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What Yeast are You Using For Bourbon ?


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Just curious what yeast you might me using for your bourbon ?
Ive heard everything from DADY to bakers yeast, but just wondering what other options are being used out there without getting to technical?
Regards
Sim

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  • Pop Larkin changed the title to What Yeast are You Using For Bourbon ?
56 minutes ago, SlickFloss said:

For whiskey? Thats a low congener high proof isn't it

It's the yeast of choice for Wilderness Trail.

Also, works well for us working in 100°+ conditions in our distillery 6 months of the year. Some of our mashes get up to 110° and we get no off-flavors using FP-1.

We use it for both our whiskeys (rye, bourbon, rice) and honey spirit.

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2 hours ago, Golden Beaver Distillery said:

It's the yeast of choice for Wilderness Trail.

Also, works well for us working in 100°+ conditions in our distillery 6 months of the year. Some of our mashes get up to 110° and we get no off-flavors using FP-1.

We use it for both our whiskeys (rye, bourbon, rice) and honey spirit.

really cool, thanks for sharing! Definitely has a really nice body and mouthfeel coming off above 191 for sure.... Are you pitching low and just letting it finish without trying to control temp? Are you running cooling to it but because of location it is a losing battle? I bet it throws off some nice fruity esters up high. Are you able to run higher gravity mashes to completion using FP? 

We really like using some of the others I mentioned from Dr Pat and pitching low and kind of just letting them run. we will start to cool once we get to high eighties and nineties just so we don't stall out and leave Brix on the table. We see lots of fun complex acids being produced this way that give some more floral and fruit notes to our ryes.

 

Cheers

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I also use the FP1 from Ferm solutions.  I ferment at low temps, does well, now I learn it can handle high temps as well.  Will have try a few batches and see what other flavors we get.  

 

Adam

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21 hours ago, SlickFloss said:

really cool, thanks for sharing! Definitely has a really nice body and mouthfeel coming off above 191 for sure.... Are you pitching low and just letting it finish without trying to control temp? Are you running cooling to it but because of location it is a losing battle? I bet it throws off some nice fruity esters up high. Are you able to run higher gravity mashes to completion using FP? 

We really like using some of the others I mentioned from Dr Pat and pitching low and kind of just letting them run. we will start to cool once we get to high eighties and nineties just so we don't stall out and leave Brix on the table. We see lots of fun complex acids being produced this way that give some more floral and fruit notes to our ryes.

 

Cheers

Winter we pitch at 90°.  Summer 70-80°

Our honey wash starts at 18 Brix and finishes in 4 days. We use our jacket fermenters to keep the temps at 90°.

Our whiskeys are all fermented in open fermenters, no cooling,  and we just let them run.

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Thanks for this thread, everyone! This forum changes lives!

Quick newbie question:

I'm making vodka (potato and yams) and getting ready to scale up to commercial scale. I live on an island in the middle of the Pacific about 10 miles south of the equator. Our temperatures are pretty mild most of the year due to cold ocean currents from Antarctica (mid 80s in the daytime, 60-70 at night; think San Diego, CA), but there is a 3-4 month period where it can get up into the 90s for several days at a time. Do I have to invest in jacketed fermenters or is there a yeast that can reliably do the job with those temperature swings? I can have unjacketed fermenters fabricated locally. Jacketed would have to be imported and then shipped all the way out here, significantly adding to the cost. This zombie apocalypse really put a damper on my finances and I'm trying to find anywhere I can cut startup costs.

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2 hours ago, Galapadoc said:

Thanks for this thread, everyone! This forum changes lives!

Quick newbie question:

I'm making vodka (potato and yams) and getting ready to scale up to commercial scale. I live on an island in the middle of the Pacific about 10 miles south of the equator. Our temperatures are pretty mild most of the year due to cold ocean currents from Antarctica (mid 80s in the daytime, 60-70 at night; think San Diego, CA), but there is a 3-4 month period where it can get up into the 90s for several days at a time. Do I have to invest in jacketed fermenters or is there a yeast that can reliably do the job with those temperature swings? I can have unjacketed fermenters fabricated locally. Jacketed would have to be imported and then shipped all the way out here, significantly adding to the cost. This zombie apocalypse really put a damper on my finances and I'm trying to find anywhere I can cut startup costs.

Get a mash pump and a tube-in-tube heat exchanger. You can cool your mashes on the cheap. @Southernhighlandercan help you out sourcing one. 

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7 hours ago, Golden Beaver Distillery said:

Get a mash pump and a tube-in-tube heat exchanger. You can cool your mashes on the cheap. @Southernhighlandercan help you out sourcing one. 

Thanks. I'll be getting most of my gear from Paul. I'll ask him about this.

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Completely forgot to rely to your actual question: yes there are super high temp tolerant yeasts available. Specifically ones for rummproduction. Hit up ferm solutions they will help you out. 

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46 minutes ago, SlickFloss said:

Completely forgot to rely to your actual question: yes there are super high temp tolerant yeasts available. Specifically ones for rummproduction. Hit up ferm solutions they will help you out. 

Thanks. I sent them a request for info yesterday.

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