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Mash cooling without jacketed tanks


Pour Decisions

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Looking for input on mash cooling. What recommended process would work to cool to pitch temp without the use of a jacketed chilled tank? Don't need to crash cool but looking to speed up the process. I assume a counter flow heat exchanger of sorts would suffice? I'm talking small volumes around 100 gallon. I do have ice cold 49° spring water and would like to ferment on grain.

 

What methods have been working?

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do a double thick mash and add the rest of the water ,cold, at the end. if you are using enzymes this shouldnt be an issue, just pitch a little alpha as you are heating up, to keep things from getting too thick.

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I actually like immersion coils better than tube in tube, so our mash tuns come with internal cooling coils also our pro series mash tuns have really strong agitators so you can leave some of the water out of the recipe and then add it to the mash as cold water so that the crash cool is done in 2 or 3 minutes.  We do have tube in tube heat exchangers at a great price that will crash cool your mash in 10 to 15 minutes.   Of you would like a qoute email paul@distillery-equipment.com or if you would like to discuss call 417-778-6908 and ask for Paul. 

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Yep you're on the right track with a counter flow heat exchanger. That's a small volume and if you can count on 49 degree spring water year round that's a great cooling temp. Hit up Jesse at Trident Stills in Maine, he can fab you something that's sized appropriately (I think you'll find other suppliers will only have units that are wayyy oversized for your operation) and you can't beat his prices. He made us a couple that were priced much better than other quotes we got, not to mention he is full of great mashing/distilling advice if you ever need any. Also what @ViolentBlue suggested about keeping the volume low and topping off with cold water is great advice. After doing that, an immersion cooler like @Southernhighlander suggested will probably cut it too, though I have never used one personally.

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1 hour ago, Southernhighlander said:

I actually like immersion coils better than tube in tube, so our mash tuns come with internal cooling coils also our pro series mash tuns have really strong agitators so you can leave some of the water out of the recipe and then add it to the mash as cold water so that the crash cool is done in 2 or 3 minutes.  We do have tube in tube heat exchangers at a great price that will crash cool your mash in 10 to 15 minutes.   Of you would like a qoute email paul@distillery-equipment.com or if you would like to discuss call 417-778-6908 and ask for Paul. 

I was also researching immersion coils but was thinking more on the lines of using one in the ferment tank. What's your thoughts on using one in the mash kettle vs in the ferment tank? I have three 110 gallon conical poly tanks that I could potentially pump one batch into and let an immersion cooler go to work while I'm mashing in a new batch. Opening on the ferment tanks is only around 12" diameter so somewhat limited as to what I could fit in there. 

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Check out: http://www.bubbasbarrels.com/cooling-coil

These are made for ~100 gallon fermenters. If you don't have the right tri-clamp fitting for your fermenter, you can buy the coils alone and make adapt them to fit your tank lid/manway. That's what I did with our 275 gallon IBC totes that we use as fermenters.

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1 hour ago, glisade said:

Check out: http://www.bubbasbarrels.com/cooling-coil

These are made for ~100 gallon fermenters. If you don't have the right tri-clamp fitting for your fermenter, you can buy the coils alone and make adapt them to fit your tank lid/manway. That's what I did with our 275 gallon IBC totes that we use as fermenters.

Nice idea, I'm surprised I missed them. Do you agitate by some means to increase the contact with the coil?

 

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These coils are undersized for our fermenters but we don't need tight temperature control. We don't agitate, the fermentation is doing that for us in a way. I've also built some coils for cooling mash from coiled copper pipe you can buy at Lowe's. They sell it in a flat coil and you can just slowly unwind it and coil it yourself but the diameter of the coil would be better for a 55 gallon drum. We used something like this: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Mueller-Streamline-3-4-in-x-60-ft-Copper-K-Coil/4742152 made a cooling coil with it and put it in a drum filled with cold water and pumped the mash through the coil into the fermenter.  

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Pour Decisions .

A coil will cool either way but it will cool a little faster if you move the mash around. A pump to  circulate the mash in your fermenter would give you the circulation that you need.   If your mash is grain out, you can use a centrifugal pump to circulate with.  If it's grain in just let me know and I will give you some recommendations.

We have coils for 100 gallon fermenters as well.  Ours are larger, have more surface area and cost less that Carl's (Bubba's).  Carl is a great guy and a friend of mine.  His products are good quality and well priced, but I have him beat on this one. 

 Just email Susan@distillery-equipment.com and let her know that you would like pricing and pics of our cooling coil for 100 gallon barrel fermenters. 

We do not have these on any of our web sites.

Thanks

Paul Hall 

email: paul@distillery-equipment.com

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Some of our mashes are about 125 gallons, we do the whole thing with cold water / backset additions without additional cooling. In the summer we have to pre-chill the water as our municipal water rises to about 70F but its a small enough volume that 3 or 4 - 5 gallon buckets in a chest freezer is sufficient. We have a chilling coil but have only used it a few times in the last several years during extreme hot weather events. 

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