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TTB monthly Processing report--Questions


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Any help understanding how to fill out the ttb monthly processing report is greatly appreciated. I have been calling and emailing the ttb all week trying to get help and NO ONE has responded!! But I better not be late with my report.... <_<

Specific question on processing report:

line 28 BOTTLED OR PACKAGED wants "proof gallons"-- is that proof gallons at 190 or at bottled proof which is 55 proof for some and 80 proof for some (and do I add those totals together? That doesn't make sense to me).

same goes for lines 27, 33, 44, 46

help?

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I thought it was # of wine gallons x proof / 100 = proof gallons

ex: 17 gallons x 190/100 = 32.3 proof gallons

proof gallons are one gallon at 100 proof at 60 degrees f. everything must be converted to that.

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Hello Denise

I got all this information from the TTB website (by googling it)

1.

What is a proof gallon and how do I convert regular gallons to proof gallons?

A proof gallon is one liquid gallon of spirits that is 50% alcohol at 60 degrees F. Distilled Spirits* bottled at 80 proof (40% alcohol) would be 0.8 proof gallons per gallon of liquid. At 125 proof, a gallon of liquid would be 1.25 proof gallons. In the industrial and fuel industries, most alcohol is at 190 or 200 degrees of proof. One gallon of alcohol that is 200 proof is equal to 2.0 proof gallons. Refer to 27 CFR Part 19 and 27 CFR Part 30 concerning procedures for determining proof, gauging spirits to determine quantity by weight or volume, or other procedures and regulations concerning measurement of alcohol.

*(also known in beverage and industrial or fuel industries as alcohol or ethanol)

2.

Do I fill out my reports in proof gallons or regular gallons?

Three of the required monthly operational reports submitted by a Distilled Spirits Plant (Forms 5110.40 – Production; 5110.11 – Storage; F 5110.28 – Processing) are completed using proof gallons. The fourth report – Form 5110.43 – Processing (Denaturing) – is completed in wine gallons (regular US liquid gallons).

All denatured alcohol and articles manufactured from denatured alcohol are shown in records and reports in wine gallons. Line 11 of Form 5110.28, Used for Denaturation, is expressed in proof gallons. The corresponding line 2 of the Form 5110.43, Produced (denatured spirits) is expressed in wine gallons – it reflects the net quantity of wine gallons of spirits, plus added denaturing materials reflected in the finished denatured alcohol product.

What is proof?

Proof is a method of measuring the alcohol content of spirits. You calculate the proof of a spirits product by multiplying the percent of alcohol by volume by two (2). For example, a spirits product that has a 40% alcohol content by volume is 80 proof [40 multiplied by 2 = 80].

Converting U.S. gallons into proof gallons for tax purposes:

1. Multiply U.S. gallons by the percent of alcohol by volume.

2. Multiply by 2.

3. Divide by 100.

Sample calculation:

1. 100 U.S. gallons x 40% alcohol by volume=4000

2. 4000 x 2=8000

3. 8000/100= 80 proof gallons

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I have read all the terms on the website. But when it comes to filling out the monthly precessing report, its not clear cut as to report the numbers, except that it wants it in proof gallons on the first page, and then on the 2nd page it asked for wine gallons.

PART I wants bulk material counts, PART II want finished product counts. so I am dealing with 190 proof, 80 proof and 55 proof, and not sure how or where to put what and if I add together.... confused

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Denise you have a basic misunderstanding of proof gallons. The forms are quite clear about proof or wine gallon reporting, and there are tutorials. How you got this far I don't know. But the TTB link explaining how to calculate proof gallons is here http://www.ttb.gov/spirits/convtbl.shtml . Add up all your products.

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I don't think the tutorials are helpful at all, they simply restate the wording on the report. But I do believe I am over analyzing what they want, and confusing myself, out of fear of reporting wrong. I have everything else done and reported, this one report is confusing because of bulk and finished products and asking for both proof and wine gallons.

Thanks

Denise you have a basic misunderstanding of proof gallons. The forms are quite clear about proof or wine gallon reporting, and there are tutorials. How you got this far I don't know. But the TTB link explaining how to calculate proof gallons is here http://www.ttb.gov/s...s/convtbl.shtml . Add up all your products.

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What is proof?

Proof is a method of measuring the alcohol content of spirits. You calculate the proof of a spirits product by multiplying the percent of alcohol by volume by two (2). For example, a spirits product that has a 40% alcohol content by volume is 80 proof [40 multiplied by 2 = 80].

Converting U.S. gallons into proof gallons for tax purposes:

1. Multiply U.S. gallons by the percent of alcohol by volume.

2. Multiply by 2.

3. Divide by 100.

Sample calculation:

1. 100 U.S. gallons x 40% alcohol by volume=4000

2. 4000 x 2=8000

3. 8000/100= 80 proof gallons

I agree that the TTB is not very clear until you can get your head around the difference between "Proof gallons", "wine gallons" and "U.S. gallons"

To start with you may not realise "wine gallons" and "U.S. gallons" are the same thing.

In the example above, if you already have your measurements in "proof" there is no point in dividing by 2 to get ABV then in line 2 multiply by 2

So in your example

17 gallons of 190 proof, 17 X 190/100 = 32.3 proof gallons

That can be reported as 17 wine gallons (=US gallons) and/or 32.3 proof gallons depending on which part of the form you are filling in

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If you have one US Gallon (the same as one Wine Gallon, WG) at 190 proof, you have 1.9 PG (proof gallon)

If you have one WG at 55 proof, you have .55 PG.

If you have one WG at 80 proof, you have .80 PG.

Multiply WG by proof to get PG (.55, .80, 1.90 are the ones you listed). Divide PG by proof to get WG.

A liter is .264172 WG, so a 750 ml bottle is .198129 WG (.264172 x .75)

If that bottle is 80 proof, it's .1585 PG (.198129 x .8) or .109 PG at 55 proof (.198129 x .55).

One of your cases, if it's a 6 pack case and 80 proof, is .951 PG. The wine gallons aren't changing; they are 1.189 WG per 6 pack case.

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