Jump to content

Proofing Whiskey


Recommended Posts

23 hours ago, Hudson bay distillers said:

We were just talking about this ....here were taxed on absolute alcohol ..so if u proof down in the barrel that wont change the aboslute alcohol in barrel . Or are we wrong 

Only taxed on what you move out of the bonded area and it needs to be bottled.  You can change the proof in the barrel with no tax consequences.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/24/2020 at 12:22 PM, SCLabGuy said:

 

- Wait: For the next 60-90 mins the product will still be integrating (ethanol and water molecules getting together in their final interlocked configuration, spitting off heat in the process)

 

Does it really need 60-90 minutes to get an accurate read for the next measurement?   I haven't been giving mine quite that long, and I want to be sure that I'm following best practices.  My batches are more in the 30 g range 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/2/2020 at 5:41 AM, JonDistiller said:

Does it really need 60-90 minutes to get an accurate read for the next measurement?   I haven't been giving mine quite that long, and I want to be sure that I'm following best practices.  My batches are more in the 30 g range 

Depending on what you are doing.  If you are proofing for bottling then I recommend a rest of a few weeks or even longer if you have the time.  It is really quite amazing how a long rest after proofing will improve the spirit as long as there is some head space in the container.  Creeping up on a bottle proof helps ensure proofing accuracy, IMO.   

There is a thermochemical reaction with H20 and ethanol combining.  It takes a while to settle down.  This increase in temp is the reason that brandy makers will take months to proof for barrel entry, and then months for post aging pre-bottling.  They don't what the chemical reaction to delete subtle qualities.  Too fast proofing can also result in saponification... a soapy quality to the spirit.   Sometimes a proofing rest will help mitigate that problem.  

We are in the business of waiting to get the best stuff in the bottle.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/16/2020 at 8:42 PM, captnKB said:

@adamOVDI prefer to reduce proof in the barrel as the change in proof in the barrel will extract flavors out of the barrel that will not come out at a higher proof. Overall reduction of proof slowly in the barrel yields a softer more rounded spirit. Brandy makers in europe have known this for many years but the approach has not really been given much atttention in america 

I'd never considered this. On this note, how much empty space (headspace?) do you leave in a barrel while aging your whiskey?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 8/16/2020 at 6:42 PM, captnKB said:

@adamOVDI prefer to reduce proof in the barrel as the change in proof in the barrel will extract flavors out of the barrel that will not come out at a higher proof. Overall reduction of proof slowly in the barrel yields a softer more rounded spirit. Brandy makers in europe have known this for many years but the approach has not really been given much atttention in america 

I've been experimenting with this too. Not sure why this isn't common practice. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2020 at 3:18 PM, CalwiseSpirits said:

I've been experimenting with this too. Not sure why this isn't common practice. 

How much empty volume do you leave in a barrel while aging?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/18/2020 at 10:55 AM, bconley said:

You know, the guy at Smoke Wagon made an interesting comment the other day regarding proofed whiskey...he tried a sample of something he said had just been proofed, so the "chemical reaction was still happening" and it needed to cool down. What exactly is that reaction? We have been bottling right after final proof and now I'm wondering if we are doing it all wrong....

In the world of wine and blending etc. When adding one liquid to another we always allow the 2 liquids to set or as we call( the marriage).  Any mixture or 2 liquids coming together have to arrange themselves as to come to a equilibrium.  The taking in of heat or giving off of heat can also be noticed.  All I have read shows bringing to the desired proof through mixing with quality water then waiting a few weeks and checking again the proof.  Be patient in all your experiments.  Many of these situations can be worked out in advance doing small experiments in your lab area using small mixes.  $50 of lab ware can take you along way with learning to mix proportions. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/26/2020 at 7:29 AM, adamOVD said:

I've been thinking of doing a low tech version of something similar by building a stand with a load cell and a vessel suspended top of it, so I could weigh out my proofing water into the vessel, and use gravity and a needle valve to slowly trickle water into a spirit vessel.

I've seen using a 500 ml water bottle with a small hole in the lid, and putting it in the bung. It drips slowly in over a couple of hours. The next day, repeat. 

  • Thumbs up 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...