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Passing mash through heat exchanger?


Lenny

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For those that pump their mash though a tube-in-tube/shell heat exchanger...

how large of a diameter inner tube would you think adequate to avoid clogging? We've had a hx with approximately 50 square feet of cooling capacity speced out for a bourbon project that we're getting going -- I've got 3 options I'm looking at with different tube diameters for the mash to to travel though: A is .75", B is 1", and C is 1.5". I'm leaning towards option B because of the units minimal footprint, but I sure don't want to bring something in here that can't pass the mash.

I should mention, the mash that we're looking to cool will be grain-in with a fairly standard water to grist ratio, ground close to flour though a 3 roller mill, and with potential to be on the stickier side.

Thoughts?

Edited by Lenny
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I would reccomend something other than tube in shell. A friend ruined a 1" tube in shell when he attempted to pump a high rye bourbon through it and the mash turned to a dense sticky mess. It clogged so badly that we had to cut open the tube in shell to clear out the clog and weld it back together.

We use an immersion chiller here at our place. It works great and takes the temp on a 500 gallon mash from 150 degrees to 85 in about 90 minutes

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Normally, distillers use their mash transfer pump (diaph. type) to push the mash through.

Centrifugals are not usually a good match.

I would get my pump recommendation from where I purchase the exchanger, simple as that.

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20151014 182333

Old school and cheap...if you have the containers to put them in. We run our 300 gallon mash through three of these 3/4" 60 foot coils. They sit in stainless drums with cold city water and takes about 1.5 hours to cool from 140F to 80F. Each coil costs about $250 to make with all fittings. We run it with an air diaphragm pump. Grain-in with roughly 2:1 corn to water ratio.

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  • 1 month later...

I use a 250k BTU heat exchanger connected to a boiler and have no problems. My mash isn't completely clean but I do strain it before running it thru. I use a pump that I purchased that I use to pump mash from one tank to another. I can adjust the speed of the mash with the pump and I think that's important. The heat exchanger that I purchased calls for 25 GPM but can do it quicker if I want to reduce the heat in the still. I have 1.5 inch hoses and connections that I use. I did have problems before I strained it so be sure you do that first. Otherwise, you shouldn't have any problems. I am sure to clean out the heat exchanger each time I use it using hot water and the typical cleaners used for dairy operations.

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Thanks for all the feedback. We ended up scoring this beast (9' tall x 2' wide with 60 sq/ft of cooling area) from Dairy engineering in Denver: https://www.instagram.com/p/_5RElzOfXY/

Pretty sure they have a few more priced at $3,500 if anyone is in need of one.

We are currently finishing up the chilling of our first successful bourbon mash! We milled to a fairly course flour and it's being recirculated very effectively though our 1.5hp centrifugal pump with a 3/4" out port, on though the heat exchanger with a 1" inner tube that the mash travels though.

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