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DIN or Tri-clover fittings


jocko

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Hello. In our brewery we use tri-clover fittings for almost everything. I see DIN connectors appear to be more common in the distilling industry (at least than the brewing industry).  

I'm more familiar with tri-clover and would be more comfortable using them for the distillery.  Any opinions on how or why of tri-clamp vs. DIN connectors. Some of the quotes I've gotten for stills had DIN connectors, and I was going to have them swapped out for tri-clover.  Any reason not to do this?

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Assuming you're in the US, Tri Clamp will be way cheaper, and way the heck more common. Hoses, valves, pumps, etc., will all be tri clamp by default, and you'll have to search or adapt to DIN, and pay more in the process. DIN is nice in that you can put it on one handed (till you have to tighten it down), but in all other senses doesn't make much sense. Again, assuming you are based in the US. If you're in Europe, perhaps it's more common.

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Din is nice for fixed assemblies, it doesn’t hold a candle to the flexibility of triclamp otherwise.

Camlock is an interesting option for hoses, but like Michael says, most everything is triclamp by default.

They do make spring clip triclamp clamps that does make tricky connections easier when you don’t have a third hand.

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1 hour ago, Silk City Distillers said:

Din is nice for fixed assemblies, it doesn’t hold a candle to the flexibility of triclamp otherwise.

Camlock is an interesting option for hoses, but like Michael says, most everything is triclamp by default.

They do make spring clip triclamp clamps that does make tricky connections easier when you don’t have a third hand.

Worked at a winery/distillery that used camlock; pain in the ass having sexed fittings.

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6 hours ago, starcat said:

If you are an American, you should resist ALL of the Metric System with every Fiber of your being......

Why?  I'm old enough that they didn't teach the metric system when I went to school, however I taught myself. Since it's based on 10 it is simple to learn.  All that you have to do is understand the Latin root words.

   I can tell you without a doubt that the metric system works really well when it comes to engineering, design drawing, science and research.  Since the metric system is based on 10, it is so much easier to use and learn.  Resisting a system that is in common use in the US is not very smart.  You limit yourself in huge ways. If you don't understand the metric system and don't want to use it you are making your own life difficult.  Basically you are partially illiterate when it comes to quantitative systems of measurement.   It's like not knowing how to read and not wanting to.  It makes no sense.

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On 11/27/2020 at 12:38 PM, jocko said:

Hello. In our brewery we use tri-clover fittings for almost everything. I see DIN connectors appear to be more common in the distilling industry (at least than the brewing industry).  

I'm more familiar with tri-clover and would be more comfortable using them for the distillery.  Any opinions on how or why of tri-clamp vs. DIN connectors. Some of the quotes I've gotten for stills had DIN connectors, and I was going to have them swapped out for tri-clover.  Any reason not to do this?

In my experience they aren't more or less common, it just depends where the equipment comes from. I used to be a brewer and every German brewhouse I worked with was set up with DIN (it's the German standard). I'm from the UK originally and everything there is set up with RJT, then I've also worked with SMS.

For what it's worth, even though DIN logically makes the most sense by far (in my opinion), I second the advice to either buy/make converters or ideally just hack off and re-weld any Euro fittings to Tri Clamp. I've found it next to impossible to find appropriate ID/OD matches for metric piping in my Italian packaging line here in Canada for one thing, and the fact I have to keep metric and imperial brewing hose around is a pita.

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