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IanMcCarthy

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IanMcCarthy last won the day on August 7 2019

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About IanMcCarthy

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  1. Andy, I do not. I was under the impression a winery that sent wine or pomace out to a distillery, and received brandy or grappa in return, could sell those bottles without anything other than an 02-winegrowers license in California. Would the addition of botanicals change that to the best of your knowledge?
  2. Oh excellent - that is the best possible answer. Did the list have to be entirely comprehensive, or just the greatest hits?
  3. Working on a distilled grape brandy with many added herbs - sort of a bitters/amaro vibe. The catch is I have a winemakers license, and this would be a "grape brandy with other stuff". Best I can find is where there is a single or dominant botanical, the wording is "brandy flavored with X". What if i have a whole gaggle of botanicals in there? Thanks much ya'll.
  4. Geoman, 1) It is going to take much more than 30 pounds of fruit to make brandy. Of course, smaller scale makes distillation more difficult, because the space between heads and tails is so compact. Even the smallest test batches of fruit I do start with 500# - regardless of your still size. 2) Sugar. Good fruit brandy is just fruit, no added sugar. You need to concentrate the flavor of a huge amount of fruit to get something aromatic. in the case of your 30# peach v 7# white sugar, you are getting much more fermentable sugar from the sugar than the peach. That is going to dilute you
  5. Nat - on that subject of Calvados producers using old oak for distillates - they also do the same thing for their ciders, for up to a full year. As I understand it, it is a question of necessity: Fill your tank with cider, and let it sit (ferment) until you have more cider to put in next season. Otherwise, they cask dries out and you get problems with leaking. The effect of leaving low-alcohol, un-sulphured cider around for a full year is a big increase in volatile acidity. Whenever I hear folks comparing American and French apple brandy, they are always quick to talk about terroir and va
  6. Here is the plan: Farm distillery. Grow fruit, and distill it there. It would happen to be the farm that I live on. Does anyone have advice on the specific legal hurtles involved with this? Is it even in the realm of possibility? Thanks for your help Californios.
  7. Hello all, Last year I started chasing my dream of distilling eau de vie on a commercial scale - currently I am operating out of a friends distillery - he makes vodka from grain and whiskey, primarily. The whole fruit distillate thing is new to him, (he gets a chuckle out of my "efficiency", and the fermentation times for spontaneous yeasts... you might get the picture). Every bit of knowledge I glean from eau de vie distillers I admire includes something along the lines of "the mash but be heated as slowly and evenly as possible". All the whiskey distillers I have rubbed shoulders with hav
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