” Turning an expense into revenue Partnering with a national feed company, the distillery worked out an agreement with a local cutting horse farm to take the spent grain. Under a profit-sharing agreement with the feed company, the distillery receives income in addition to having the spent grain hauled away at no cost The Kason centrifugal sifter has provided a “win-win” solution, DeHart says. “A waste byproduct for us is a useful product for somebody else.” Kason Corporation (973) 467-8140 | info@kason.com | www.kason.com Jim Ling North American Sales Manager Kason Corporation – Regional Sales Office Southgate, KY 41071 Tel. / Fax 270-60-KASON Review my background on LinkedIn Kason-Bendt Distillery.pdf
  3. From #ThrowBackThursday, let's talk beer! We are going to take you back to a time when our CENTRI-SIFTER™ Centrifugal Dewatering Screener saved the Alaskan Brewery Company a ton of capital. If you don’t already know this, beer making begins with cooking grains. Between batches, the brew vessels must be cleaned. At the time, the Alaskan Brewery Company had a problem with the bigger grain kernels settling down densely into the bottom of the tank, going down the drain into the wastewater system, bonding with the sludge, and jamming the pump. Here is what we put into our machine, and how we solved the problem: https://goo.gl/1uKwhV #TBT #AKBeerweek #ClientLove https://www.linkedin.com/company/kason-corporation/
×
×
  • Create New...