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Sugar beet spirits


bluestar

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Anyone else tried distilling from sugar beet syrup? Not molasses, that is vile. Not final refined sugar, there is almost no difference from cane sugar. But from either the raw beet syrup or the processed "thick" syrup just before final crystallization? If so, I am interested in comparing experiences. Of course, it could be used for a base for vodka, but I am more interested in a rum-like product, like Tuzemak. Anyone have specific knowledge on how Tuzemak is made (not the general web info)?

By the way, this post is also done as a test of the new spirit forums.

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You should talk to Nate at Old Sugar Distillery: http://madisondistillery.com/Homepage.html I don't think he's on the forum.

He makes a sugar beet-based Honey Liqueur that is aged in oak then lightly sweetened with honey before bottling. It's quite nice. I believe he uses brown sugar made from beets as a base, though I could be remembering that incorrectly.

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I think he is specifically talking about beet molasses.

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Anyone else tried distilling from sugar beet syrup? Not molasses, that is vile. Not final refined sugar, there is almost no difference from cane sugar. But from either the raw beet syrup or the processed "thick" syrup just before final crystallization? If so, I am interested in comparing experiences. Of course, it could be used for a base for vodka, but I am more interested in a rum-like product, like Tuzemak. Anyone have specific knowledge on how Tuzemak is made (not the general web info)?

By the way, this post is also done as a test of the new spirit forums.

The beet syrup you speak of is called 'mother syrup'. Due to its viscosity its not often available, they will tend to sell you syrup taken part way through the evaporation boil. You can make very good vodkas from darker sugar syrups/light molasses, if you have the right column set-up. But agreed its harder to rectify.

Personally, there is a distinct difference between beet rums and can rums. My experience is beet sugars washes tend to carry a higher residual (unfermented) sugar level than cane washes, and beet sugar, tends to caramelise at a lower temperature than cane sugar, so more burnt/caramel components pass over to the distillate. Could be a benefit, depending on your desired flavour profile. My advise, try both. experiment. No two refined (especially 'brown') sugars are the same. Its also worth mentioning that brown beet sugar is made quiet differently to brown cane sugar.

Rich..

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Yes, I was refering to beet molasses as vile. At least for humans, indigestible. Cows like it.

Beet and cane WHITE sugar are chemically identical (well, there is about 0.5% residuals non-sugar that could vary, but not much), so the results should be the same from WHITE sugar. BROWN sugar, as noted above, is actually WHITE sugar with molasses added, so the character of the BROWN sugar would reflect the character of the added molasses. I believe most BROWN sugar from beets is actually made with added cane molasses.

I think "mother syrup" is the source material early in the process. I have not worked with that yet. "Thick syrup" is the processed product just before crystallization and the removal of the beet molasses. I have found the major difficult from distilling its ferment is not the flavor profile, since the molasses component is less than 8% and thus not overly harsh (I actually find it interesting). The problem is that the beet processing adds sulphur before getting to this stage, and that sulfur obviously must be removed. The problem is akin to use of lightly sulfured cane molasses or excess sulfuring in a wine.

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You should talk to Nate at Old Sugar Distillery: http://madisondistillery.com/Homepage.html I don't think he's on the forum.

He makes a sugar beet-based Honey Liqueur that is aged in oak then lightly sweetened with honey before bottling. It's quite nice. I believe he uses brown sugar made from beets as a base, though I could be remembering that incorrectly.

Yes, I spoke with Nate, and he is using brown sugar, but the brown beet sugar I have access to is actually flavored with cane molasses. I don't know any detail about his source of brown sugar. But the thick syrup I use would be the equivalent of a brown sugar from all beet, since it is the white beet sugar before the removal of the molasses, in syrup form.

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